Router Forums banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I am the co-owner of a small startup in Hungary. We are building intelligent CNC routers which can be used without any prior CNC knowledge.
Our operation is currently limited to domestic customers so I am not here to sell anything. I just thought your large community could give me so honest opinions and advice.

Here is a video of what we do:
 

·
Administrator
David - Machinist in wood
Joined
·
4,360 Posts
Good video and a pretty cool concept. Will you be marketing these to the US? How well do they work for engineering purposes - flat pieces, dimensional pockets and reliefs, interlocking tabs, etc.? Or is this primarily for 3D carved projects?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good video and a pretty cool concept. Will you be marketing these to the US? How well do they work for engineering purposes - flat pieces, dimensional pockets and reliefs, interlocking tabs, etc.? Or is this primarily for 3D carved projects?
Thanks David! This year we only sell it on our domestic market but in the long term we will definitely planning to extend our sales and go overseas as well.

It is not limited to carving. Currently we have the following:

  • Contour cuts from DXF or simply cut out the contour from a piece of paper, scan it and use it as your reference contour.
  • Circular and rectangular pockets
We also have the “Manufacture from CAD model” option which basically generates the toolpath for you from your CAD model (STL) based on the tools you have in your tool rack. It is working well if the part is not extremely complex.
 

·
Official Greeter
Joined
·
20,101 Posts
Welcome to the forum...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,909 Posts
II think it depends on who you are marketing to. Being an old codger the thought of trying to learn how to use a CNC machine is enough to keep me from buying one. However, if I was in the market and saw this, I would buy i in a heartbeat. However, it looks expensive and out of reach of the average homeowner. Being expensive would mean that only a company could afford it. If the company could afford the cost, then they could probably afford a regular CNC and pay for someone that knows how to use one. If the regular one was cheaper, they would probably go with the regular model. BUT if you are looking for an old guy to show the world how easy it is to use then I'm your old goat ship it out!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
II think it depends on who you are marketing to. Being an old codger the thought of trying to learn how to use a CNC machine is enough to keep me from buying one. However, if I was in the market and saw this, I would buy i in a heartbeat. However, it looks expensive and out of reach of the average homeowner. Being expensive would mean that only a company could afford it. If the company could afford the cost, then they could probably afford a regular CNC and pay for someone that knows how to use one. If the regular one was cheaper, they would probably go with the regular model. BUT if you are looking for an old guy to show the world how easy it is to use then I'm your old goat ship it out!
Yes, I think it is mainly for companies at least for now. We already have a few customers who don’t have an in-house machinist and they don’t have enough work to employ someone full time. They used to pay for 3rd parties on the monthly bases to get their CNC jobs done. If you are outsourcing 1-2k worth of work month by month than a machine like this can pay for itself within like 2 years.
We don’t want to compete with the large well established manufacturers. Instead, we would like to make machines for small shops who were not even considering buying one before.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top