Router Forums banner
1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Sandra came to me with a drawing she made of some wall panels to hold 4 x 6 inch printer size pictures. She wanted 3 of them.
After measuring and figuring the final size they would be. I hunted around my shop and found the material I would be using.
First I had several bundles of oak flooring. I have had them for about 20 years. I thought they would be a good choice to use for the frames of the panels.
First I cut off the tongue and then using a shaper bit, that I have had a set of for 20 some years, I ran the oak through my router table.
I clamped a 2x4 in front of the guide and one over the top of the bit to keep the material from riding up.
It took a couple of runs through to cut the oak all the way down.
Then removed one side of the groove side and 45ed the corners.
I had some 1/4 inch plywood that was large enough to fit as the backing for the pictures.
I cut 3/4 inch by 1/8th for the edge pieces to hold the pictures. I also cut a tiny groove in the bottom edge of each strip to hold the pictures.
The whole thing will be painted a flat black. That should make the pictures pop out.
I made 3 of these panels.
They are painted and drying at the moment.
Here are a few pictures of the build.

David
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
well done David...
thanks for showing...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
Thanks Stick. Say, I just posted this and you have already seen and replied to it, how did you do that so fast?
I thought it would not be posted until tomorrows forum.
luck of the draw...
there's a serious T&L storm in progress....
finished the househusband stuff early...
waiting on the lasagna to finish baking...
waiting for the bread dough to rise...
waiting for the crabs to flush clean...
waiting for the rug I just shampooed to dry...
waiting on the slow cooker to finish w/ the grouse...
the SO is napping and peacefully snoring away...

so I was just sitting here having coffee, listening to the storm and eating an experiment and your post popped up......

Coffee frosted Coffee Sticky Bun....
Ingredients:
1 cup chopped walnuts
4 tablespoon coffee extract or instant coffee or espresso granules (to taste)
1 (12 ounce) package frozen dinner roll dough
1 (5 ounce) package instant vanilla pudding mix
1 cup brown sugar
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
½ cup margarine, melted

Directions:
Sprinkle nuts in the bottom of a greased Bundt pan. Lay frozen roll dough on top of the nuts. Sprinkle dry pudding mix over the dough, then the brown sugar, then the cinnamon. Pour the melted margarine over all. Lay a damp paper towel over the pan and place it in a cold oven over night.
In the morning, remove paper towel and place pan in cold oven. Heat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 25 minutes. Remove from oven and let sit for 5 minutes, then flip out onto plate.

Coffee Frosting -
Ingredients:

1 tablespoon instant coffee or espresso granules
¼ cup milk
¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
6 tablespoons butter
1½ teaspoons vanilla extract
Directions:
Mix together; instant coffee or leftover coffee, milk, cocoa powder, butter or margarine, vanilla extract, and confectioners' sugar until of spreading consistency. Makes more than enough to frost a 13x9 inch sheet cake.

Cinnamon Coffee Frosting -
Ingredients:

1 teaspoon instant coffee granules
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 pinch salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
½ cup butter, softened
3 cups confectioners' sugar
1/3 cup milk
Directions:
In a small bowl, mash instant coffee with the back of a spoon until powdery. Stir in cinnamon and salt. In a large bowl, beat the butter until smooth, then stir in spice mixture and vanilla. Alternately beat in confectioners' sugar and milk until desired consistency is achieved.

Chocolate Coffee Buttercream Icing -
Ingredients:

¾ cup butter, softened
1 (4 ounce) package cream cheese, softened
1½ (16 ounce) packages confectioners' sugar, or more as needed
¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
3 tablespoons really strongly brewed coffee, or more to taste
½ teaspoon salt
Directions:
Beat butter and cream cheese together in a bowl with an electric hand mixer until creamy; slowly beat in confectioners' sugar, cocoa powder, coffee, and salt until smooth and spreadable.

.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts

·
Registered
Mike
Joined
·
3,959 Posts
David I like those frames. I should make some for my son and his wife to keep pictures of my grandson in. I should also make some for pictures of the two great granddaughters.

Nice project and could be scaled for any open space.
 

·
Registered
Mike
Joined
·
3,959 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,045 Posts
Nice work on the frames. Here's another set or individual cutters for comparison. I have used these types of cutters when I had a shaper and can be used with a router table but of course you need to make multiple passes depending on how much cut is required. Here's a video on using the bits on a router table, this one is a horizontal table but either will work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Here is a set, not sure of the quality but should be good for a few uses. Looks like that profile is in this set. https://www.amazon.com/Architectura...rds=molding+router+bits&qid=1591324685&sr=8-2

Also check out crown molding bits for something like this.
The set I have has 6 different bits. I received it as a gift many years ago and have never used them until now. Not sure if they should be for a router table or a shaper. But it worked. It began to throw lots of debrie out when I began to run the oak through the table. I pulled it back out thinking it was tearing the board up, but it was nice a smooth and turned out very well.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
luck of the draw...
there's a serious T&L storm in progress....
finished the househusband stuff early...
waiting on the lasagna to finish baking...
waiting for the bread dough to rise...
waiting for the crabs to flush clean...
waiting for the rug I just shampooed to dry...
waiting on the slow cooker to finish w/ the grouse...
the SO is napping and peacefully snoring away...

so I was just sitting here having coffee, listening to the storm and eating an experiment and your post popped up......

