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I was looking at a jointer on the Grizzly web site and they have jointers that have parallelogram adjustable tables. So what does this mean in the world of jointers and is it something I need? I don't see the word parallelogram used in the specs. of other jointers.

6" Parallelogram Jointer | Grizzly Industrial
 

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Delta's DJ 15 and 20 jointers had parallelogram geometry. I can't remember if the smaller ones had it. The tables are on arms intend of dovetail keyways. As you raise the tables the parallelogram begins to approach the geometry of a square.
 

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I have my doubts that whether you had a parallelogram system or dovetail ways it would make any difference. Really, you only move one of the tables such a tiny amount, likely less than 1/8" I think.

It might just be another selling point I suppose, although I don't see any practical advantage. Or disadvantage for that matter...except perhaps just one more thing to go wrong.
 

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To understand Parallelogram, take a rectangular cardboard box and open the top and bottom flaps. Now lay the box on one of it's longer sides. Look into one of the open sides of the box as you move the present top of the box without moving the present bottom of the box.

The two present short sides of the box will change in angular relationship to the present top and bottom, but the top and bottom will remain parallel to each other. Only the space between them will change.

Put a mechanism that does this under your joiner tables with a way to adjust them and you have a joiner with parallelogram adjustment capability. I've had both types. With the
very slight adjustment range that most joiners need there isn't any user difference between them. It's just something to try to convince you that this is "newer and better" than the previous way to get you to upgrade. I'm still using my 30 year old old joiner with the dovetail type ways and have no plans to upgrade, at least not until this one can no longer be repaired. Then I'll buy whichever one I get the best deal on.

Charley
 

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PR department hard at work???
 

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Maybe cheaper to manufacture? Seems to me that there are fewer moving parts in the dovetail construction than the 4 hinge joints in the parallelogram system.

Herb
 

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If there is any premium charged for the parallelogram, I'd likely use that difference to go up in table width. I have a 6 inch Powermatic, but wish I'd popped at least for the 8 inch model.
 

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If there is any premium charged for the parallelogram, I'd likely use that difference to go up in table width. I have a 6 inch Powermatic, but wish I'd popped at least for the 8 inch model.
I would like to have an 8" also but I don't have 220 in my shop. Putting 220 in would cost a lot of money.
 

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Not alot of money

I would like to have an 8" also but I don't have 220 in my shop. Putting 220 in would cost a lot of money.
When I purchased a Radial Arm Saw years ago, I had to choose either 110v or 220v. the cost of wiring it myself was about 1/3 more for the cost of the breaker...and the real savings was 12ga wire instead of 6ga wire. It was a no brainer to dedicate 1 outlet (20amp) for the saw at 220v, it saved me a lot of money.
 

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I was looking at a jointer on the Grizzly web site and they have jointers that have parallelogram adjustable tables. So what does this mean in the world of jointers and is it something I need? I don't see the word parallelogram used in the specs. of other jointers.

6" Parallelogram Jointer | Grizzly Industrial
my early circa 1940's Boise Crane joiner has that table design...
 

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Don if you ever want to upgrade equipment you'll have to do it. Once you go to a 2 hp or better table saw you wouldn't be able to put up with the frustration of using a 15 amp 110 volt one anymore. You would also be able to have your 8" jointer and a dust collection system among other things. The most common way is to put in a 40 or 60 amp breaker in your main panel and run wire to a small sub panel in your shop and there you can distribute it as you like and need. If you are able to do it yourself it can be done for a few hundred dollars. Unless you have other people in the shop with you also running tools that will be enough for any thing up to a 200amp electric welder (40amps).
 

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. put in a 40 or 60 amp breaker in your main panel and run wire to a small sub panel in your shop (40amps).
yep, yep and triple yep !!!!
I wired up my shop and never gave this a thought. Many a time since I wish I had put in a sub panel, if just for the convenience of a single disconnect to shut down all of the powered equipment when leaving the shop and as an added measure of safety considering all the lil fingers that seem to have taken a fancy to pappy's shop. :)
 
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I'm with Charles . I didn't bother for years and really regret it now . I have a 30 amp service in my garage and got the deal of century 10 years ago on a compressor, only to take it back because my service wasn't big enough. Now I have to pay over double for one now , and I recently had my garage upgraded to a 100 amp service .
I think 100 amp should accommodate pretty much everything, although I wonder about the currency draw of a 7.5 hp compressor and a plasma cutter going at the same tme
 

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Straight math conversion Rick is about 5600 watts which is about 25.43 amps but the start up load is much higher so the compressor should be equipped with an unloader so that it doesn't labor at startup. One that size probably already does but make sure to be safe. I don't know what your plasma cutter draws. I still wouldn't think it would be so high as to be a problem but I could be wrong.

I checked some blogs about hooking up one that size. One person who did says he ran it on #6 wire and 50 amp breaker but he thought it would run on a 40 and 8 gauge but to make sure it didn't pop the breaker he went heavier. So it sounds like 50 would be the max for cut in and someone else said it would run at 32-33 amps after start up. Unless that is one mean mother of a plasma cutter then you should be okay.
 

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Matthias Wandel - Homemade jointer

I was looking at a jointer on the Grizzly web site and they have jointers that have parallelogram adjustable tables. So what does this mean in the world of jointers and is it something I need?
Matthias gives a clear explanation of the parallelogram adjustable infeed table on his homemade jointer.


Build video.


Jointer parallelogram mechanism construction

 

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