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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, I've refinished a lot of furniture. Cut VERY little wood. I'm trying to make the leap here to actually make things....

Anyway I have my dad's old Craftsmen Table Saw. The blade on it was shot, and I bought 25 bf of some really nice Bubinga, that I now need to cut.

After entirely too much research and deliberation I FINALLY ordered a replacement blade. The Oshlun Ultimate General Purpose Blade Thin Kerf.. it was a combination of research, affordability , and the fact that I hope to soon replace my table saw that lead me to the Oshlun.

My question is this. Once I get the new blade mounted, and lined up correctly is there anything I should do before I use it in my Bubinga? I really have no idea, but I KNOW I have no idea, so I think that means I'm doing ok..lol

Do I run some scrap through to break it in first? If that's stupid, please remember I have no idea and that's why I'm asking..lol Do I put anything on the blade? The shaft? I'm just spitballjng here but I'm trying to do things right the first time and learn the right way the first time so I don't ruin any material or pull a J.T. Cash....

Thank you

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How old is the Craftsman saw, and has it been taken care of? If it's a 113 model or earlier, and in good shape you might want to just keep it. Those things were great in the day. The newer ones are junk.

When was the last ime the saw was used and how was it stored. That's step one.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It's been used by my dad, maybe a dozen times a year. Runs great. Here is a picture.

It's dirty, it's been sitting a couple months since I brought it over after he passed away. I'll keep it no matter what, but I'd be interested to know what it was. I need to get some rest of the top..it's not super rough, and doesn't chip off or anything, just discolored. I know it's not in great shape, but it's all I got and it was his so it's what I have to use right now. I've cut pine and some oak with it and it works fine. Doesn't seem to slow down or even know the woods there...but I can safely say I Never use it for anything thicker than 13/16". I've only chopped up a 2x4 and it breeawd through that, but I don't see myself getting any really thicker material to build with at this point.

I was bummed because I don't think I can use my Dado bladesnkike I wanted because I don't think the stud is long enough..I'm not really sure.
I would appreciate EVERY SINGLE insight or suggestion you have. If it's a junk table, you can say it. Pop wasn't a rich guy. Thank you for helping.


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Discussion Starter #4
I think it might be a model 113...I googled that and it looks like it. Then I found the model number on my saw. 113.298750 so is it worth having around?

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It has a cast iron top and wings. Most new ones are cast aluminum or some kind of pot metal so definitely a plus. It is belt driven which means you might have the option to install a larger motor by maybe 1/2 hp which can make a big difference. You can also upgrade the fence to something like the Mule/Accusquare that I've been using using for about 20 years. I also have a Unisaw with Unifence and the Mule is just as good and a lot cheaper. The issue then is if it is worth upgrading or just getting a better saw. 220 volt is better and at around 2 hp plus you have to go that way. I have 3hp with the Unisaw and with a sharp thin kerf blade I can bury it in a 3" cut on hardwood and not slow down.

The saw you have should do pretty well everything you need it to as you have stated that you don't plan on going more than 13/16" thick so that is well withing the limits of that saw. Make sure the fence is lined up with the blade. Rip some test pieces and see if the rear of the blade is making contact with the sides of the cut. If the back of the blade is contacting the wood on the side towards the fence then the end of the fence needs to move away from the blade and vice versa. Check to make sure that the blade is actually 90* to the table. Don't trust the blade stops for this because sawdust can get built up against the stops and prevent the mechanism from going as far as it should.

Ideally the blade should line up with the miter slots before you start that but as far as ripping goes it only matters that the blade and fence be lined up properly. As you ask questions you'll learn more and know more questions to ask and eventually you'll know how to properly tune that saw so that it will do what you want it to. Unless there is something substantially wrong with it then in time it will do what you want it to.
 

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I had that saw some years ago and the problem I had was the fence. It was really hard to use and cut straight. To fix this problem I bought a Vega table saw fence and it turned my table saw into a really nice saw. For around $300 you could have a nice saw. That is pretty cheap these days.

Table Saw Fence Systems | Rockler Woodworking and Hardware
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If I replaced the motor , can I replace the arbir so I can use my 6" dado? Also could I use a 2 hp motor, or would 1.5 be the limit?

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I have a similar 113. I upgraded the fence to a Delta T2. Replaced the pulleys, added PALS for alignment, and a link belt . I am able to use a Dado blade with no problem. It works very well. If it has sentimental value then spruce it up. I recently replaced the bearings after years of use.
 

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Those Craftsman 113's were great old saws. Iron and solid. Not fancy, but did the job. I got a 1.5 horse Leeson motor from Northern Tool (#152811) when I thought mine was going bad - it wasn't. Can wire it for 110 or 220 - bracket holes lines right up. It makes it hum, and belts are available at the local auto parts store. If the original 1 hp still works good - leave it and just get a good blade, a good fence, clean her up, wax the table, and use it. Parts are readily available on Ebay and some from Sears yet. Also check the arbor pulley. That may need replacing or tightening. I got a cheap contractor saw from Lowes ($300) as a back up when I was having problems with my 113, but after seeing how much plastic and aluminum was used, and how bad the quality was, I'll rebuild the old 113 and fix it as long as I can. They don't break down very often - even less with good care. Plus, Dad would be proud to see you using it.
 