Coffee frosted Coffee Sticky Bun....
Ingredients:
1 cup chopped walnuts
4 tablespoon coffee extract or instant coffee or espresso granules (to taste)
1 (12 ounce) package frozen dinner roll dough
1 (5 ounce) package instant vanilla pudding mix
1 cup brown sugar
2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
½ cup margarine, melted

Directions:
Sprinkle nuts in the bottom of a greased Bundt pan. Lay frozen roll dough on top of the nuts. Sprinkle dry pudding mix over the dough, then the brown sugar, then the cinnamon. Pour the melted margarine over all. Lay a damp paper towel over the pan and place it in a cold oven over night.
In the morning, remove paper towel and place pan in cold oven. Heat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for 25 minutes. Remove from oven and let sit for 5 minutes, then flip out onto plate.

Coffee Frosting -
Ingredients:

1 tablespoon instant coffee or espresso granules
¼ cup milk
¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
6 tablespoons butter
1½ teaspoons vanilla extract
Directions:
Mix together; instant coffee or leftover coffee, milk, cocoa powder, butter or margarine, vanilla extract, and confectioners' sugar until of spreading consistency. Makes more than enough to frost a 13x9 inch sheet cake.

Cinnamon Coffee Frosting -
Ingredients:

1 teaspoon instant coffee granules
½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 pinch salt
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
½ cup butter, softened
3 cups confectioners' sugar
1/3 cup milk
Directions:
In a small bowl, mash instant coffee with the back of a spoon until powdery. Stir in cinnamon and salt. In a large bowl, beat the butter until smooth, then stir in spice mixture and vanilla. Alternately beat in confectioners' sugar and milk until desired consistency is achieved.

Chocolate Coffee Buttercream Icing -
Ingredients:

¾ cup butter, softened
1 (4 ounce) package cream cheese, softened
1½ (16 ounce) packages confectioners' sugar, or more as needed
¼ cup unsweetened cocoa powder
3 tablespoons really strongly brewed coffee, or more to taste
½ teaspoon salt
Directions:
Beat butter and cream cheese together in a bowl with an electric hand mixer until creamy; slowly beat in confectioners' sugar, cocoa powder, coffee, and salt until smooth and spreadable.

.
You know, I could stop by and help you eat those rolls. They sure look good. Sandra is very picky about how much sugar I eat. I told her that I do not have diabetes. She said "exactly".

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
David I like those frames. I should make some for my son and his wife to keep pictures of my grandson in. I should also make some for pictures of the two great granddaughters.

Nice project and could be scaled for any open space.
They turned out very well. And yes, they could be scaled for any amount of pictures, this is what Sandra drew up, so being the intelligent husband that I am, this is what she got.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
834 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
WE need to run and get sheets of plexiglass as the cover for them, then they should be hung today. I'll post pictures of them when she gets them filled up with photos.
This morning I added wires on the backs to hang them with, so they are ready to go.

David
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,956 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
31,264 Posts
You know, I could stop by and help you eat those rolls. They sure look good.
Sandra is very picky about how much sugar I eat. I told her that I do not have diabetes. She said "exactly".

David
sounds like a plan...
I don't got it either, I don't use sugar at all...

I use honey instead...
The flavor, aroma and color of honey vary with the kind of flowers from which the bees gather the nectar used to make the honey...
Generally the lighter the honey, the milder the flavor... If want stronger flavor, use a darker, stronger flavored honey...
Ordinary granulated sugar is pretty versatile... But not an especially exciting ingredient either... A natural sweetener such as honey can be so much more flavorful... Honey also helps baked goods remain moister for longer... I also think of it as healthier too... substituting honey for sugar in a recipe takes some fiddling though...

Honey is sweeter than refined sugar, so you normally won't use it as a cup-for-cup replacement...
To use honey in baking, the first thing to keep in mind would be the approximate ratio of honey to sugar. Generally, you want to use about one fourth to one third of the amount of honey to sugar, as honey in general is much more concentrated than granulated*sugar. This would leave the conversion ratios looking like this:

1 cup granulated sugar = 1/4 – 1/3 cup raw honey
To determine just how much honey will be needed is going to take some practice and consideration on what other sweeteners*are going into the product. If other sweeteners or sugary ingredients such as fruit are being used, you will not need as much. As a general rule, start with less and add more to taste. It is easier to start with less and add more to taste as undoing a mistake*is pretty much entirely impossible in these situations.
Another thing to take into consideration is the fact that swapping out sugar for honey will increase the moisture content of the overall finished product. Generally, this will not be an issue if the amount of honey used is under 1 cup.. If however, that much honey is going to be used, you may have to scale back a bit on any liquids or high moisture ingredients being used (e.g. milk, water, yogurt, sour cream, etc.)

