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Since using 1/2" to 1/4" and 1/2" to 8mm reducers and also using small diameter 1/4" router bit I have found what I think is a solution to them falling down inside the router spindle when using a router table.

I got some "O" rings that are a tight fit on a 1/2" shaft and put them near the end of the reducers so they don't fall into the router spindle. If I get some 1/2" shank straight bits with diameters 1/2" or less I will try them on them too, this will also make it easy to have them go into the collet the right distance.

I am going to get some even smaller ones and put them on the 1/4" router bits with diameters of 1/4" and smaller so they don't fall in either.

Using them on the reducers they don't fly off or move at all, so I can't see a problem with them on the router bit shanks either, anyone else do this?
 

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why...
just mark the shank at 1'' or use the mark(s) provided by the manufacturer...
and change/install the bits w/ the router on it's side..
 
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Following Mark Somerfeld's suggestion, I drop a half inch grommet into the bottom of the collet so all the bits bottom out at the same depth, about an eighth of an inch from the bottom. I just eyeball it on the 1/4 shanks using a mark if I see one, or must bottom it and then pull it up an eighth or so. I guess you could find a small enough slug of rubber for the 1/4 collets, but haven't found such a thing yet. The small O rings might work out OK, but use a couple of them. Stick's suggestion is fine, but I prefer the grommet.
 

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All I have are 1/4" routers. I drop the bit in, raise it about 1/8", tighten, and no problems.
 

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I think putting an o ring on an 8mm or 1/4” bit to keep the reducer from falling off is a great idea. It’s easy enough to see when the reducer is in the collet far enough and the o ring makes sure the bit is all the way in the reducer. For using bits the same size as the collet I just mark the shaft on the bit like Stick said. One inch will always be close to the length of the collet.
 

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I was doing that a few years ago, but found that the heat rising out the router when it was table mounted was softening them, since they were plain rubber. So they were slipping out of location too easily. A while back, I bought some silicone rings because they're supposed to have higher heat tolerance.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000FN0X04/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

So far they're working fine. My vision is failing, and it's a lot easier to locate the bit by feel than lining up a mark by sight. But I've been wondering if I should cement them in place. Maybe a tiny drop of super glue?
 

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I was doing that a few years ago, but found that the heat rising out the router when it was table mounted was softening them, since they were plain rubber. So they were slipping out of location too easily. A while back, I bought some silicone rings because they're supposed to have higher heat tolerance.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000FN0X04/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

So far they're working fine. My vision is failing, and it's a lot easier to locate the bit by feel than lining up a mark by sight. But I've been wondering if I should cement them in place. Maybe a tiny drop of super glue?
P.S. It also makes it enormously easier for me to install a bit in a CNC mounted router.
 

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Some time ago I posted the results of an investigation I carried out among many router manufacturers concerning the correct depth to insert router bits into the chuck. The result showed without any doubt that inserting a bit more than 1" into the chuck served no purpose at all. I too thought of the "O" ring idea and made this simple jig which avoids the ring from twisting as it's placed 1" from the end of the bit. This distance is not critical, just a guide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Some time ago I posted the results of an investigation I carried out among many router manufacturers concerning the correct depth to insert router bits into the chuck. The result showed without any doubt that inserting a bit more than 1" into the chuck served no purpose at all. I too thought of the "O" ring idea and made this simple jig which avoids the ring from twisting as it's placed 1" from the end of the bit. This distance is not critical, just a guide.
Great idea Harry this shows good old Australian ingenuity. :smile: Your jig will save me fiddling with them to get them straight and untwisted.

I agree with the depth of the bit as I figured it this way, the router bit shank only needs to go a little further than the length of the collet, anything more than that is out in the cold.
 

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You're spot on Phillip, every collet that I measured, and I measured a great many, were 1"so as you have said, going much further than that produces no benefit.
 

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@harrysin That little box joint bit is a twin to one I have. How do YOU set it to cut a wider piece? Or is it limited in the height you can cut? That would limit it to cigar boxes.
:big_boss:
I suppose that with careful adjustment it would be possible to raise the bit to produce joints on wider stock but I have only used it for shallow boxes.
 
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