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Hi guys. This is a GREAT forum with a lot of great info. I've been dabbling with woodworking projects over the last few years.. I have a small table saw, scroll saw, and a Dremel. The Dremel I have used as both table router and hand-held router with the additional accessories. That's great for small hobby type projects, but i wanted to get into bigger badder things. Looked around and found at Lowes a Ryobi router combo for 99! Got it together and it is a nice little setup. I'd recommend... My only complaint is that the router didn't come with an edge guide. :cray: They do sell it as a separate accessory for an extra 20. I'll definitly have to get it for this project tho.

Anywho, my main question is jigs. I would rather make my own, but I haven't really found much info. The project I am christening my new router with is a bunk bed/desk for my daughter. Most of the cuts are straight forward (channel cuts and edges), but there will be several lap joints where either 2x4 or 2x6 will cross. I decided on lap joints as these are clean looking, strong, and just have a pro look. So I'll be using the router to cut these 1/2 depth cuts 4" or 6" wide. Any pointers for this job? The table is fairly small and I believe that using the table for these cuts will be difficult at best.

Are there any good sources for homemade jigs? Google found some here and there, but I'd like to find a listing of easy to make jigs in one place. Figured you folks would know better than Google on this one. :) This will also be the first furniture project and the largest I have ever done. Down the road I'd like to do graphics/lettering but that will be a while. :) Thanks for any info!!!
-K
 

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When you browse the forums look at the left side of the screen, under the name of the poster and you will see "view so-and-sos gallery". Those are the pictures that the poster had inserted into their post. The gallery is a wealth of all the projects, including jigs and templates, that the poster made.
 

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Welcome to the RouterForums Keith. Glad you joined up.
 

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a Ryobi router combo for 99! Got it together and it is a nice little setup. I'd recommend.
How are you liking the combo? I just got the same combo this year and so far have just used it on the table. Probably will keep it table mounted as I just got a little surprise last week of a plunge router.

My only problems with it have been that the fence could go further back, the miter slot isn't a standard 3/4" and that I am getting tired of taking out and putting those two little screws back in to cover the opening around the bit opening on the side of the router every time I change bits.

Outside of those things I really have liked it so far. I would have had the fence complaint on all of the router/table combos that were in my budget range at the time (super low). It has made me aware of a lot of things I want to do when I make my own table (already got everything but a plate, waiting for warm weather to route in the t-tracks since it is melamine and I don't want to route the mdf center inside) like a longer in and out feed, more room to back the fence away from the router and if I can, a little light under the table so I can see better if I am still doing under the table bit changes.

but there will be several lap joints where either 2x4 or 2x6 will cross. I decided on lap joints as these are clean looking, strong, and just have a pro look. So I'll be using the router to cut these 1/2 depth cuts 4" or 6" wide.
As for making your lap joints I always found using a table saw or circular saw worked good for doing that on larger pieces of wood. Make a mark how far you want the cut to go, set the blade depth to the correct height then run it across the table saw blade several times moving it over a bit each time. Or the same with the circular saw. Then when you have lots of thin little pieces use a chisel (or even a hammer) to knock off the pieces. If it is a bit rough because of the cuts or pieces didn't break off even use a sanding drum on the dremel to clean it up.

Should also be able to set up the router with a temporary guide system and do basically the same thing, only instead of making multiple cuts make multiple passes across the board with a router, adjusting the depth each time you have routed off the area. There is probably a jig to do this, I just can't think of the proper name

A harder way to do it (at least to me, plus it seems more dangerous because of the length of the boards) is to treat it almost like cutting a tenon, only you are only cutting the one side of the board, not both. Would mean having the board pointing up in the air, which is why I don't like it with boards long enough to be making a bed, then set the tenon jig (which you need to make to do the cut) and do it that way. Since I don't have a tenon jig some one else would have to explain how to do it that way.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
NiceG316 said:
LOL! Speaking of neighbors, I live in Centerville, OH!
Hello! :) Wonder how many more folks from the area are here...

How are you liking the combo? I just got the same combo this year and so far have just used it on the table. Probably will keep it table mounted as I just got a little surprise last week of a plunge router.

