Router Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone! I'm new to the world of CNC router work and need some help getting started. I have purchased my new ShapeOkO XXL and Vcarve pro. Looking for bit selection and place to purchase without breaking the bank! Lol For starters I'm just going to be doing some simple signs with text and maybe some filigree. Will get into 3D at a later date. Any help will be greatly appreciated. Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,371 Posts
Toolstoday.com - free shipping - Amana bits

Hartvilletool.com - free shipping - Whiteside bits

thinkandtinker.com or precisebits.com (same place) little more pricey but good stuff

Just buy individual bits as you need them - don't need a set

1/4" and 1/8" end mill
60 and 90 degree V carve

All you'll need to start

Then get 1/4 and 1/8" ball nose

Go from there
 

·
Official Greeter
Ross
Joined
·
10,065 Posts
Welcome to the forum.
 

·
Administrator
David
Joined
·
3,982 Posts
Welcome to the forum! When you get a minute complete your profile with first name so we know who we're talking to and it will clear the N/a in the left panel. Add your location while you're at it, please.

Show us some photos of your setup, shop, CNC, etc. We like pictures! :wink:

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
32 Posts
John, (Honesttjohn) is correct. Start out with simple tools and add on later when the projects require it. I started out cutting signs and do so well with them I turned it into a business. Most know what projects they want to make with a CNC before purchasing but I found out 3D projects made from cherry or better wood don't sell well in my area because I would have to charge quite a bit for a sign that took 20 hours to cut. However, People will pay $30 to $80 for a 2D custom sign with their name on it. Go to Etsy and check out what people charge for signs painted from a stencil. Mine look better and sell for less.
Today, I still use the 1/8, 1/4 bits to rough and a 90 v bit to finish.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Hi and welcome. One other place to look is Onsrud. They are one of the worlds leading suppliers of CNC tooling.
 

·
Registered
Mike
Joined
·
3,843 Posts
Welcome to the Router Forums.

Buy what you need and then add to those as you start making different projects. Johns's selection should get you started with sign making and then you can add bits as you progress. Signs are a great way to start, it will help you get use of the design software and the use of your machine.

Don't buy sets of bits, I find that you only use a few of the bits so it is best to save that money and put it toward the bits you will use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Welcome.

I have a Shapeoko 3 and suggest the Shapeoko Wiki is worth a look. They have heaps info there including bits. Most seems to promote Drillman1 on eBay as a reliable seller with good quality bits at very good prices.

If you use Facebook there are two sites there Shapeoko &Nomad users group and CNC for Beginners. The latter is organising a group buy for Vectric software although most seems to suggest using the software that comes with the machine until you get comfortable with it.

There is also the Shapeoko forum but that's not quite as active as the FB group..mores the pity as I hate FB with a passion.

Plenty of free projects on CutRocket to run on your Shapeoko

For videos on YouTube..Winston Moy and Mark Lindsay (sp?).

Finished assembling my SO3 and loaded software on my laptop last night. This weekend it the Hello World test..wish me luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
The eBay seller drillman1 mentioned above has all the bits that @honesttjohn mentioned. There is nothing wrong with any of the brands or stores listed above, but compare prices on the US made Kyocera bits that drillman1 offers. I suggest getting 5 or 10 packs of the 1/8 bits (upcut, downcut and ballnose), and 60° and 90° spiral v-bits.

http://stores.ebay.com/id=2877033?

No affiliation except as a customer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Welcome to the Router Forums.

Buy what you need and then add to those as you start making different projects. Johns's selection should get you started with sign making and then you can add bits as you progress. Signs are a great way to start, it will help you get use of the design software and the use of your machine.

Don't buy sets of bits, I find that you only use a few of the bits so it is best to save that money and put it toward the bits you will use.
This is a good group of knowledgeable people. Wish I would have found them long before. I bought a set of bits with my machine well over $200. have only used 3 of them so far. Well four of them now because I broke an end mill on my very first cut. Looking at ball nose end mills now.
 

·
Administrator
David
Joined
·
3,982 Posts
I use a downcut spiral when I want a very clean cut with no splinters or fuzz on the top side, which means I use downcut on about 90% of what I do on the CNC. I use an upcut spiral when it doesn't matter whether there are splinters or fuzz on the top side and I want to make sure the cut channel doesn't fill up with chips.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
Down spiral bits work great for Profile cuts. They keep the work pressed down against spoilboard (helpful on thin stock). Some people find the chips hold the piece in place and they can avoid using tabs, but I usually leave tabs anyway. Because the bottom of the stock is backed by spoilboard, you should not get too much tear out on bottom.
 

·
Administrator
David
Joined
·
3,982 Posts
so down cut bit, you probably would't want to use as a cutout tool right?
On the contrary, I use one most of the time for a cutout tool. Walnut, in some directions of cut, will pile up in the channel but I just use a small screwdriver and follow the cutting path in the channel to dislodge the chips and make sure they aren't compacted. This, btw, is a completely OSHA approved technique. I'm certain of that... :grin:

David
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top