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Hi there...

I have just joined the Forum and already need help!!!

I just purchased my first Router (Trend T11) and Router Table (Trend WRT) to give me something new and interesting to learn during Covid restrictions!

I am going to attach my T11 to the Table but i want to know if I first have to remove the Phenolic Base/Slider Plate on the bottom of the Router before attaching to the underside of the Table insert Plate???

I know this is probably a silly question but I can fine NO information in the Trend Book nor any videos online to point me in the right direction.

Sine all my gear is brand new i want to ensure that I do everything safely and correctly before either damaging me or the gear!!!

Many thanks in advance!
 

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Welcome to the forum! Looking on line at your router and table, you don't have to remove the plate. Looks like a nice setup! Show us some pictures when your finished.
 

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Removing the base will give you that much more depth of cut. I'm sure you know to remove the springs.
 
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Harry...what springs??? Like I said...complete novice here and only starting out!!
 

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A plunge router has springs in the columns to offset the weight of the router. In a table (upside down) it doubles the weight of the router so adjustments are more difficult. Removing those springs is what Harry was talking about.
 

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A plunge router has springs in the columns to offset the weight of the router. In a table (upside down) it doubles the weight of the router so adjustments are more difficult. Removing those springs is what Harry was talking about.
Ah OK...I was told by Trend (UK) that I did not need to do anything to attach the T11 to the WRT Table (with the exception of the Quick Release Kit Accessory!). I went back and asked them about the Phenolic Base Plate...they said leave it on!!! I asked about the Springs and they said leave them on as well. This is the problem a novice like me has when starting out...too much information that differs vastly everytime, which is why I prefer to speak to those who use this stuff every day and generally know what they are talking about!

Many thanks!
 

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Ivan, you are finding out that everybody has their own way of working, and will advise you to do the same.
In this case You dont NEED to remove the springs on the router. In fact with your above table adjustment handle i would advise leaving them in.
The reason...... On many home made tables the adjustments are many and varied. Most (that word gets used a lot on advice threads) times removing the springs reduces the weight on the router and makes adjustment easier.
With your winding handle, the spring pressure is irrelevant, and can even work to your advantage, as they act as shock absorbers and can stop unwanted upward movements if the cutter hits a knot or other obstruction.

A word of caution. Router tables spin sharp pieces of steel at up to thirty thousand revs per minute. Do not play around with a router, do not use it while even slightly tipsy. Do not use it if you are tired or in a hurry. If you make a mistake it can punish you severely and permanently.

Learn to use it safely, and its a fantastic tool. I have 5 of differing sizes, all get used often.
 

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Many, many thanks for the advice...You are certainly spot on that people will tend to adopt their own way of working and there is no "one size fits all"!

I have decided to leave the spring in as it adds a level of resistance that implies increased rigidity in the router.

No danger of me routing "under the influence"...I gave up alcohol and cigarettes in 2011 after a bout of cancer!

Regards and stay safe!
 

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The secret to staying safe with a router when youre learning is to do a dry run each time. Without the machine turned on, just take a few seconds to practice what you want to do, keeping your fingers away from both ends of the wood, looking for possible problems.
And i see your table has a nice big direction of feed arrow. Dont feel the need to go the other way, it gets very scary very quickly.
Finally, dont take to much of a bite at any one time. start off just skimming the surface until you get used to the thing.
 

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Yes...I love the wooden mixing deck you made...i have a recording studio at the house as well (another hobby!) and I love the Katana/Bokken/Tanto swords!
Beautiful work!
Safety is my "mantra"...tools scare the crap out of me and I think that is a good thing! It means that I tend not to become complacent when using them like some tradesmen I have observed recently!

Before I even looked at my new Table Saw, Mitre Saw and Router/Table, I made sure I had ALL the safety gear I would require for the garage/workshop which hasn't even arrived yet! I ordered suitable lighting, fire extinguishers, decent non-slip floor finish, extraction options, first aid kit, clothing, footwear and gloves etc...

Might be "overkill" but I'd rather be looking at them and not need them than need them and not have them!
 

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Fear and respect go together. Rehearsing as suggesting is a good idea. There are also issues of grain to consider as well as direction. This has to do with avoiding tearing out as the bit spins. If the grain is upward moving toward the blade, it is far more likely that the cutter will grab the grain and tear it out.

Don't try to make your cuts in one pass. About an eighth of an inch is about all you want to remove in one pass. Get down to near the final thickness then take a very shallow final pass to get it just right and get a smooth finish.

I have found that adjusting the bit in relationship to the fence is best done with precision thickness setup bars, usually made of brass and easy to find on Amazon. You use these mainly with straight bits where you set them between the cutter of the bit and the fence.

You also will need a straight edge (small 6 inch ruler will do) to set across the fence and the bit. Both are very handy.

Since you mention safety, I suggest you find some alternatives to using your hands to move the wood. First would be some push blocks with handles. Second, a plastic bit cover that fits on your fence. These keep your hands away from the danger of a bit spinning at 20,000 rpm. You can make or buy a fence that includes all this

Mask and eye protection. Sawdust is very very nasty to inhale. Some woods are carcinogenic (I'm a throat cancer survivor) and the really fine particles do not come out of your lungs. Many carpenters die early from COPD from years of not bothering to wear a mask. I don't even work in my shop without a mask and I have really good dust collection and filtration.

A dust port on the back of the fence can feed into a simple dust collection station like the picture, which consists of a bucket and Dust Deputy cyclone separator, all feeding into a BIG shop vac. The separator keeps the fine stuff from clogging your shop vac filter in 2 minutes flat.

Last item to start is a height adjustment jig, see pix, that makes it easier to get a bit to a desired height, very important if you are going to cut a groove or dado either on the fence or freehand.
Dust Deputy.jpg
router height gauge.jpg
 

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Eye and ear protection I wear more now than I ever have. I wear dust masks as well as having a 4" dust collection system and cyclone separator, but I'm not a fan of work gloves. They are bulky and you lose the sensation of touch which is very important. They can also catch in machinery where your bare fingers would not.

And if youre a snappy dresser, ties and loose shirt sleeves and gold medallions on long chains are a real no no.:oops::oops:
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
Thanks for the great advice.
396074


I ordered the "bits" and made this a couple of weeks ago...garage/workshop hasn't even arrived yet!!! Works great too!!!

You mentioned Push Blocks...I had been looking at options and thought that the Grr-Ripper seemed like a solid performer...any thoughts?
 

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I have the micro jig gripper. Its not cheap and many people wont buy it for that reason alone.
Its extremely useful for small and odd shaped pieces. But you can cut a push stick from a bit of scrap ply for long straight jobs.
If youre making things like mouldings that are long, then definitely buy a pair of featherboards to hold the wood down and against the cutter.
 

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I have found that adjusting the bit in relationship to the fence is best done with precision thickness setup bars, usually made of brass and easy to find on Amazon. You use these mainly with straight bits where you set them between the cutter of the bit and the fence.
You mentioned the brass setup bars...would a Trend Digital Router Height Gauge do instead or should I be considering something like:


Regards and stay safe!
 

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Again thanks...I'll stick with the Trend Digital (came with the table!) and see how I get on...I know that the Kreg gear is quite good but I'll hold off on another purchase or my good wife will kill me!!!

Just bought the UJK Parf Mk2 System and a load of dogs and accessories to create a decent MFT Table!
 
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