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I have two six inch Mesquite disks that I want to make into a clock. The blanks are about ready to work on but during the drying process they have gotten cracks.

The opinion I seek is how to best address the cracks. Should I drill them out and plug them, fill them with exoxy, do nothing or what do you think I should do to address the cracks.

The wood is now at about 12% moisture. My intention is to route out the back side in the shape of the clock body, drill through a 5/16" hole and mount the battery operated clock. I have some stick on roman numerals for the front side.

Currently the blanks are 2" thick and 1" thick. The two faces of each blank are parallel to each other and sanded to 60 grit in preparation to go to probably 320 grit for finishing. I plan on spraying polyurethane to help retain the bark. I will use one or maybe both to make a clock.

Let me know your opinion on what to do about the cracks.

This is a round cut from a limb. The tree was over 100 years old and was about 28" at the base. Most Mesquite trees never get this big and the person that let me cut it down after it blew over is who I am making the clock for. The rest of the tree is currently stickered and drying on my shop covered front porch. I milled the tree into about 2.5" slabs with a Wood Mizer mill. Cant wait to get to the big slabs to make turnings and jewelry boxes and so on.

Thanks in advance.
 

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Theo
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Ultimately it's your call, but I'd use as is.
 

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How long have they been cut? General rule is let them season a year per inch of thickness.
 

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use them as a feature..
I'm also going with sticks idea... use them as permanent hour/minute hands
The clock on the left is at 8:11 and the one on the right is at 10:22 :wink:
on a more serious note - be careful with that mesquite - I once got a nasty lung infection
with the sawdust. I found it also a very hard wood but beautiful when finished!
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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I'm going against the grain here, and suggest filling the cracks with epoxy or super glue. I'd be concerned that routing out the back for the clock body would lead to the cracks getting larger, and the possibility of the wood warping.
 

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No idea but you'll need to drive as I haven't been released yet.....and that's driving me a bit nuts. But pizza and a movie is great!
take out and some fishing to go w/ that...
 

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Another idea for the cracks in mesquite wood

I used to work at a lamp manufacturing company (small local business) which made mesquite lamp bases from logs and copper shades to top them. Our lamp bases were unique and beautiful, because the natural cracks were cleaned out using a Dremel tool, then filled with epoxy mixed with finely crushed turquoise. It creates a stunning look and no two lamps are the same.

Just wanted to toss that out there as food for thought. A clock done that way would be beautiful. Here's a link to their web page, so you can check out what I mean.

Google... W. Kohler Lamps... to see the inlaid mesquite bases I'm referring to. I'm unable to post the link here.
 

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@WhiteRavenNM3 Welcome to the Forum. When my dad came to the US in 1923, he set up a little botique lamp making business. They painted patterns on the inside of glass vessels that were turned into lamps. Got it set up in NYC, but the place burned down. We used to have a sample at one time, but no idea where it is now. I think I've seen something like what you suggested and it is really striking and would really make a nice looking clock.
 
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