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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my CNC Machine set up for a few weeks now, and designed a few things in V-Carve.
I'm getting pretty good at picking feed rates, router speeds, and learning my way around the different bits to use.
Now here's the issue. Normally, for the top of a table etc, I would not just use a single board,
but I might surround a board with a 2 inch boarder of wood with the grain running in the opposite direction.
That way, you can hide the end grain of the board, and it doesn't cup, etc....

Do you ever do anything like this with boards for cnc projects, or am I over thinking?

Thanks for your help.
- Ron
 

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Wood moves. The danger of surrounding a field of wood with trim running against the grain is that the field can swell or shrink across the grain when humidity changes. That will be in conflict with the trim running 90 degress to the grain direction. End grain doesn't look bad if the edge detail (chamfer or roundover or french ogee or...) transitions from the sides to the ends.
4D
 

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I've had my CNC Machine set up for a few weeks now, and designed a few things in V-Carve.
I'm getting pretty good at picking feed rates, router speeds, and learning my way around the different bits to use.
Now here's the issue. Normally, for the top of a table etc, I would not just use a single board,
but I might surround a board with a 2 inch boarder of wood with the grain running in the opposite direction.
That way, you can hide the end grain of the board, and it doesn't cup, etc....

Do you ever do anything like this with boards for cnc projects, or am I over thinking?

Thanks for your help.
- Ron
I would always complete the project manually after CNC machining using traditional woodworking methods.

CNC router ALONE is OK only if you use are using plywood, MDF, or plastic or metal sheets.
 

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G'day Ron, welcome to the forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Ron,

Welcome.

Are you talking about creating the bread boards and floating panels with the cnc or using breadboards and floating panels in conjunction with cnc carved panels?

No, I was just curious why its more common to make wood borders for table-tops than it is for wood signs.
But I think I understand. Signs are mostly just viewed from one direction, so there isn't as much focus on the end grain like if you were sitting at a table.

But even the lid of a box. I would make a box lid out of several pieces of wood so it does warp and you can't see the end grain.
I was just confused why most signs are just made from a single board, but I looked around and there are lots of examples of signs that have borders as well.

Anyway, just curious. Thanks for the reponse!

- Ron
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Wood moves. The danger of surrounding a field of wood with trim running against the grain is that the field can swell or shrink across the grain when humidity changes. That will be in conflict with the trim running 90 degress to the grain direction. End grain doesn't look bad if the edge detail (chamfer or roundover or french ogee or...) transitions from the sides to the ends.
4D
I've read that's the case as well, yet my nice dining table has a 4 inch border running around the whole thing.
Thanks for the response. That's a good point about adding additional detail to the boards.
- Ron
 
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