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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I’m tired of tripping over the flex pipe from the DC , so I was going to go with the 4” flex piping I have now from my General DC to a 4” vertical section of ABS secured to the wall ,
then I read you should use two 45 degree pieces to make the 90 degree turn less aggressive at the top where it turns .

My question is , it would look prettier if I went right to the 10’ ceiling height with pipe before I dropped back down at the end of the table saw ,but I’m wondering if having such a high piece of tubing would give me less performance?

I could use hangers and have the 4” ABS at 6.5 feet instead , as I could still walk underneath it , but I think that would look strange ?

The DC is going to be located to the side of the table saw , but against the wall .
I was at WP, and I found out the outside coupler on a 4” piece of ABS fits the flex hose he sold me before ,as I was concerned about size issues .
Not sure how I’m going to build the piping where it comes out of my saw , and hoping I can use a 4” ABS 90 . I’m also going to need a splitter on the table saw pipe so that I can get suction on an overhead arm I bought from SawStop for on top of the blade.

Update : My DC is 1.5hp -1250 cfm
 

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David
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First suggestion, Rick, is to pick your feet up when you walk over the flex hose. :wink: I have two 4" hoses on the floor and step over them all the time.

What HP is your DC? Does it have the power to add the extra length and vertical rise piping?

David
 

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I would think that if you have sufficient replacement air at the saw that you can maintain the velocity needed for the lift. The dust particles will rely on velocity of air to keep moving rather than suction/vacuum. Once they get to the lateral run and down run to the DC, they don't have a chance. Whatever you do, don't seal the saw too much...

I'll be doing the same thing in my garage...up 9 1/2', lateral for about 15 and then down to the DC. And I don't think I'm going for a raised floor...:surprise:...I'll be using 6" ducting...

What is the CFM for your DC...?

BTW...maybe this article might help... http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/staticcalc_faqs.php
 

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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
First suggestion, Rick, is to pick your feet up when you walk over the flex hose. :wink: I have two 4" hoses on the floor and step over them all the time.

What HP is your DC? Does it have the power to add the extra length and vertical rise piping?

David
Pick your feet up :lol:
I just find it a nuisance is all . Best case scenario would be a dust collection system build right under the tablesaw extension.
 

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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
If I was building a new garage I’d be putting 4” pipe under the floor. Don’t really feel like cutting my floor at this point
 

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Looks to be a 1.5hp - 1250 cfm . Wish I paid a few dollars more for a little more snuff

Not sure you're gonna get 1250CFM out of the 4"...at 1.5hp, maybe it's less...?
 
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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Not sure you're gonna get 1250CFM out of the 4"...at 1.5hp, maybe it's less...?
I checked the specs and it claims 1250. There’s a more expensive one that was about 300 cfm more , wish I bought it back in the day.

Reading your link I see you need a 6” duct for 1250 cfm. I suspect mines rated as if the two four inch ports were not installed , and you were just using the 6” port on the machine
 

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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
I seen something kind of interesting, a blower you put inline with the system . Never seen it done in this circumstance though
 

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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
This would be interesting.

https://www.kmstools.com/king-canada-1-hp-dust-collector-2590

It’s cheap too, but not sure how well the bag filters out the dust .
It could be located directly under the table saws extension.
Seeing as it would be connected up almost directly, maybe 600 cfm would be enough?

Update
This 13" x 24" bag is an ideal replacement for the KC-1105C. It filters saw dust and debris 35 microns and larger.
Not great imo
 

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Rick I don't want to sound ignorant but the unit you have is a portable one it seems. Why pipe out at all if you don't need to. This unit has wheels, yes? The shorter the run the better airflow you'll likely maintain but one other thing I seldom see talked about is keeping the impeller clean. My studies in HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) taught me that a dirt laden fan has a reduced airflow. I'm not saying you need to wipe it down after every use but at least a couple of times a year I would think. There are charts showing air curve performances and the flow clearly reduces with dirt on the blades. Just saying. Also as far as the bags filtering capabilities, check with the manufacturers for specs. Most have accessory bags with lower rating available as well. I know my old Shopsmith vac had like 3 choices, 7, 5, and 1 micron filter hoods. My CV1800 5HP delivers 1,701 with the 16" impeller and filters at .5 micron to 99.99%.

If you do decide to pipe it out use 2-45's to make a 90 degree turn if you can't find long radius ells and use wyes for the takeoff from the primary line, not tees. Make transitions as far from the equipment as you can and eliminate as many turns as possible. I can't say for your unit but the CV1800 required a minimum 6' pipe before entering the separator for stable air flow. And of course if piped you'll want blast gates so only the tool being used is getting all the air flow.

A few good links to check out:

http://billpentz.com/woodworking/cyclone/staticcalc.xls

Dust Collection Research - StaticCalc FAQs
 

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My shop is narrow, and found that the flexible ducting laying on the floor was dangerous as a trip hazard. So I modified a Harbor freight DC, and use ceiling drops to my tools. I used 5" ducts for the main runs reduced to 4" at the tools. I violated the DC rules by using 90's for the drops and corners (to save money). The longest duct run is 41', and drops from an 11' ceiling. I added a Dust Deputy and eliminated the filter by exhausting outside. Using a using a handheld anemometer, I have 1125 cfm at the DC, and an average of 640 cfm at each of the 3 drops. The system does a reasonable job, barely. If I were to do it over I would buy a larger DC, but not change the duct layout.
 

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Your saw will cut slivers of pieces off at times and with a wide insert they'll go down into the cavity. These tend to get hung up after a while and plug the saw up so keep in mind that you'll need to be able to clear jams from time to time. I agree with Nick's statement to step over. My saw has the same issue but the piping is on the side I don't walk over constantly so I've learned to step over. If I could just train my son to do it and stop kicking the pipe off it would be perfect. You could also make a ramp over it.

If you're going up and over consider using an HVAC elbow. They come as a radiused bend and you twist the different sections to give you the angle that you need. Once done apply that metal foil tape for metal pipe runs to all the joints. I used all metal pipe on my system to make it easy to ground. The high velocity air and particles create static electricity. The solution for all plastic piping is to run a wire down the pipe. Lee Valley has a grounding kit in their DC parts I think.
 
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Rick
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Your saw will cut slivers of pieces off at times and with a wide insert they'll go down into the cavity. These tend to get hung up after a while and plug the saw up so keep in mind that you'll need to be able to clear jams from time to time. I agree with Nick's statement to step over. My saw has the same issue but the piping is on the side I don't walk over constantly so I've learned to step over. If I could just train my son to do it and stop kicking the pipe off it would be perfect. You could also make a ramp over it.

If you're going up and over consider using an HVAC elbow. They come as a radiused bend and you twist the different sections to give you the angle that you need. Once done apply that metal foil tape for metal pipe runs to all the joints. I used all metal pipe on my system to make it easy to ground. The high velocity air and particles create static electricity. The solution for all plastic piping is to run a wire down the pipe. Lee Valley has a grounding kit in their DC parts I think.
I have thought of going with tin , but don’t see it implemented often. I’m almost debating to just keep stepping over the pipe , as I suspect these smaller systems are not really designed for overhead , as their too small .
Especially after seeing that cyclone system. WD does have theirs overhead, but I can’t remember what they use for a DC
 

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I have thought of going with tin , but don’t see it implemented often.
You will in industrial settings. I can't remember seeing anything else in a factory.
 
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