My only problems with it have been that the fence could go further back, the miter slot isn't a standard 3/4" and that I am getting tired of taking out and putting those two little screws back in to cover the opening around the bit opening on the side of the router every time I change bits.
So far I like it. I do agree that the fence could move farther. So far I haven't really needed more room than the fence allows.... I can see this changing in the future tho, at which time I will need to upgrade (build) a bigger/better table. Until then this should suffice. As for the little chip guard, yeah, that could have been designed better. One screw will hold it place, but that does of course weaken it slightly....

As for making your lap joints I always found using a table saw or circular saw worked good for doing that on larger pieces of wood. Make a mark how far you want the cut to go, set the blade depth to the correct height then run it across the table saw blade several times moving it over a bit each time. Or the same with the circular saw. Then when you have lots of thin little pieces use a chisel (or even a hammer) to knock off the pieces. If it is a bit rough because of the cuts or pieces didn't break off even use a sanding drum on the dremel to clean it up.

Should also be able to set up the router with a temporary guide system and do basically the same thing, only instead of making multiple cuts make multiple passes across the board with a router, adjusting the depth each time you have routed off the area. There is probably a jig to do this, I just can't think of the proper name
Using a table saw is an option, but the table saw I have is about the same size as as this router table, so cutting large boards in such a precise maner is difficult. My circular isn't adjustable for depth. What i was thinking was making a jig I can clamp onto the boards that allows for the width of the routers base and simply make a few passes manually. The jig would make sure my cuts are straight. I haven't seen any such DIY jigs so I'll just have to make it myself.
 

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What i was thinking was making a jig I can clamp onto the boards that allows for the width of the routers base and simply make a few passes manually. The jig would make sure my cuts are straight. I haven't seen any such DIY jigs so I'll just have to make it myself.

That would work very well and I think that there are jigs on here that will do it. I am just too new to know what they are called.:confused:

I've never seen a circular saw that won't adjust depth, but then I have really only seen our own, my dads, my father-in-laws and a buddies that my Wife helped him pick out the night we forgot to bring ours over. So again, my lack of experience shows.

I do understand having too small of a table saw though, as my old one is a small bench top model. I did used to set up things to support larger pieces of wood but it just wasn't something I really liked to use. I normally would ask my Wife to cut it with the circular saw instead.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I've never seen a circular saw that won't adjust depth, but then I have really only seen our own, my dads, my father-in-laws and a buddies that my Wife helped him pick out the night we forgot to bring ours over. So again, my lack of experience shows.
No, that would be MY inexperience showing... lol. It does have a depth adjustment, I was just too dim to find it. This is my first circ. saw. I've used my dads in the past, but only maybe once or twice.

This is the method I have used (instead of the router) to make the lap joints. So far it's coming alone ok. I will post some pics when it's completed. I am working on the legs now, the mattress box is completed. Then just a matter of stain and assemble. :moil:

BTW Derek, off topic, what distro you use?
 

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No, that would be MY inexperience showing... lol. It does have a depth adjustment, I was just too dim to find it. This is my first circ. saw. I've used my dads in the past, but only maybe once or twice.
I have that 'too dim to find it' problem almost everytime I use my brother's craftsman router that has the spindle lock at the top of the router. It will often be a couple of years inbetween uses or the need to change a bit in it. The last time took me 2 hours and then internet searching for a manual.


BTW Derek, off topic, what distro you use?
Not sure what you mean by distro? ISP? Linux version? Service Host?

Comcast and the latest fedora I think, but might be a few behind, not checked and a friend who is a legit linux expert takes care of the upgrading for me now along with the firewall and all of that stuff.
 

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I used to run slackware back in the days of it being 50 floppies to get it. Got it using ftp over email that was then converted to the format my system could read by waffle and then had to run the uuencoder/decoder to get the floppies written.

Then I ran debian until I was hacked into. At that time I switched over to red hat as that is what my buddy who used to be a sys-admin at a university super computer center ran and new best (plus he didn't like debians package selector at the time, which I am one of the few people I have ever heard of that did like it...dselect was the selector). He tightened down my system so that only select addresses could get in and the rest would just sit there and wait for a response. When I finally started getting back into using the internet we opened up some ports for various programs, but still keep everything hidden behind a linux box that does all of the routing for the home network. The wired and wireless routers are just used as switch boxes.

