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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Never used these, only the edge of the base. I only have 1/4 and 1/2” straight bits. Should the id of
the bushing be slightly oversized so the bit never touches it? Then I would need a 3/8 and 5/8” .
I plan to make my own insert. I see them on Amazon for $20 a set, but I’d rather help a forum
member first.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Stick, I read that online. All I found was “pick a bushing that fits,” so I’d better
buy a set! My project requires a shallow routing, so with a 1” bit I need a 1” thick pattern
for the bushing to work. I will print a hi-res copy of those thumbnails.
Thanks again,
Dale
 

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They generally come in a set. I prefer brass over steel, less likely to leave marks. If you have a Bosch 1617, you'll need two adapters from their bayonet style to use the more commonly found PorterCable threaded type. Stick turned me on the very short sets that leave more of the bit exposed. Many of us use 1/4 MDF to make patterns with and the short versions, but I can't recall exactly where I found them, I think it was Woodcraft. For most pattern work, you will be using the bearing on the bit as your guide, not a bushing. The bearing will ride on the pattern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Tom, I’ll check them out. All my present and future jobs would put them to use.
Leigh has an insert, pricey, it’s the kind of thing I’d rather make myself.
 

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John
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Moderators

Ok, I am well bushed now, so how do I stop the wanted title. Have searched all over.
Got a problem PM A Moderator and will fix it if we can!
 

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I can't recall needing the bushings to be as long as they are. I cut mine shorter. If you use a straight bit and a bushing that has the same ID as the bits OD then you are going to cut into the bushing unless everything is lined up perfect and the bearings have no play. And you may need clearance for some of the chips to escape. If you are using an upcut spiral bit then you definitely need some clearance between the bit and bushing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I’ll be putting all this advice to work tomorrow, so many thanks. I think my
requests for what to do to end this post were going to the webmaster! I know
I just finally sent a pm to one of the new moderators. I hope my learning
curve is leveling out.
 

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John
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@dale
I removed the wanted part!
We normal never remove a thread,someone down he road my need to ask the same question by using the Community search engine. They could look it up and read your thread to answer their problem.
 

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When designing templates base them on using the largest template guide you have, I mainly use a 40mm. This allows one to see what the bit is doing and prevents the swarf from building up, which causes heat, and most importantly it allows most bits to pass through, not only the bit but also the COLLET for a much deeper cut.

When designing female templates the simple formula is:
template dia. - bit dia + the size of the finished opening/
 

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I can't recall needing the bushings to be as long as they are. I cut mine shorter. If you use a straight bit and a bushing that has the same ID as the bits OD then you are going to cut into the bushing unless everything is lined up perfect and the bearings have no play. And you may need clearance for some of the chips to escape. If you are using an upcut spiral bit then you definitely need some clearance between the bit and bushing.
They used to make them long to use in the Stanley Door Butt jig that had guide pins for the bushing to ride on. Maybe a carry over from that. I cut mine down too, rarely use a pattern more than 1/2" thick. Come to think of it I rerely use a bushing anymore, mostly use bearing guided bits and templates, that way the template can be actual size and I don't have to calculate the difference between the bushing and the template.
Herb
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
My straight bits are top-bearing, but 1”, making them too long for
shallow cuts, unless I make really thick patterns. Since I have so
much thin flat-stock, and no experience with these bushing gizmos,
I thought now was the time. I really enjoy making jigs and patterns,
but if I have a choice between cutting 1/4” and 1” , well my excuse
is I don’t have a bandsaw!
DJF
 

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John
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@dale
Pattern bits come in different lengths buy a shorter bit
You could also use a flush trim bit and mount the templatee on the bottom
( a flush cut bit the bearing on the bottom.)
Here a video might help

 

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Like SemiPro,John says they make short bottom bearing Bits too for cutting dados and bowls, but maybe not small enough dia. for small inlays. I think that for inlays and sign making a bushing is the best way to go.

I do a lot of edge ,inside and out with the pattern on the bottom to the stock so the top bearing rides against the template.

Not sure about the nomenclature, which is called bottom and which is top on a router bit.
Herb
 
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