Router Forums banner
1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I've spent a bit of time searching the forum before posting this, so I thought I'd throw it out to any of you veterans out there. Apologies if this is not in the right forum (Mods, feel free to move it to right right spot)

Anyway, I'm just starting out with routing, but I'm the type who would rather research first before jumping in. I'm just a woodworking hobbyist/DIY, so I don't need top of the line tools...yet.

Anyway, I'm in the process of buying my first router and I need some advice/opinions on which model to purchase. I've narrowed it down to the following two models:

The Makita M3600G - $159 (From Mitre10)

Or

The Ryobi RRT1600-S - $149 (from Bunnings)

(I'd post a link to these, but I don't have enough posts up yet)

The price difference is only about $10, so price is not really a deciding factor here. From what I've learnt, these are mid-range for a DIY type person. I've seen one thread that compared the Ryobi to a Bosch 1/4" one, and hands-down, the Bosch was voted the better one; however, I'm after a 1/2" router.

So, has anyone heard much about the Makita one? I've been searching everywhere online for some sort of review (especially on YouTube), but there doesn't seem to be much on at all. I've been told that Makita is very reliable, but does this also apply to their MT series?

The way I see it, each one has its good points in terms of purchasing:

Makita
- reliable brand name
- buying from Mitre10 looks pretty safe (400 stores in Australia)
- good price
- seems to include a lot of good accessories (ie guides, straight edges, etc)

Ryobi
- easy to purchase from Bunnings
- a tad cheaper ($10)
- I have Ryobi drills and driver and circ saw, and have never had a problem with them
- Ryobi are offering a 4 year warranty with all corded tools (registering them online)

So, for a hobbyist/DIYer like myself, which way should I go?

Anyone's help would be appreciated.

Regards,

DiverDoug
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,224 Posts
Whichever you choose, consider getting one with a half inch (12mm) collet. You can get a 1/4 inch collet for it. Get a full power (2.25 hp) rather than a smaller 1hp trim router. The smaller router is handy for limited use, but not up to things you'll do later.

Make sure the kit includes a plunge type base, it will cost a lot more to buy it separately later rather than getting the kit.

I don't have many Makita tools, but the ones I have are OK.

If you plan to use this in a table, I would think several times about Bosch. The 1617 is what we have in the USA, but there is an equivalent in OZ, just don't recall the model number. The Bosch fixed base can be used in a table.

Table routing is much safer in general than freehand. And all you need is a flat chunk of ply and a straight pine board to use as a fence. That will get you going and you can add to it later rather than pony up lots of money for a commercial table. You may be able to find a second hand table or dresser you can use for your table.

Bosch has a small handle that will allow you to adjust bit height. It must be purchased separately but is inexpensive. Picture attached of the Bosch setup.

As with many others here, I am a real fan of Bosch. Nothing against most other brands, but I can vouch for the value, ruggedness and quality of Bosch from personal experience. But soon, others will speak up about their choice of router, so you'll get a well rounded set of recommendations.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for that. I had a search online and according to Bosch's aussie website, there's only one table/plunge router available and it's about $530, so that's waaaaay past my budget at this point. If I was looking at becoming a cabinet maker, then it's something I'd consider. The only other non-trim router from Bosch that I could find was the POF 1200 AE. It seems to have got some high praise here, but it is only a 1/4" collet and 1200W motor.

From what I've found, the Ryobi is a 2HP one with a 1/2" collet, so it appears to have a bit of grunt behind it. It is also multispeed, which I'm sure will be handy for different types of cuts. The Makita is 50w more powerful and has a 60mm plunge depth (vs 55mm with the Ryobi), but is about 2kg heavier and only one speed (22,000 rpm).

I do intend to set up a router table, although I can buy a cheap one for only $55 from where I'd buy the Ryobi from. Then again, I also like the challenge of buildign one myself, and there's a huge number of YT vids to get ideas from.

Thanks again for your input!

Diver Doug
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,998 Posts
I have three makita routers, one bosch, and 1 powerplus.
The powerplus is absolute rubbish though.

I have a 1/2" makita in a table and it is absolutely faultless, even without variable speed (and bear in mind that if you fit a variable speed router in a table you either have to crawl underneath each time you want to adjust, or buy a complicated remote speed control).

I have a ryobi mitre saw, and the quality of that is not up to makita.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,625 Posts
My choice would be for the variable speed...you will need it for different bit sizes and woods/materials...

I would consider variable speed a discriminating factor.

If you decide on the Makita, you should be able to get an external speed control.

