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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am building a tool chest for a client and the pin and tail boards will be 18" wide. I was thinking of gluing up the boards in 10" wide and 8" wide so that the glue joints will be offset on the pin and tail boards. Is there a way to mark the boards in the dovetail procedures that will ensure that they are offset or would this happen by default in the way Leigh has you rotate the boards?

I have added simple pic for clarity. Pin boards would be the 20" dimension. The 10" and 8" shown would be the Tails. Thanks in advance.
 

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Don't have that jig, but it seems to me that if you edge glue up the 8 and 10 inch boards, you will have an 18 inch wide boad, which when cut to length, can simply be rotated as you assemble the case. So I'd glue up the boards, then cut and create the joint you're going to use on the corners.

This is the kind of case that probably should have at least box joints. Once filled with tools, this thing is going to be very heavy, and expansion and contraction is also going to affect it, particularly if the owner lives in a changeable climate, especially if the box will be stored outside.

With that in mind, I'd probably be very practical and make it from plywood.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
DesertRatTom, thanks for your input. I have to make this for a museum here in Texas (San Felipe de Austin), so it has to be out of nature wood (no plywood), but it wont be loaded full of tools, but just as a display piece. I think making sure all my joints are offset on each board will ensure strength on the sides, plus some battens on the inside.

I feel more comfortable now in the direction I need to go. Thanks again!
 

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Thanks for the further information. In that case, you don't really need to make a complex joint, just make sure the end cuts are absolutely square (90 degrees). You know that every woodworker who passes by will be looking at your corner joints, so I'd suggest you use a joint that lets them see the end grain so they know it's solid wood.

Are you thinking of using some sort of antique type of finish? Will it be a display of older tools? A new looking box might not look right with old tools.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'm going to use dovetail joins, as the provide example. The tools will be replicas, so they will look new. My client wanted this to be build as it would have looked in the 1800's (no aging). Makes my job easier :)

He is creating an area where people can interact with the items, but since they can't touch the real ones, he is having me make replicas (musket crate, rough tool chest, this tool chest, compass case, and Stephen F. Austin's field desk.
 

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Ross
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Welcome to the forum.
 

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WOW!!! That is some kind of woodworking. I love it. What wood are you using?
 

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@vwalla

With a Porter Cable dovetail jig you will identify each panel in relationship to the box itself. A quick look at the Leigh process, its pretty much the same. Leigh is known for having one of the if not the most thorough users guides on the market. Looking at the examples you posted, Shouldn't be any problems for you. If this is your first go round with the jig, do a few practice boards, just to get the feel for it.

Given the holding power of modern glues, offsetting the boards isn't really necessary, but I personally like the look. If its period correct, then by all means go with an offset.

If the intent is to duplicate a period looking piece, you might want to consider roughing up the joinery just a tad. Dovetail jigs will give you darn near perfect looking pins and tails. A little ding here, gap there will add to the authenticity.

BTW.... love the walnut compass case... very nicely done
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thank you all for the advice and the compliments. Besides the walnut case, the wood is southern yellow pine for Austin desk and the other compass case is sugar pine. Had to make a lot of templates for that walnut case :)
 

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Hi, VWalla.
Those pictures, especially the compass cases, reveal a very dedicated passion for woodworking.Thanks a lot for share that with us.
BTW, Welcome to the forum.
 
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