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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a double french door between dining room and sun room. It is a 4 inch stepdown into the sunroom. Last night I tripped on the threshold, a close fitted piece of one inch thick, six inch wide oak. I took a fall and bashed and cut my eyebrow when I slammed into the floor. Have a black eye to show for it

I now have to secure the fhreshols, which is laid on the edge of the original concrete slab.

Question: Which is the best way to secure that thing? Construction glue is a possibility, but I'm always inclined to make something like that reversible.

Any suggestions? I could drill and put in concrete anchors, then put some caps on the holes?
 

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Have to be careful of falls, especially at our age, Tom..

I would go with that simple solution.
 
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Frank
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Tom,

I have an oak threshold that I made between my basement a back room. Instead of gluing I drilled for anchors and used brass screws. I did not try to hide them and it looks fine. This makes it really easy to remove when necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
How was the threshold originally secured?
It was fitted so perfectly that it didn't move, but I guess it's worn just a bit and is now loose.

The sunroom is an add-on. It was set on a concrete extension of the patio, I reframed the interior and replaced the original plastic windows with dual pane, energy efficient windows. The old aluminum and foam sandwich walls on the outside were covered with a "skirt" so the original cheapo structure is no longer visible. My wife uses it as her painting studio and meets with friends for a weekly painting party, so I need to do something about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tom,

I have an oak threshold that I made between my basement a back room. Instead of gluing I drilled for anchors and used brass screws. I did not try to hide them and it looks fine. This makes it really easy to remove when necessary.
What kind of anchors? Brass screws sounds like a nice choice. Fit is still tight, so it only needs to have a couple of anchors.
 

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Tom, sorry to hear about your fall, but glad it was not something that disabled you. It happens fast!!

What about threaded inserts epoxied into the floor and a brass or similarly finished screw to hold the threshhold in place? Several of these could hold the threshhold solidly, yet allow easy removal if needed in the future, and it would have a nice looking appearance also. The epoxied inserts may hold up better than the plastic inserts Frank recommended, yet still allow a nice appearing screw.
 

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I have a double french door between dining room and sun room. It is a 4 inch stepdown into the sunroom. Last night I tripped on the threshold, a close fitted piece of one inch thick, six inch wide oak. I took a fall and bashed and cut my eyebrow when I slammed into the floor. Have a black eye to show for it

I now have to secure the fhreshols, which is laid on the edge of the original concrete slab.

Question: Which is the best way to secure that thing? Construction glue is a possibility, but I'm always inclined to make something like that reversible.

Any suggestions? I could drill and put in concrete anchors, then put some caps on the holes?
Stainless steel drop-in anchors with stainless slotted flat head screws (#10 or 1/4"). Never-Seez screws to prevent galling. Liquid Nails underneath to seal against drafts. Epoxy the slots afterwards for a smooth finish, and remove it with an awl if needed for repairs. Will last longer than either of us!
 
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