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I am looking for advice on routing for an upcoming project. I just bought a freud lock miter bit to create a lock miter joint on the edge of some 5/8" thick spanish cedar for a humidor i am making. The bit is 2 11/64" wide with a 1/2" shank. What sort of power is the router going to need to turn such a bit, and what features should the table have for this kind of operation (how big should the hole be in the table, does it matter if it is a split fence or singe piece fence, can i get a simple cheap craftsman table top model). Im really just looking for advice on this because my routing experience consists of some free hand work with a 1/2" round over bit.
 

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Hi Chris and welcome to the RouterForums community.
 

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Greetings Chris and welcome to the router forum. Thank you for joining us.
 

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I am looking for advice on routing for an upcoming project. I just bought a freud lock miter bit to create a lock miter joint on the edge of some 5/8" thick spanish cedar for a humidor i am making. The bit is 2 11/64" wide with a 1/2" shank. What sort of power is the router going to need to turn such a bit, and what features should the table have for this kind of operation (how big should the hole be in the table, does it matter if it is a split fence or singe piece fence, can i get a simple cheap craftsman table top model). Im really just looking for advice on this because my routing experience consists of some free hand work with a 1/2" round over bit.
Hi Chris - Welcome to the forum :)
I see from your profile you are just jumping in on this.
With the lock mitre, you run one piece flat on the table and the other on edge. I prefer a split fence but it is best if you have a zero clearance insert for it. The problem with the lock mitre is you have very little edge to guide against once the stock passes the bit as the bit just leaves a razor edge. Many will attach a second piece of stock to the workpiece with double face tape to allow for a guide edge. Obviously the hole in the table needs to be large enough to accomodate the bit, in this case, >2 11/64". As far as power goes, the bigger the better. A 2 1/4 will do fine, just take several passes. I set the fence up for the full depth of cut and put stop blocks behind the fence. I then move the fence forward to make a shallow cut and then move the fence back a bit at a time after each pass until I come up against the stop blocks. Sears has a pretty good router package for around $130 that several members have and seem to like.
Probably the biggest issue, to me, with the lock mitre is making sure the stock is dead flat and of equal size. Access to a planner or thicknesser is a big asset.
I doubt this has covered anywhere near everything. I'm sure some other members will drop in and if you have any more questions, someone is always here.:)

Edit - here is a link to a video demonstration on how to do this thing. The setup blocks shown are a good idea but not absolutely neccessary. Since you are using 5/8" stock, bit height will need to be tweaked a bit anyway as their setup blocks are for 3/4 or 1/2". Yes, 1/16" is a big deal. They also don't even mention the importance of the stock being sized correctly, that is "assumed". Good Luck
http://mlcswoodworking.com/shopsite...ges/bt_lockmiter.html#lock_miter_video_anchor
 

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Hey Chris - A new thread about lock mitre joints just started under "Table Mounted Routing". Highly recommend to watch that.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
John,
Thanks for the response. Do you know what model the sears table is, ive been looking at some of them for my first table as they seem pretty nice for the price. Although the descriptions on sears arent the best....most dont say the diameter on the table hole. Is a table hole (proper term?) of >2 11/64" uncommon? Oh, and thanks for the heads up on the lock miter thread.
thanks,
Chris
 

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Hi

You may want to get a smaller bit (2" OD) that's the big one you have,the video below will show you how to use the bit, it's best to make a fence add on with the profile of the bit cut into the add on fence.(just a clamp on fence made of so 3/4" thick MDF will do the job fine)
I will say the lock miter bit is one of the hardest to setup and use..so always use test stock 1st.

