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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good day

With this method, I get not only nice glue line but also consistent width (and I mean ±0") along the board that is very important for me for 45° frame and various cabinet parts.

The post is divided into 2 parts, the first the old (prototype) setup and the second, the final version.

With the new version (with the wooden fence), I have to touch and set the router bit only once at the initial set-up and after, just to release the straight edge clamps, release 2 knobs, push the new board with the Straight edge to the fence, lock the clamps, turn the knobs and go (it takes only a few seconds), so the wooden fence, is not only acting as a guard but also as a locator to set the next board.

as you will notice, I'm "shaving" only 0.1 mm (0.004") at every pass and the distance between the board and the "Fence" is 0.3 mm (0.012") which means that in case that "something goes wrong", the board can move laterally only 0.012".

For the push-back phenomena, I have two safety devices, first, I'm using strong grip push-blocks and second I always stand behind the Straight edge or behind the "Fence" so in any case I'm not there to "receive" it (and it does not look to me that "push-back" can occur with "freedom" of 0.012" of the board).

Regards
niki
























































 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
That was the old set-up and it was just as a reference.
From here, I added a "Fence" that serves not only as a guard [as you can see, the bit is burried in the fence and only 0.012" are protruding through the fence (looking from above)]
but alsoas a "locator" to set the next board without the need to touch and rotate the bit again but only once, at the first set-up.


Till this pic the set-up is the same as above



And now...









































 

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Thanks for the pics Niki. Glad to see you back with us. No matter which forum you are on, I still like your ingenuity. You are one resourceful dude.
 

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Now that's what I call a photo-shoot, hopefully it will catch on and we will see them as a regular thing.
 

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Hi Niki,

I see you're up to your tricks... getting out of buying a jointer... or getting along without one because you don't have the room for it... I gotta say, you really know how to think things out, and think 'out of the box' to solve problems without having the obvious!

Very good job!!

I had to read it more than once & really study it to see how it worked...

I guess you like the iron feather boards over the wood ones? Sure look stronger, all right! :) :D

Thanks for a great show!!

... also, thank you for your 'standing permission' for me to add your stuff to me website. (That's a huge chunk!) :) :D

Later... good to see you going again!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you for your kind replies

Dr.Zook
"Ingenuity"? I would call it "Necessity", I don't have a jointer (that costs here around $1500) nor the space to accommodate it.

Harry
Photography, is my weak side, I take at list 3 pics of every "episode" and than selecting the best....

Hi BJ
1. As I said no space for jointer (nor money, I mean, for me it's waste of money).
2. My hand skills are close to zero
3. I don't know of any jointer that will give you consistent width through all the board length.

Hey, this hand jointer costs almost like M12V...guess what I would prefer...

Joe
I'll post soon something specially for you, watch for the post "Hey Joe"

Regards
niki
 

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Niki,

I just thought of something that you probably do...
If you don't do it, what do you think of my suggestion?

Between passes, moving workpiece up to the shims, clamping, removing board, and then placing the iron feathers back into a precise position, ready to make the cut / pass.

Suggestion:

Make a featherboard adjusting jig... Using a straight piece of hardwood, make a partial cut across the fence, leaving space to span from one iron featherboard to the other. The cut part is the exact depth required for the iron featherboard position. Now, to place the featherboards back into position, use this piece as a guide by just touching it with the featherboards & tighten them down... both at the same time.

It wants to be thinner than the thinnest piece you want to Joint... :)

Would it work? Would it speed up the Pass setup?

Additionally, the other end / side could be cut for bit-to-fence spacing setup... Yes?

Thank you very much!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hi Joe

I don't think that an "adjusting jig" will speed-up the positioning of the feather boards.

The feather board position is not so important, I set it by eye to something like 1/4" but a little bit more or less will not have any effect (except the effect on the pushing force required).

But of course your suggestion is good, actually, you can take a piece of 1/8" plywood, longer than the cutoff on the Fence and wide as the fence height and glue (Super glue) on each side a vertical strip of 1/4" plywood, just attach it to the fence and you get a "locator".

I could not understand the second question. There are two "players" here, one is the Fence and the meaning is the wooden fence and after I set it ones (the initial set-up as on the pic with the text "set the bit cutter at 90° to the board), I don't touch it anymore.
From now on, I just move the Straight edge (the aluminum bar) to joint the other side of the board or for different board width.

My method is to joint all the boards while the concave side is attached to the fence and then, all the boards from the other side.
If, like in the case of picture frame all the boards are at the same width (±), I have to set the Straight edge only twice, ones for one side of all the boards and second time for the other side of all the boards.

Regards
niki
 

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Niki, I hate to disagree with a fellow forum member but, photography is definitely NOT you're weak point and neither is ingenuity. Keep the photo-shoots coming.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you

You can get them from one of those "Brand name" companies that promise you "within 0.005" straight" and costs like it's made of gold or...

Try the Aluminum supply, that's where I bought my first 67" aluminum bar (on the pics) but because it's bar and Aluminum is sold not only by shape but also according to the weight it was expensive, But...

Just a few weeks ago, I "discovered" that the "Wall-to-wall carpet" guys are using a long rectangular shape, 4" wide aluminum straight edge.
They have it in various lengths, I bought the 100" (they have also 120") and it cost me here in Poland around $21.
They are very straight and I use it also as a CS and hand held router guide (you will see it in one of my next posts).

niki
 

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It depends on what I need a straightedge for. I have flat bar stock that works well. The problem with those is having enough width to remain straight.

I use a plywood straightedge, edged in 1/16" mica or 1/8" aluminum. The width varies from 4" to 8". I use a good hardwood ply in 3/4" and get both long edges straight before laminating a final edge. They work great for clamping to the subject piece, and if handled and stored correctly stay straight for years.
 

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A clamped straight edge is a clamped straight edge, if it's straight, it doesn't matter if it's wood or metal. I don't really like trapping stock between a fence and a bit. I've set up a 1/32" jointer type routing procedure primarily for straight edging formica edges. The bit (straight cutter) is encapsulated within a cove in the fence, with 1/32" protrusion from the face of the fence. After the cut a 1/32" piece of formica is added to the fence as the "take up". The bit has a 1" or more cuting face, and it will do hardwoods as well. This takes no setup, straightedge, or clamps. When I make a pass, it will take only 1/32" at a time and also do the jointing.
 

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cabinetman said:
A clamped straight edge is a clamped straight edge, if it's straight, it doesn't matter if it's wood or metal. I don't really like trapping stock between a fence and a bit. I've set up a 1/32" jointer type routing procedure primarily for straight edging formica edges. The bit (straight cutter) is encapsulated within a cove in the fence, with 1/32" protrusion from the face of the fence. After the cut a 1/32" piece of formica is added to the fence as the "take up". The bit has a 1" or more cuting face, and it will do hardwoods as well. This takes no setup, straightedge, or clamps. When I make a pass, it will take only 1/32" at a time and also do the jointing.
Yes, the traditional way of doing it. :)

To get uniform width, do you then rip on TS followed by another 1/32" router/jointer pass?
 

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Thanks for the links Joe,
Now got to figure out how to make one side of those Alu bars perfect flat to within .0001" , I'D like to go with the SS bars because there's no flexing but Alu is easier to work with and maybe get a special router bit to shave some off or something.
 
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