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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all... (So glad I found this place)

So I started woodworking a little over 2 months ago and I absolutely love it.
Yesterday I purchased a router table to go with the plunge router I purchased last week. I am having issues with making height adjustments. I am having to remove the base plate to make the adjustments then replace the plate to make cuts. There HAS to be an easier way to do this and I am just not figuring it out. I have a Ryobi 180 Plunge Router and the Ryobi Universal Router Table.

Please help i'm going :blink:
 

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Theo
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You read the instructions?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, I have read the instructions. The Router and Table were not purchased together. I have not been able to find anything in either manual on how to make it easier to adjust the height while still being attached to the table. I do know how to adjust the router height when not on the base...but the springs are pretty tight and makes it very difficult to adjust.
 

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John
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Hello and welcome to the router forum.
Not familiar with that router which model is it? you should Definitely not have to take the plate off to adjust the bit height
A lot of us dedicate the router to the table and remove the springs but if you’re going to use it by hand you will have to leave them in.
 

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The manual is very clear about height adjustments in normal use, so I suspect you mean you cant adjust it while in the table?

If you remove the plastic base plate, is there an threaded hole that has no obvious use?
My makita has this and it allows you to use a long threaded bolt which (after drilling a suitable sized hole in the table plate) allows you to adjust height with a screwdriver from above the table. But the bolt was in the kit and it was mentioned in the instructions so maybe you dont have that facility.
Lightly grease the tubes, and if its staying in the table remove the springs to make movement easier.
If the table plate lifts out easily, then thats your cheapest option.
Or you can search "router lift" if you want to spend some serious money.
Or you can surf youtube for lots of ideas including home made and even scissor jacks from your car boot.
 

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Theo
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My preferred method is to just pop the plate off, adjust or whatever, pop the plate back in. As far as I am concerned, faster, and easier than any type of lift.
 

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Hey, Charles; welcome!
The short answer is, plunge bases are for handheld usage and fixed bases are for upside down use in tables, as well as handheld use.
OK, now for the longer answer. Some plunge models like the Bosch 1619EVS come equipped with built in spring lockouts which allow you to run the height up and down without fighting against the column springs. As bob explained others have through-the-base adjustment mechanisms which allow for adjusting height without lifting the router out of the table.
Other brands and models come as package deals with both fixed and plunge bases, for example the Bosch 1617EVSPK...you use the fixed base in your table, and simply release the router from the base and slip it into the plunge base.
You shouldn't ever have to remove the base plate to adjust ht. and if you do, you need to be precise in remounting it exactly centred! There's an inexpensive little accessory which aligns the plate exactly.
This is critical for some operations.
In summary then, ideally you have either two or more routers as described, or a package which does both jobs.
Fair warning; woodworking is a very satisfying craft but it ain't cheap.
Ask away; the members here love to help newbies get off to a safe and rewarding start. You'll often hear members say the only stupid question is the one not asked.
Oh! Please be REALLY careful...routers can bite!!!
 

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1st a couple of assumptions here

Are you trying to adjust the amount of cut for the bit & not trying to adjust the depth the cutter in in the collet? Correct?

Then as stated before try to remove the springs (youtube)

trying to adjust the amount in the collet and/or changing out the cutter
Did you remove the clear shield that is attached to the base? Would make adjustment/change out in situ easier.
Also did you try to rotate the router & base to see if other holes line up when mounting in the table to allow easier access to the collet?
Do you need to get offset/gooseneck wrenches to allow access?
 

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Welcome to the Forum Charles. We hope you enjoy the woodworking passion and learning with practice results in nice projects.
 

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Dan,

I like your comments but I feel I must add the following to your statement woodworking is not cheap. While there are probably many hobbies out there that cost less to perfect than woodworking, there are many that cost way more. I for example have a love of 60s & 70s muscle cars and some 50s hot rods. In the past I enjoyed this hobby but at one point I had to abandon it because of the costs. For example, my 1957 Chevrolet BelAir 2 door hardtop needed a lot of body repairs due to the age and our winter roads here in the east. One quarter panel (rear fender) alone was $1200. I can buy enough wood to build a bedroom set with that much $. Photography and electronics are also quite pricey especially if you follow all the new trends coming out continuously. I have a friend who after retirement got into electronics such as sound systems and TVs and I'm not sure what else, after a couple of years in retirement he was broke and had to go back to work. I have always had a liking for woodworking but I finally took the plunge only after I sold my car and used the proceeds to buy equipment.
Cheers,
Dan
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
WOO HOO...Figured it out.

