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Discussion Starter #1
One thing missing from my shop is a sander like this. This smaller size suits my space and they are on sale at Rocklers ($100 off).

Does anyone own one of these and can you tell me your likes and dislikes?

Would you buy this model again?

FYI, I was thinking of using to do a ruff sand on unfinished lumber to save my planner knifes and to do some fine sanding on small craft items.

Ed
 

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Ed, I think you will find changing the sanding belt takes a while. My understanding is you wind a strip around the drum. My guess is you can hone your planer blades and save a bunch of money over the cost of sanding media. However for finish sanding you cant go wrong. I wish I had the room and the money to add one to my shop.
If you have seen the big belt sander Norm uses on the New Yankee Workshop, that machine is made by Timesavers, Inc. It uses wide belts that slide on in a breeze. Air cushions adjust belt tension. Having used and repaired these machines in the metal processing industry I am willing to swear it belongs in your dream shop! Please let us know what you decide and how it works out.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Mike,

Thanks for the input.

I don't use "ruff" wood much but once in a while someone offers some and I always turn them down because of all the junk in the ruffness of the wood, this is not like going to buy it at a store. I've seen Norm use his sander for this but of course the little one I'm look at is very different...... I could use my belt sander I guess????

Anyway the normal mode would be finish sanding of craft items, and small because I really don't have the room. One of my brothers who travels the craftshow route says that crisp edges make the sales?????? Anyway I'm looking to saving my arms for a bit longer and this would be about the easiest way to do it.

I am hoping to visit a local store to have them show me how the belt is done, how they keep the tension on the bottom belt etc. With the small motor I'm guessing the cut has to be light and again that's OK as long as it can run for awhile before getting to hot.

I always wanted a stroke sander but they are to expensive and large for me.....

Ed
 
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