Good luck...
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Harry Sinclair is one our most experienced “routologists” (his expression) and he lives in Perth and his weapons of choice are Makita. I might add that my main routers are Hitachi and I know that some at least are made in the same factory as the same model Makita. Forget the 50 Watts difference. That part is virtually inconsequential.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,224 Posts
Somewhere along the line, I got a simple external speed control, then learned that the Bosch has it built in. It is really just a rheostat. The speed control is needed mostly to reduce RPMs when you're using a larger bit, which should have a half inch shank.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,998 Posts
I know the theory of variable speed, but in practice I use my makita RP1801 fixed speed in the table. I use every bit from a 3 mm straight double flute, to a trend box joint cutter
https://www.trenddirectuk.com/866x1-2tc
in woods as different as soft construction timber to all the hardwoods like indian rosewood, bubinga, teak, walnut, beech, zebrano, etc, etc, and I have never had any problem.
Even the yonico birdmouth cutter,
https://www.amazon.com/Yonico-15137-Birds-Router-2-Inch/dp/B00KZM26YG
which is a fair weight of metal, works perfectly, even if it does make a really impressive wind roar noise.

Sometimes its worth it to just suck it and see.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Hi all,

I'm just starting out with routing, but I'm the type who would rather research first before jumping in. I'm just a woodworking hobbyist/DIY, so I don't need top of the line tools...yet.

Anyway, I'm in the process of buying my first router and I need some advice/opinions on which model to purchase. I've narrowed it down to the following two models:

The way I see it, each one has its good points in terms of purchasing:

Makita
- reliable brand name
- buying from Mitre10 looks pretty safe (400 stores in Australia)
- good price
- seems to include a lot of good accessories (ie guides, straight edges, etc)

Ryobi
- easy to purchase from Bunnings
- a tad cheaper ($10)
- I have Ryobi drills and driver and circ saw, and have never had a problem with them
- Ryobi are offering a 4 year warranty with all corded tools (registering them online)

So, for a hobbyist/DIYer like myself, which way should I go?

Anyone's help would be appreciated.

Regards,

DiverDoug
Doug,

I have just gone through the same thing, I wanted a decent powered 1/2" router which was cheap, (didn't want to pay $400 - $500), so I narrowed it down to the same two or a used Hitachi TR-12 which are getting long in the tooth now.

I looked at the Ryobi, which seems like a toy to me, and the Makita seemed very well made, so I purchased the Makita from TotalTools for the same price you have seen, it's the same every where.

It will roar through everything I throw at it, the collet has no play at all, it has spindle lock and comes with a Makita 1/2" straight bit, 1/4" reducer sleeve, straight guide and a circular guide etc.

It's single speed but if you won't be using bits larger than 30mm diameter the 22,000rpm no load speed is fine IMO (I have tried it with a lock mitre bit and cut fine as well). No soft start but mine is in a router table so no problem with that either. I plan to build a Silicon Chip soft start speed controller later on so that won't be a problem with larger bits either.

The only bad things about this router is that plunge mechanism can bind, this is if you push down on one handle only it will tend to bind a bit, it won't if you press down on both handles or even gently press on the top with one handle, the springs in the Makita are not nearly as strong as my Bosch router which I put down as the cause of this. I have a lift in my table so it's not a problem for me and wouldn't be a problem using it free hand. The other thing for using it free hand is that it has a switch like the older Makita's and the Hitachi TR-12, so you can turn it on and leave it on, which is fine for table use, on my Bosch you have to press in a button and pull the trigger switch to get it to work, which is an extra safety feature.

Overall though, the Makita M3600G is a bargain IMO, great power, no comparison to my 1200watt Bosch (either Bosch are overstating or Makita are understating theirs), seems like double that to me, solid build, great depth adjustment. For that money I wouldn't hesitate buying one again.

https://www.totaltools.com.au/109044-makita-mt-series-1650w-1-2-plunge-router-m3600g

No Affiliation
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
If possible or feasible, I would recommend the DeWalt 618PK, Bosch 1617EVSPK, or the Porter Cable 895PK. They all are 2.25HP, have EVS, come with 1/4" (6mm) and 1/2" (12mm) collets, and come with a fixed base and plunge bases so you have the flexibility to do multiple routing applications. I use the PC for some light router table work. Be careful of the slippery slope. I started with the PC 690 fixed base router and now I have it as well as the PC 895PK, DW 618PK, DW 621, DW 625, Milwaukee 5625, and Bosch Colt PR-20. I no longer have the Bosch because someone made me an offer I couldn't refuse for it.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Orlando the OP is in Australia and those North American models don’t work there because of the different power system they have. I have seen lately other people suggest that a 6mm bit will chuck in a 1/4” collet and a 12mm chuck in a 1/2” collet. They don’t and to tighten a collet down on one of those would probably damage the collet and still not grip it tightly enough. I have a bit that is 6mm that I thought was a 1/4 “ and it’s extremely sloppy in 1/4” collet but nice and snug in a 6mm reducer. Pat Warner once stated what he felt was the maximum deviation for tolerance in shaft diameter and I know it was less than 2 thousandths of an inch and 6 and 12mm are both more than that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Hypnotoad