Start with less, not more.
Be prepared to nix 20-40% of liquids in recipes requiring over 1 cup/4.5 ounces of honey.
Honey also browns more rapidly than sugar, so it's helpful to reduce your baking temperature by 25°F...
In baked goods, add ¼ teaspoon of baking soda per cup of honey if baking soda is not already included in the recipe. This will reduce the acidity of the honey, as well as increase the volume of your product.
Moisten a measuring spoon or the cup with water, oil, or an egg before measuring the honey to prevent it from sticking to the measuring utensil. Honey is heavy by weight. A 12 ounce jar equals one standard 8 ounce cup. A quart weighs 3 pounds.
American consumers buy about 400 million pounds of honey per year, but US producers only supply 150 million pounds. So foreign businesses, especially manufacturers in China, are selling honey cut with cheap sweeteners, sugar water, rice paste or high-fructose corn syrup. Some of the honey also contains unauthorized antibiotics and pesticides.

Things you will want to keep in mind when making substitutions:
Honey adds additional moisture that is not present in regular sugar.
Honey weighs more per cup and is more dense, which can make baked goods heavier.
Honey brings its own unique flavor to a finished product.
Honey brings acidity to a recipe.
Honey causes baked goods to brown more quickly.

Moisture:
If you substitute honey for sugar in most baked goods, the finished product will usually end up soggy and sticky. However, by looking at the other ingredients in a recipe, we can evaluate which ingredients will help absorb some of the extra moisture from the honey and simply increase those ingredients to help compensate. Or, we can go the other way and look at which ingredients bring moisture to the recipe and reduce some of those liquids.

Density: 1 cup of honey weighs 12 ounces, 1 cup of granulated sugar weighs 8 ounces, and 1 cup of brown sugar weighs 6 ounces. So, if you substitute equal parts of honey for brown sugar, you are essentially adding twice as much food; but, that’s not all. Because honey is sweeter than brown sugar, you are also adding more sweetness to the final product. However, maple syrup weighs 11 ounces per cup and honey is only slightly sweeter, so you could substitute approximately 10% less honey than syrup.

Flavor: Honey adds its own flavor to a recipe. It generally has a light and pleasant flavor, but it can interfere with the desired taste in a recipe. There really isn’t anything you can do about it except choose a honey that you find acceptable.

Acidity:
Honey adds acidity to a recipe. If you are working with a recipe that is sensitive to this additional acid, you can neutralize it by adding a little baking soda. Adding 1/8 to 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda for every cup of honey is usually necessary in baked goods. It will also help to give them a little more rise.
Faster Browning: To prevent baked goods from over-browning, lower the oven temperature by about 25°F and watch carefully. When you substitute honey for sugar in baked goods, they tend to brown faster.

General Recommendations
:
These recommendations are only a suggestion. The type and properties of any other ingredients in a recipe will play a role in how different sweeteners affect the final product. In order to get the type of results you are looking for, you may need to experiment a little when you substitute honey for sugar; however, these ratios should work well and still provide delicious results!

Other Cooking:
Substitute 7/8 cup of honey for every 1 cup of granulated sugar; there is usually no need to adjust other liquids in the recipe.
Substituting Honey for Other Types of Sweeteners

Molasses:*
You can use equal parts honey for molasses; however the resulting color and flavor will be a little lighter. The reverse is also true if you choose to substitute molasses for honey.

Corn Syrup:
*
When substituting honey for corn syrup you can use the exact same amount; however, you will need to reduce other sweetening ingredients in the recipe because honey is much sweeter than corn syrup.

Dark Brown Sugar or Brown Sugar:
*
Follow the recommendations for substituting honey for regular cane sugar, except substitute some molasses for part of the honey in order to retain this unique flavor. (Brown sugar is simply regular white sugar where some of the molasses has been left in during the refining process). However, brown sugar also attracts more moisture, so it helps keep baked goods from drying out too quickly. Also, the molasses that remains in the brown sugar adds additional moisture as well as a unique taste.

Raw Sugar or soft brown sugar:*
Raw sugar is basically very much like dark brown sugar except that it has smaller crystals. It also has more of the molasses retained during the refining process. You can follow the guidelines given above for substituting honey for brown sugar. If you want to substitute raw sugar in place of brown sugar or regular cane sugar, use approximately 20% more of the raw sugar.

Treacle:*
This is the generic name the British have for molasses or any other syrup that is made during the process of refining cane sugar. Other common names used are Black Treacle, Golden Syrup, Molasses, and Blackstrap. When substituting honey for treacle use the same guidelines given above for molasses.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top