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@KhalTom

I found the manual for your saw online and attached to this post in case you don't have it - manual says you can use a dado blade up to 13/16".
I've got my dad's old Beaver contractor saw - it's not worth much these days so I'm keeping it for the memories and may pass it on to my grandson eventually (when he gets older) even though I've got another table saw.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
@KhalTom

I found the manual for your saw online and attached to this post in case you don't have it - manual says you can use a dado blade up to 13/16".
I've got my dad's old Beaver contractor saw - it's not worth much these days so I'm keeping it for the memories and may pass it on to my grandson eventually (when he gets older) even though I've got another table saw.
Do you know what year it's from? Just curious how old it is...

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No sorry, can't help you with that but you'll see at the bottom of the last page, the manual was printed in February, 1990 - that might help you narrow down the year.
 

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Actually, I downloaded the wrong manual, but it was close. Here's the manual for the 113.298760 which looks more like your saw. This manual was printed July, 1990.
 

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Thank you bro

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You're welcome - can I make a suggestion - it would be nice (since you've now got 16 posts although that doesn't really matter) - would you mind updating your profile, when you get a chance, with at least your first name. That way we'll know what to call you - is it Tom, or is it Khal or is it something else???? And it will certainly be more personal.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #19
OK..I did that. Took me a minute but it's done.

I'm a Huge Game of Thrones fan, that's where my name came from
Khal is Dothraki Chief
Tom is my name

I'm a little bit if a sci fy geek, I make no apologies. Lol

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I sugest you keep the saw and check YouTube for how to tune up a table saw. There are numberous strings on the site about how to remove rust. Do a quick search and you'll find them.

I would even be reluctant to replace the motor unless it wasn't able to work without stalling.

The essence of the table saw is precision, and that comes from the alignment of the blade with, first, the miter slots, then with the fence. The fence would be the thing I'd spend my money on. Several suggested above are quite good. You might consider getting one small item, a Wixey angle guage, about $31 on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Wixey-WR300-...=1494106300&sr=8-1&keywords=wixey+angle+gauge This will allow you to set your blade to exact angles fairly easily. Half a degree off will make it impossible to get a good glue up. This needs to be done frequently, impacted sawdust can mess up the angle over time, so can vibration.

There are no safety devices on older saws, so you should get at least one Grripper, a special push block designed to keep you hands and the blade safely far apart. This also allows you to push down, forward and against the fence all at once. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001I9UNW...=grr-ipper&pd_rd_r=WJ2X48SF9AZH8FAAMQF0&psc=1

Develop some habits, such as standing to the right of the line of the blade so if you get a kickback (fence alignment in, instead of slightly out, or trying to cut warped wood). This is when the back of the blade catches the wood and shoves it back at you at speeds of around 100 mph. Big ouch, big bruise, long time sore spot, possibly a bruised or even cracked rib.

I NEVER push anything toward the blade with a hand or digit in line with the blade. I have a habit of keeping my thumbs IN when using any saw and simply cannot place my hand withing 5-6 inches of a spinning blade without a push block. Use a push block or stick or the Grripper at all times, Of course, no drinking before or during tool time.

Align the fence so that it is maybe 3 or 4 thousanths out from the blade path at the far end. This is trivial for alignment, but pretty much ends kickback. You do this by aligning the fence to the miter slot, which is why you want to make sure the blade is aligned with the miter slot. I count this triple alignment as so important I have a Woodpecker gadget for the purpose (probably overkill).

As you go along, you'll most likely want to build a table saw sled so your crosscuts are dead on 90 degrees. I also have a Rockler sled that allows cutting angles with ease. Worth it to me.

When ripping a thin piece off a wide piece, keep the wide piece against the fence and the cutoff will simply fall off. Putting the thin piece against the fence is called trapping, and it is the recipe for kickbacks.

The miter gauge is another thing. You probably still have your dad's, and it is probably still good. But all of these need to be aligned. Nothing does that better than a good draftman's triangle with precise 90 and 45 degree angles. Rockler makes a good near quarter inch thick one that's big enough so you can position it on the blade (not touching the tips), then push the gauge up to it and adjust until the gauge is dead flat against the triangle. You can't trust the markings on most gauges, and all gauges can be wrong it the blade/miter slot alignment is off.

Sawdust will ruin your lungs! You have to wear a good quality mask. 3M makes some disposables with a small valve that lets air out, but not in. I have a battery operated vented mask that has a small fan drawing air in through a filter. This gives a positive pressure in the mask so sawdust is always being blown away. It doesn't interfere with my safety glasses, in fact on mine the air leaks out just under my glasses so the don't fog up. In some climates, this is a real bonus. Rockler has this on sale now for $60. Get a couple of sets of AA rechargables for it. Power Air Respirator | Rockler Woodworking and Hardware

You've gotten many helpful suggestions about renewing your saw, but I wanted to make sure you got some safety info. as well. Lots of people get careless or cavalier and lose digits every year. Have fun with your fine saw, but be careful.

And I'd like to know your first name as well.
 
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