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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
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Got this in my email this morning. Woodpecker's bright red jigs are always fun to look at, including their newest offering, a thin rip guide that's built like a tank. $130 is pretty spendy, but as with most Woodpecker products it's thoroughly, if not overly, engineered. It has a double set of small wheels so it should hold even fairly thick material just right. I do like that you can align the little plastic covers on the scale. That's a nice feature.

I have the Rockler version which is $40. It works fine for what I use it for, for example cutting strips to cover the edges of plywood shelves, cutting material for splines.

The reason for using a jig like this is that it allows you to set up the width of strip you want, then by moving the fence to snug the wood against the jig. It is never a good idea to trap your cut between the blade and fence, so this is safer. Having been hit once by a kickback, I'm a believer in the danger (2 months of pain teaches a good lesson). Here's a little video of this jig in use.
 

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Thanks for the info and insight Tom. I've often looked at Rockler's and others Thin Rip Guides but don't cut enough thin slices to justify the cost of the jig. It's definitely handy and safe. BTW I wish I made Woodpecker money :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info and insight Tom. I've often looked at Rockler's and others Thin Rip Guides but don't cut enough thin slices to justify the cost of the jig. It's definitely handy and safe. BTW I wish I made Woodpecker money :(
I used to make Woodpecker money.
 

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I made my own along those lines but that looks amazing. I like cutting strips that way the best. I cut thin strips for whirligig propellor blades as well as the use that you mentioned.
 

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That is really nice, but there are much cheaper options, but if you use a narrow rip guide often then I do like stepping up and paying the money for Woodpeckers because it's always great quality
Welcome to the fun. I have two Woodpecker items. Their extra thick aluminum plate for my router table, and their fence gauge, which is tremendous for table saw setup. Beside their over-kill engineering, I like the bright red color. I like good looking tools.
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You can't go wrong with Woodpecker tools...just broke$$. I have accumulated many Woodpecker tools over the years and have NEVER regretted spending the money. I might have bit my lip numerous times just before clicking on the "Buy" button however. Incra tools are another brand that had had their hand in my wallet for years....but I have never regretted buying quality.
 

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I looked at the Woodpecker thin strip rip jig a few day ago. I have a few of their tools and they are of good quality. The red anodizing (or whatever coating) on some of their squares is not color fast; they have faded in my shop even though they get no direct sun.

I am in the middle of doing a string inlay project in which the inlay groove is made by a 1/16" diameter router bit. Due to the fact that the router bit shaft may be slightly bent, the actual width is a few thousandths bigger than 1/16". I don't know if the Woodpecker jig will allow this kind of precision but the attached photo shows how it was able to rip the string inlay to fit the groove. First, rip the stock so that you have a good edge; do not move the rip fence yet. Next, collect gauge blocks to represent the saw blade kerf (no, it is not precisely 1/8") plus the slot width. In the photo, you can see a 1/8" gauge block (approximate saw blade kerf), a 1/16" gauge block (nominal router bit diameter), and a feeler gauge so that the finished slot width is the desired value. The magnetic stop block is temporarily held in place until a clamp can firmly lock it in place along with the gauge block/feeler gauge assembly. The clamp is critical because even with strong magnets, bumping the stop block with the fence can move the stop block. Don't ask how I know this! Remove the gauge block/feeler gauge assembly and slide the fence over to the stop block. You can adjust the thickness a thousandths of an inch at a time.
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