Router Forums banner

This guy's a nut!

  • Yes, it can be done!

    Votes: 1 50.0%
  • No, it's impossible!

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Pulled pork sammich!

    Votes: 1 50.0%
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi everyone.
This is my first post, and I'll admit right off the bat that I'm a router newb.
I'll also tell you I don't always do things normally.

I live in the middle of nowhere AZ, and hate traveling to the cities for little things I may need on a whim, so quite often I'll make do with what I have.

I'm building a router table, and have a Jessem mast r lift II coming in tomorrow.
Watching a bunch of installation videos, it appears some purchase the template, while others make a template using the double sided tape method, and use like a 1 1/2" forstner bit for the corners.

I just purchased a Dewalt 618 with the multiple bases, and also Freud's 13 piece can't get the bits out set of bits.

The flush trim bit included in the set is a bottom bearing bit, so I guess that's a no go for this plate mounting job.

I don't feel like shelling out the money for a template, nor waiting a week or 10 days for Amazon to show up with yet another set of bits.
I also don't feel like waiting the same lead time for a set of guide bushings.

What's to say a guy couldn't trace out the plate, use a forstner for the corners, and cut the inset using a straight bit and an edge guide?
OR....
What about routering out the hole, then going after it with a rabbeting bit?

Thanks for any thoughts or input!

Joe
 

·
Registered
Paul
Joined
·
2,143 Posts
Often people have a lip in the bottom of the cavity to support the plate. There's Kreg adjustable corner brackets available but that's another shopping trip. It's important to get the plate flush to the top. Maybe if you use your forstner and only drill to the depth of the plate, then leave the corners when you cut out the rest of the square. If you want to route the main cavity, it would probably be a good idea to cut close to the line with a jigsaw then just clean it up with the router.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,829 Posts
Hi everyone.
This is my first post, and I'll admit right off the bat that I'm a router newb.
I'll also tell you I don't always do things normally.

I live in the middle of nowhere AZ, and hate traveling to the cities for little things I may need on a whim, so quite often I'll make do with what I have.

I'm building a router table, and have a Jessem mast r lift II coming in tomorrow.
Watching a bunch of installation videos, it appears some purchase the template, while others make a template using the double sided tape method, and use like a 1 1/2" forstner bit for the corners.

I just purchased a Dewalt 618 with the multiple bases, and also Freud's 13 piece can't get the bits out set of bits.

The flush trim bit included in the set is a bottom bearing bit, so I guess that's a no go for this plate mounting job.

I don't feel like shelling out the money for a template, nor waiting a week or 10 days for Amazon to show up with yet another set of bits.
I also don't feel like waiting the same lead time for a set of guide bushings.

What's to say a guy couldn't trace out the plate, use a forstner for the corners, and cut the inset using a straight bit and an edge guide?
OR....
What about routering out the hole, then going after it with a rabbeting bit?

Thanks for any thoughts or input!

Joe
Another idea is to trace the plate on to your router table, use your jig saw to cut a tight fit for the plate (sand fit it in). Around the four sides of the hole attach 1/2" wood strips low/high enough to have the plate level with the table. To know where to put the wood strips screw the plate to a 2x4 leaving the 2x4 on top. Slide the plate in the hole with the 2x4 now on top of the table. Go underneath and attach the wood strips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
At this point reading and getting know the router would be a good ideal. You could purchase a router template guide set and plunge bit and take advantage of pattern cutting.....many will never understand templates...

I spent 30 years cabineg making and just used a router. When I started building furniture I had to understand the features on a router. Made a difference. ..
Product Metal Rectangle Plastic Machine
Wood stain Plywood Paint Cabinetry Design
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
At this point reading and getting know the router would be a good ideal. You could purchase a router template guide set and plunge bit and take advantage of pattern cutting.....many will never understand templates...

I spent 30 years cabineg making and just used a router. When I started building furniture I had to understand the features on a router. Made a difference. ..
View attachment 396560 View attachment 396561
Thanks again for the info!
I decided to take the plunge ( ar, ar ar) and ordered the template and a guide bearing kit.
Might as well do it right.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3 Posts
Good choice BBQJoe. Takes all the guess work out of cutting out the right size hole. Like you, I just bought the same router lift and building the router table. My routers are not top of the line and couldn't find the guide bushings that would fit them so decided to make my own template and use a template bit with a top bearing. I started with a 1/4" hardboard and drew out the outline of the lift plate. The corners on my lift plate worked out to be 1 5/8" . I used a hole saw with that diameter and cut out the four corners then a jig saw to cut out close to the line. Then I used a 3/4" strip of plywood as a straight edge and used a 1/4" bit with a top bearing to trim the edges between the corners. Just needed a little sanding to smooth some of the curves but it fit like a glove with about 1/32" play but easy in and out. I then used that template to route out a thicker pattern. I used a 3/4" piece of plywood with extra width and length to give me an area to clamp it to the table (not sure I trust carpet tape as yet). I did that to give me some height to guide the bearing bit down into table top. For the depth you will go will require multiple of passes so the height is needed and couldn't get that with my first 1/4" pattern. I plan to leave a 3/4" lip for the plate to sit on and a little deeper than the thickness of the plate to give room for the leveling screws. I've seen where some have fabricated a metal insert to set on the lip so the levelers don't sink into the wood during use, which will lead to continual leveling problems. There are four corner machine bolts that hold the plate secure once it is level. You may need to install inserts for them to screw into or drill straight through and use longer bolts with a fender washer and nut. I haven't gotten that far yet but the slot for the plate should be a little deeper than the plate thickness. NOTE: the Kreg corner leveler attachments are NOT meant for the Jess 'em as the bolt holes do not line up. Jess 'em sells their own corner plates.

I'm new at this as well and stumbling through the process. I'm wondering if the plate should go right in the middle of the table or a bit to the back for more table room or closer to the front. I haven't cut the hole for the plate yet and still wondering if a bearing bit can be plunged or do I drill a starter hole Guess I just have to give it a go on a test piece of wood.

Good luck on your project and keep posting as I need the help too.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top