I am very anxious for the new house especially if we build it all. I want to run conduit or chases everywhere with extra wires to leave room for expansion and make it so that every room in the house can hook up to the home network or to the home tv distribution (and hopefully music too). Even if we end up buying a house I want to take some time to do cable and conduit runs to all of the rooms as I am tired of not having what I want in the various rooms of this house and the inability to change a lot of because of how things are arranged. Would take a lot of work to do. Much easier in an empty house even if it is completely finished and I have to cut into things. Will just need to repair and vacuum then. Now it would be re-arrange the room, do the runs and the cuts, clean up, put everything back...just too much work for what I want.
 

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WOW...I bet that process took forever..... That takes some serious patience... I've been using MS since DOS (tho it wasn't 50 floppies worth lol). My first foray into Linux was about 04 when I got a free copy of Linspire. It was debian based, and horrid. Glad I gave Linux another chance a few years later. :)

I agree that a furnished house would be a hassle to wire. Having a basement makes that jobs a LOT easier too. Another option you have right now that would involve NO wiring and would make your entire house a network is a power-line setup that uses your houses wiring. For the price it's unbeatable. You can use it as a computer network AND you can connect your TV/stereo and make a full media friendly house.

Newegg.com - Powerline, Powerline Adapter, Ethernet Bridge, USB Powerline Adapter, Powerline Networking Kit, Powerline Ethernet Adapter

Newegg has a ton of accessories to do this.

I used to run slackware back in the days of it being 50 floppies to get it. Got it using ftp over email that was then converted to the format my system could read by waffle and then had to run the uuencoder/decoder to get the floppies written.

Then I ran debian until I was hacked into. At that time I switched over to red hat as that is what my buddy who used to be a sys-admin at a university super computer center ran and new best (plus he didn't like debians package selector at the time, which I am one of the few people I have ever heard of that did like it...dselect was the selector). He tightened down my system so that only select addresses could get in and the rest would just sit there and wait for a response. When I finally started getting back into using the internet we opened up some ports for various programs, but still keep everything hidden behind a linux box that does all of the routing for the home network. The wired and wireless routers are just used as switch boxes.

I am very anxious for the new house especially if we build it all. I want to run conduit or chases everywhere with extra wires to leave room for expansion and make it so that every room in the house can hook up to the home network or to the home tv distribution (and hopefully music too). Even if we end up buying a house I want to take some time to do cable and conduit runs to all of the rooms as I am tired of not having what I want in the various rooms of this house and the inability to change a lot of because of how things are arranged. Would take a lot of work to do. Much easier in an empty house even if it is completely finished and I have to cut into things. Will just need to repair and vacuum then. Now it would be re-arrange the room, do the runs and the cuts, clean up, put everything back...just too much work for what I want.
 

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Thought I'd share with you the progress I have so far. There's still a long way to go.

The first pic is the whole thing. The 2x4 across the bottom is just laying on there, but once cut it will be atached in that general area for added stability. The rails on the very top have yet to be cut and will be bolted using the same connector bolts as seen in pic 2 (thanks for that advice BJ!). Those upper rails look like they way too high, but her mattress is thick at 10 inches. So the top of the mattress is about 7.5" above the box, and about 4 below that rail (maybe just a shy less). Pic 3 of the underside of the box. I used the Ryobi router to cut a groove for the plywood bottom to slide into. While it turned out OK, if you look close you'll be able to tell the cut was terribly smooth. I think I fed the 2x6's across the table a little too fast. At least the uneveness of that will be hidden on the bottom....

I actually quite happy with how this is turning out so far. I kow it's not as good as the stuff you guys make, but I'm still fairly new and this is by FAR the biggest piece I've made, and my first furniture piece.
 

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I'm glad to see that I'm not the only one who has used osb as a bed base.
If I were you, I'd round over the edges on the 'ladder' rungs. Sharp corners are rather uncomfortable on small feet. Actually, even on big feet.
 

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I'd bore some holes in it, too, to let the mattress ventilate. Otherwise you could find mould developing on the underside of the mattress.

Cheers

Peter
 
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