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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a few of the items I made for customers since I retired. This is always helpful to pass time. I may as well make use of the scrapes of Corian on hand. The plaques are engraved and filled with tinted epoxy for a smooth finish. I'm always looking for a new item to make.
 

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John
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Very nice JT how do like working with Corian
 

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Very nice Jim. I'm curious how you managed to fill the engraving with the colored epoxy and do such a smooth job.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I really like the clock in the first picture. Like David said how do you do the engraving?
Thanks. Engraving via CNC router. I'm a firm believer in the old saying "The only difference between men and boys is the size and price of their toys".

I'm thinking seriously of purchasing the Vetric V Carve Pro to give me the ability to do more intricate 3D designs. Tried several versions of the BobCad BobArt software but never mastered it. Found it too difficult to master. Maybe just me!

I get assorted styles of bits from Onsrud for the different designs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
HTML:
I really like the clock in the first picture. Like David said how do you do the engraving?
Thanks, I made quite a few of that clock design (Toilet Seat). The movement is an inexpensive quartz unit I purchased online. I saw a wood version in a local store. I just copied it.

I don't have a real artistic ability. My art teacher in elementary school asked me to draw the student next to me. she wasn't impressed when I drew a stick figure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Very nice Jim. I'm curious how you managed to fill the engraving with the colored epoxy and do such a smooth job.
I did a lot of inlay work in the Corian. After engraving the material we would used the hot melt glue gun to create a border (dam) around the grooves to trap the liquid epoxy or acrylic resin. Air bubbles sometimes would give us a problem in the beginning when we first started doing it. We found using the flat tip bit helped create/trap the air so we switched to a round nose bit to eliminate the sharp inside corner. It also helped to use a small needle and run it around in the groove to break any trapped air bubbles loose letting them float to the surface. After the inlay material cured I would use a spoil board surfacing cutter to cut the surface smooth then sand and polish.
 

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Ok, as everyone else seems to either know or missed it. How do you get the marble effect????? I tried ignoring the fact you routed marble but it's just bugging me, so I gotta ask.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Ok, as everyone else seems to either know or missed it. How do you get the marble effect????? I tried ignoring the fact you routed marble but it's just bugging me, so I gotta ask.
It's not marble, it's Corian which is an acrylic plastic material made by DuPont for use in kitchen/bath counter tops as well as other uses. The marble effect is formed when the 1/2" thick (470mm) sheets are poured. The rectangular clock is made from 4 layers (470mm) of sheet stock bonded together to yield the full thickness.
 
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