While it is attached to the base there is a long lag bolt with two hex nuts on it. While it is attached to the base I used a wrench and make quarter turns up and down as needed to make the minor adjustments to raise and lower as needed...

Thanks for all the warm welcomes...Just getting into woodworking and having tons of fun.
 

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WOO HOO...Figured it out.

While it is attached to the base there is a long lag bolt with two hex nuts on it. While it is attached to the base I used a wrench and make quarter turns up and down as needed to make the minor adjustments to raise and lower as needed...

Thanks for all the warm welcomes...Just getting into woodworking and having tons of fun.
As Dan said, the plunge base is not usually made for tables. Most fixed bases have a tiny hex bolt, you can get through a small hole in your plate. And they come with a T-handle. You can make adjustments above the table, after you reach under to unlock.
 

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One other thing that might help, get an offset wrench. The handle has a 1 inch drop to the wrench's head, so it fits down into the opening. I don't know about your table, but most tables have a circular insert that fits into a large opening. You can change the size of opening to fit the bit by changing out the insert. In many cases, you must remove this to fit the wrench in to change the bit.

Another item. Drop a half inch grommet into the collet so the bit shaft rests on the grommet. You don't want the bit to bottom out in the collet, and this extra 1/8th inch of height will make it a little easier to get the wrench in there.

Some routers have a push button shaft lock, others require using two wrenches, one to keep the motor shaft from moving, the other to loosen/tighten the collet. If you have the button, you must reach under to depress this button when changing bits. That's in part why some here like their router attached to a plate they can lift out for bit changes and to set height.

Don't know about how your table works regarding inserts. The 16x32 inch one with green legs looks to have a very odd, diamond shaped dark area. Is that a removable insert? If not, you are up against a hard limit that will take the following action to deal with.

If you can't change the insert, I suggest you consider getting a table top with a mounting plate for the router--the easiest fix. Or you can adapt and/or create your own. Kreg has a plate that has a twist lock insert system that will solve your problem for about $70. You could probably adapt your table to fit it using your router and some guide rails made of 1x3 to guide your router in cutting the exact opening. You would add a second layer under the table (good ply will work. Cut a hole in this about half an inch smaller on each side of the opening than the size of the plate. You can add height adjustment screws to this to level the top of the plate with the top of the table.

Lay the plate on the top and center it. Draw a pencil outline and cut inside that line with a jig saw. Then lay out four pieces of wood right on the pencil lines (or fit to the edges of the plate with some playing cards to give you a tiny amount of wiggle room. Then you cut out the exact shape using about a 1 1/4 inch trim bit (with the bearing at the shaft end). The bearing rides on the four rails you clamped in place, and the cutters are set to cut just a mm or so deeper than the thickness of the plate. Voila, you have a really workable router table with all the modern features (although a little small) Later you can build your own talble using this same method, 2-layer top, exact opening for plate, a well cut 2x4 as a fence to start with.

You will need a 1 1/4 inch long, top bearing trim bit which generally comes with a 1/4 inch shank, which will require you use the 1/4 inch collet adapter. This bit goes for less than $25, and you'll find many uses for it in the future. That and roundover bits in the 1/4, 1/2 and 3/4 sizes, preferably with half inch shanks, which EVERYONE needs to make most projects look finished.

The experience of doing this will give you a considerable boost in confidence in using this most valued woodworking tool. It will be much easier to do than to describe.

Man, this got more detailed than I first intended, but having gone through exactly what you are just now, I figured it might save you some disappointments to go into detail now. The table mounted router is FAR SAFER than using it freehand, so you've already made that wise choice.
 
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