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Discussion Starter #1
The tree had Dutch Elm disease, and had to be taken down.

This is fascinating towatch, reportedly the largest

hardwood tree in
Washington State,
certainly in Seattle, taken down in a
residential
neighborhood.*

The guy in the tree ........ he’s
cool. There is no question that he does
not have a dull
chain.



The lumber from this
tree
is being dried (3 years) before being made
into
furniture.*

*click here: [ame="https://vimeo.com/81240461"]https://vimeo.com/81240461[/ame]






 

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I cut a lot of firewood and a few truckloads of logs back on the farm. Enough to give me a real appreciation for what's involved here. The level of trust and coordination between the guy in the tree and the crane operator. The shear fatigue of using a saw that big in a tree instead of on the ground. A hard job done right. Thanks for posting.
 
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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Wow!
 

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That was amazing! As we're watching it, Ken says he does that on a much smaller level every day (mostly spring and summer). I looked at that and said "F* THAT!!!!" :lol:
 

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Thanks Harry for posting that! It was very interesting and showed the great level of skill required to do work such as this on this scale.
This also was well-produced from the videographer. Elm is an amazing wood to work with and is surprisingly resistant to splitting!

Otis Guillebeau from Auburn, Georgia
 

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the crane operator had his act together...
thanks Harry...
 

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Urban Hardwoods have their own yard and sawmill. They dry the logs minimum of 1 year and then saw them into rough edge slabs and then put them into their warehouse drying room stickered and stacked in sequence with fans blowing air through the room for as much time as is required to reach the moisture content they want.

These are full length/full width of log 2"-6" thick slabs.

Then they sell them or make them into furniture in their own shop. They do a lot of long rough edge conference room tables.

The man that owns the company started many years ago with a borrowed tug boat plying the waters of Puget Sound retrieving logs off the beaches and sawing them into lumber.


Great video, Harry, exciting to see those guys work. They keep busy around this area doing municipal and Parks work.

Herb
 

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Really professional outfit!
 

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I met some guys from Vancouver once that wanted to do the same thing, i.e. take logs from unwanted trees off residential lots and saw them into lumber. They couldn't get permission from the BC Forest Service to do it. So it all gets cut into firewood and burned or taken to a landfill.
 

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Thanks Harry, brought back lots of memories. I supervised tree crews (utility term) for many (25+) years. Note the guy on the tree is young and the crane operator appears to be more "seasoned"! There is a reason for that. :smile:
I agree, the coordination between these two is a life and death matter every minute. A mistake here can career ending or fatal. This is a high injury profession not only for the guy on the tree but for the crane operator as well. There are no weight tags on trees so he has to be very careful to not let the trimmer saw off more than the crane can safely lift and maneuver. LOTS of pictures in the utility world of cranes tipped over with a big log on the end of the winch line!
 

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i like watching videos like this but think this is probably the most organized, skilled crew ive seen. even the crane operator. logs strapped up on the tree and when he cuts through they slide off nice and easy-no jerking or swaying like crazy.

and the view up there!
 

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I met some guys from Vancouver once that wanted to do the same thing, i.e. take logs from unwanted trees off residential lots and saw them into lumber. They couldn't get permission from the BC Forest Service to do it. So it all gets cut into firewood and burned or taken to a landfill.
Thats a crying shame, Chuck, You would think that they would tax the stuffing's out of it and claim the lumber after it is cut and dried. :crying::crying::crying:

They might have to get permits here to do it, In most areas trees can't be cut unless there is a permit and/or a clearing permit. Maybe because this tree was designated as diseased they were allowed to cut it.

Herb
 

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Would not have tried that, even as a young'un.......

I started to sway back and forward just sitting at the desk......
 

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Thats a crying shame, Chuck, You would think that they would tax the stuffing's out of it and claim the lumber after it is cut and dried. :crying::crying::crying:

They might have to get permits here to do it, In most areas trees can't be cut unless there is a permit and/or a clearing permit. Maybe because this tree was designated as diseased they were allowed to cut it.

Herb
Vancouver also, Herb. The City sends out a City Arborist to assess the situation. They're really opposed to developers and owners cutting trees down without an extremely good reason. If an owner does it anyway, it gets very expensive very quickly. They also make them replace what the destroyed.

"Property development and trees

Unless a tree requires removal under one of the conditions listed above, all property development (renovation or new building) requires you to retain existing trees located on your property.

All trees to be retained on the site require protection during any construction or development. All trees on adjacent properties or boulevard trees that are in danger of being damaged must be protected as well.

An arborist's report is required to make a development permit application."


Protection of Trees Bylaw 9958 | City of Vancouver
 

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Vancouver also, Herb. The City sends out a City Arborist to assess the situation. They're really opposed to developers and owners cutting trees down without an extremely good reason. If an owner does it anyway, it gets very expensive very quickly. They also make them replace what the destroyed.

"Property development and trees

Unless a tree requires removal under one of the conditions listed above, all property development (renovation or new building) requires you to retain existing trees located on your property.

All trees to be retained on the site require protection during any construction or development. All trees on adjacent properties or boulevard trees that are in danger of being damaged must be protected as well.

An arborist's report is required to make a development permit application."


Protection of Trees Bylaw 9958 | City of Vancouver
Similar rules here, even windfalls sometimes fall under these rules.

It brings back memories of when I was young, we burned wood and we cut up many old growth firs that had been down 50 years or more some were 3'-4' in diameter. They were so fine straight grained they could be split with an axe, just "popped" open. that was before chainsaws and it would take most of the day to get one block cut off with the 2 man crosscut saw. You can't even buy that kind of wood anymore for lumber.

Herb
 

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Wow! Those guys are good. Really good. I have seen some very good crane operators in my day. However, this was a team effort and a good job done by all.

I thought it was funny, the guy took the time to take a picture of his work with the city skyline in the background.
 
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