MLCS lock mitre router bits

http://cgi.ebay.com/1-pc-1-2-Shank-...ViewItemQQptZRouters_Bits?hash=item20afa95bbf

http://cgi.ebay.com/1-pc-1-2-Shank-...ViewItemQQptZRouters_Bits?hash=item1e5a9c799c

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I am looking for advice on routing for an upcoming project. I just bought a freud lock miter bit to create a lock miter joint on the edge of some 5/8" thick spanish cedar for a humidor i am making. The bit is 2 11/64" wide with a 1/2" shank. What sort of power is the router going to need to turn such a bit, and what features should the table have for this kind of operation (how big should the hole be in the table, does it matter if it is a split fence or singe piece fence, can i get a simple cheap craftsman table top model). Im really just looking for advice on this because my routing experience consists of some free hand work with a 1/2" round over bit.
 

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John,
Thanks for the response. Do you know what model the sears table is, ive been looking at some of them for my first table as they seem pretty nice for the price. Although the descriptions on sears arent the best....most dont say the diameter on the table hole. Is a table hole (proper term?) of >2 11/64" uncommon? Oh, and thanks for the heads up on the lock miter thread.
thanks,
Chris
Hi Chris, sorry, don't have any idea what the Sears tables are like. Have had my nose out of joint with them for so long it's become comfortable. :laugh:
You might want to consider making your own. Not all that difficult and give you a chance to sharpen your skills. All you need is a chunk of something about the size you want and a plate. Can get a decent router plate from Harbor Freight for about $20 plus ship. Table itself is free with a bit of creativity and some dumpster diving around a home center that sells counter tops. Check out the thread "Wanted, pictures of your router table".
If you want to buy one you can check out Rockler, MLCS woodworking, Hartville tool, Woodcraft and any number of other woodworking outlets. Most will have a router plate with a 3 to 4" hole in them.
Good luck and keep us posted :D
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Im glad i picked one of the hardest bits to work with for my first large routing experience. haha.
If i do make my own table john, what do i do for the fence. would i need to buy a fence and route the guides into the table or is using a simple piece of wood clamped to the table sufficient for my needs on this project.
My concern with making my own table is the lock miter joints on this humidor are the most critical part of the project and i dont know if my skill level would allow me to create a table accurate enough to recreate reliable results over the course of my project. What are the critical aspects of making this table.
i will continue checking the 'wanted' thread too, hopefully some good stuff will come up.
 

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Im glad i picked one of the hardest bits to work with for my first large routing experience. haha.
If i do make my own table john, what do i do for the fence. would i need to buy a fence and route the guides into the table or is using a simple piece of wood clamped to the table sufficient for my needs on this project.
My concern with making my own table is the lock miter joints on this humidor are the most critical part of the project and i dont know if my skill level would allow me to create a table accurate enough to recreate reliable results over the course of my project. What are the critical aspects of making this table.
i will continue checking the 'wanted' thread too, hopefully some good stuff will come up.
The simple answer to that is "yes". The fence can be as simple or complex as you like. Many here just use a straight board clamped to the table as well as the other end of the spectrum. All you really need is a tall one,perpendicular to the table. If you want to track mount it, just route some grooves for the track. Fairly simple and a good skill exercise. Just practice a bit on some scrap. I did a couple of quickies last nite just clamping straight edges to the workpiece and using them to guide the router base against. The beauty of the fence is no matter where you put it, it will be on tangent, ie; parallel with the bit. Hard to miss.
Hehehehe, I can relate to your feeling about the lock mitre. It was one of the first ones I got to cause I thought it was kool. Wasn't till I went to use it I found out it was smarter than I was:sarcastic:
 

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Chris, I must point out that a table with all the bells and whistles is nice when posting pictures and some people seem to spend a lifetime adding features to their tables, but believe me, it's all totally unnecessary. A simple flat table with a router mounted beneath and a nice tall fence like this one which is so easy to make is capable of producing the finest of projects. One other thing, once you have set the lock mitre bit correctly, make and keep a sample and do this each time you use a different thickness wood, this will make subsequent set-ups so quick.
 

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I totally agree with you Harry, by the way that's a great looking table you have.

Just wondering about how much does that MDF cost there now, it used to be inexpensive here in the US but the last time I noticed it was about $32.00 US. That's crazy to me, I mean you can get a sheet of shop grade plywood for just a little more.
 
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