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Orlando the OP is in Australia and those North American models don’t work there because of the different power system they have. I have seen lately other people suggest that a 6mm bit will chuck in a 1/4” collet and a 12mm chuck in a 1/2” collet. They don’t and to tighten a collet down on one of those would probably damage the collet and still not grip it tightly enough. I have a bit that is 6mm that I thought was a 1/4 “ and it’s extremely sloppy in 1/4” collet but nice and snug in a 6mm reducer. Pat Warner once stated what he felt was the maximum deviation for tolerance in shaft diameter and I know it was less than 2 thousandths of an inch and 6 and 12mm are both more than that.
I agree, there is a huge difference, I bought a 6mm solid carbide 4 flute spiral bit and it cuts beautifully, I have separate 6mm and 1/4" collets for my Bosch router and there is no way I would even try and tighten the 1/4" chuck to use the 6mm bit. 1/4" is 6.35mm from memory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts

·
Premium Member
Retired since June 2000
Joined
·
15,065 Posts
I am a Makita guy from way, way back and have three different models. If you were to invest in a Makita RP2301FC It will perform any and every task now and in the future. However, if you would like me to choose between the two that you have shown I must reluctantly suggest the RYOBI because it has a multi step turret, which, when you become familiar with the finer points of routing you will find it to be a very important feature. Other than that, as mentioned, the power is very similar and I once had an earlier model Ryobi router which worked just fine.
This shot shows my Makita RP2301FC after I made a multi-step turret for it.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
357 Posts
Get the Makita but spend AUD40 on external speed controller

Hi all,

I've spent a bit of time searching the forum before posting this, so I thought I'd throw it out to any of you veterans out there. Apologies if this is not in the right forum (Mods, feel free to move it to right right spot)

Anyway, I'm just starting out with routing, but I'm the type who would rather research first before jumping in. I'm just a woodworking hobbyist/DIY, so I don't need top of the line tools...yet.

Anyway, I'm in the process of buying my first router and I need some advice/opinions on which model to purchase. I've narrowed it down to the following two models:

The Makita M3600G - $159 (From Mitre10)

Or

The Ryobi RRT1600-S - $149 (from Bunnings)

(I'd post a link to these, but I don't have enough posts up yet)

The price difference is only about $10, so price is not really a deciding factor here. From what I've learnt, these are mid-range for a DIY type person. I've seen one thread that compared the Ryobi to a Bosch 1/4" one, and hands-down, the Bosch was voted the better one; however, I'm after a 1/2" router.

So, has anyone heard much about the Makita one? I've been searching everywhere online for some sort of review (especially on YouTube), but there doesn't seem to be much on at all. I've been told that Makita is very reliable, but does this also apply to their MT series?

The way I see it, each one has its good points in terms of purchasing:

Makita
- reliable brand name
- buying from Mitre10 looks pretty safe (400 stores in Australia)
- good price
- seems to include a lot of good accessories (ie guides, straight edges, etc)

Ryobi
- easy to purchase from Bunnings
- a tad cheaper ($10)
- I have Ryobi drills and driver and circ saw, and have never had a problem with them
- Ryobi are offering a 4 year warranty with all corded tools (registering them online)

So, for a hobbyist/DIYer like myself, which way should I go?

Anyone's help would be appreciated.

Regards,

DiverDoug
Get the Makita but be prepared to spend another AUD40 on external speed controller later.
Makita makes better more accurate tools that usually last longer and they have better resale value.
The Makita model you choose however does not have variable speed so be prepared to spend another $30-40 on an external speed controller.
e.g.
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/8A-220V...176993108?epid=7017330068&hash=item4b3ed99154
The speed controller can also be use for your corded drill or belt sander or angle grinder or shopvac too so it would be a good investment anyway.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DesertRatTom

·
Registered
Steve
Joined
·
2,018 Posts
What did you go with in the end?

Just curious
I have the Ryobi RRT1600 and love it as a plunge router, but now I want to put an inexpensive router in a table to expand options and learning and the Ryobi isn't really table suitable because of the lack of power controls (unable to lock the trigger on).

I'm about to pull the trigger on the Makita M3600G at Total Tools (maybe tomorrow) if it has a lockable on switch.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
You can get around the switch issue by using a cable tie or duct tape to lock it on and then installing a remote switch setup. The simplest version of that would be a light switch that energizes a stand plug in.

The only router models I know of with trigger switches are the D handled ones anyway. All the rest have either a push/pull or toggle type switch. You could also use a foot switch. I have one I use occasionally.
 
  • Like
Reactions: DesertRatTom
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top