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My first router was a B&D 3310, can't remember the number, but I think that was the number. Looked a lot like the DeWalt 610/612. At the time I did a lot of Formica (mica) work in addition to woodworking. The router had two outboard handles, but on a lot of door edges and panels, I held it in one hand because it seemed easier than to be clamping each piece to be routed and holding the router with two hands.

As time went on and I could afford another router, of course it was a trimmer, a PC309, which I swear by as a workhorse for trimming. Now, that one is definitely a one hander, but I got used to using it for other projects, like light moulding work, only because it was so light.

To hold the 33 series in one hand helps if you have big hands. The only problem in holding routers is the isometric stress from hours of operation. There would be times I wouldn't even feel the router in my hand, and when shutting the thing off, couldn't release my fingers.

So what have we got after years and years of this abuse? A good looking, happy go lucky guy with big hands that don't work so good. I was ten years too late in getting the carpal tunnel surgery on both hands. It didn't help much, but kept it from getting worse. Add to that severe tendonitis. That's the one that hurts like heck when the fingers are bent, clicks when the fingers close, and maybe just maybe will let you straighten out the fingers from a locked tight position.

Now don't get me wrong. I'm not trying to scare anyone away from doing anything. There are signs that I didn't heed warning me. I didn't stop when the router got stuck in my hand. I didn't stop when numbness set in. I didn't pay attention to my well being.

Before doing this post, I read through some of the manuals that came with different routers and didn't see any info on possible inherent dangers in extended use. So the answer here is like with many facets woodworking to work safe and smart. I won't even get into my discovering dust, contact cement and lacquer. That's another whole post or three.
 

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Mike thanks for the information. I guess that means do what you can on the router table... :) Man you must of done a heck of a lot of routing. Yeah... dust one of the things I need to get under control and the NC Lacquer... I stay away from it... that is some nasty stuff! I started using it for finishing my turnings and it kicked my butt. That stuff will kill more brain cells than some of the drugs we worry about our kids getting hooked on!

Corey
 

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Have you ever seen the video about Sam Maloof and the way he makes his chairs?

There is a scene where he picks up his dedicated 690 and a piece needing another special routing step for his 'mortise'... Holding wood in left hand, router in right, slaps the router in place, and with both hands working in unison, makes the rotating cut... as if it were nothing... but routine... !! AWESOME skills!!
 

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I haven't been on this forum for a while, but its good to know its here.

I can relate to that feeling in the hand. I once had to cope 74 pieces of crown moulding with a 4 1/2" grinder and rough grit disk (the quick n easy way) and I ended up having such intense pain for a long time that I had to sleep with carpul tunnel wrist supports. Must have been the vibration and firm grip to hold the tool in control.
 
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