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i recently bought a 6' piece of trim in which i was gonna cut to the desired length and use that as my picture frame sides. first question, is this the best way to go or are there other options of making frames? do they sell picture frame router bits? if so, how the heck do you begin to make a frame out of a normal piece of stock and put a nice design in the frame??

also, when it comes to the backing of the frame, do you use the thick card board like they do in the stores or do you use a really thin piece of hardboard from hd? so, if i were to keep the trim i have for my sides how/what do i do to make the groove in the back that holds the backing (that lip or step type thing?) if you turn a picture frame over it usually has a lip that the glass and picture rest on before applying the backing material.

help,,,,,which is a nicer and more efficient way of doing this???

any detailed information would be greatly appreciated!!!


thank you
shawn
 

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Stan, excellent post on making the frames, well done!

Shawn, there is no wrong way to make a picture frame. Material choice and design are up to you. Bit selection is what looks interesting to you. A roman ogee bit is a simple choice, specialty molding bits give a nice look. The single most important factor is to be sure your corners are square. This means accurate miter cuts and careful clamping. To get started use a piece of cheap 1 x 2" pine and round over the corners on one side, cut a 3/8" x 3/8" rabbit on one corner of the back side. Cut your miters and glue this up. This simple frame will show you hands on how to check your length and width for proper fit. Once you are happy with the results move on to the next simple practice frame. Tilt your saw blade to 11 degrees and cut 1/4" off the corner of your 1 x 2" stock. Round over the top edges as before but cut your rabbit into the corner with the 11 degree angle. Now your frame will angle away from the wall on the outside edges. Miter the corners and glue it up. Next build this same frame but make your rabbit on the opposite side of the back and your inside edges will be the high part of the frame. These simple frames will teach you what you need to know for designing your masterpiece. You can follow the angle cut directions using your molding and get great results.
 

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Hi Bob

Some members use a off site web page(s) to hold the pictures / tutorial , and some times they turn the power off on that server and at that point it's all gone unless the user has a backup on his HD ,you may want to try his other web site or drop him a note to see if he had a back up spot or with luck a backup on his HD..

http://woodworking.elksign.com/
http://woodworking.elksign.com/catalog/index.php?manufacturers_id=10


http://woodworking.elksign.com/catalog/contact_us.php

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beemerbob said:
I realize this is a really old posting. But, do you have a new link to the tutorial?
 

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I did manage to find a very old backup of this and have posted it to another location. In looking at this version I don't believe it was the latest that was posted before as number of steps (such as the picture frame miter jig for the miter saw) are missing.

I will fill in the missing information during the next picture frame project.

Stans Woodworking Gallery :: Frame Steps
 

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Hi Stan,

Thanks for posting that, I will take a closer look at this when I get home tonight. I like the spline jig. That's an ingenius method for ensuring you cut splines all the same width. I assume you know the width of the push block and set the fence to this width plus that of the spline. Then once set, keep feeding stock until you've cut all the splines/inlays you need. A very safe and repeatable technique. I like it, and just thought I'd say so! :)
 

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Hi Stan,

Thanks for posting that, I will take a closer look at this when I get home tonight. I like the spline jig. That's an ingenius method for ensuring you cut splines all the same width. I assume you know the width of the push block and set the fence to this width plus that of the spline. Then once set, keep feeding stock until you've cut all the splines/inlays you need. A very safe and repeatable technique. I like it, and just thought I'd say so! :)
Frank,
Yep, that's how it is set up. I no longer have that jig, but I believe it was right at 6" wide -- easy enough to set the fence real close the first try then just dial it in with the fence micro-adjust.
There is a plan somewhere around for a more robust jig for the same purpose, will post that if I can dig it up.
Stan
 

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HI Frank

Here's just one more way it's not as nice as Stan but it works well on the router table and with the slot cutters stacked up as a pair, the spines come out right on the button.. :)

http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fixtures/2482-deep-spline-slot-jigs.html


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Frank,
Yep, that's how it is set up. I no longer have that jig, but I believe it was right at 6" wide -- easy enough to set the fence real close the first try then just dial it in with the fence micro-adjust.
There is a plan somewhere around for a more robust jig for the same purpose, will post that if I can dig it up.
Stan
 

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Hi Stan,

I did peruse your site this evening and I must say that is some fine work. This is something I would like to get more into. My *other* hobby is astrophotography (celestialwonders.com) and I have just recently started to sell prints of my work. The real money is in framed and mounted prints, but the markup for custom framing is outrageous. I do appreciate you sharing your technique, those are some smart looking frames!
 

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HI Frank

Here's just one more way it's not as nice as Stan but it works well on the router table and with the slot cutters stacked up as a pair, the spines come out right on the button.. :)

http://www.routerforums.com/jigs-fixtures/2482-deep-spline-slot-jigs.html


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Hey Bob,

Ah, another jig!!! I could spend a lifetime just trying to keep up with all the jigs you have made! Somethings I like to do on the tablesaw, some on the router table. I have the Incra jig fence system on both so precision is not a problem. I will look over this and probably use the better parts of both techniques :)
 
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