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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Methods for removing older,dried out pitch from a circular saw blade range from using Simple Green Pro HD cleaner to soaking in strong black coffee.
What methods do other members use?
Cheers.
 

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Hi

I just buy a new blade,they are only a buck or two...in the states :)

==
Methods for removing older,dried out pitch from a circular saw blade range from using Simple Green Pro HD cleaner to soaking in strong black coffee.
What methods do other members use?
Cheers.
 

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I use 409 and a brass brush.
 

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I've used oven cleaners....the kind that do not require heat....with no problems. The guy who sharpens my blades claims to have a system for determining the integrity of the carbide and he never commented on my blades. But, because 409 is cheaper, that's what I use now.
BTW, the oven cleaner did remove the "shiny" coating and the red (teflon?) on some of my blades.
 

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Methods for removing older,dried out pitch from a circular saw blade range from using Simple Green Pro HD cleaner to soaking in strong black coffee.
What methods do other members use?
Cheers.
Of the methods proffered thus far, i'm thinking this one would taste the best!!

Look out St*****ks!!
 

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Peter, what works for me is household ammonia - I use a large frisbee that accommodates the blade, and an old toothbrush, and it works really fast.
 

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I use and highly recommend Trend Tool and Bit clener. This easily removes old resins and is also the best rust removal solution I have found.
 

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Kerosene, and a rag.
 

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I have been using WoodCraft's "Gum & Pitch Remover" to my satisfaction for router bits and sawblades. Unlike Mike's method (which is non-corrosive), I would caution against the use of ammonia - as it is highly corrosive. If you solve one problem and create another you have not moved forward, IMHO.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think I will have a go using kerosene, can get at a local diy store B & Q for £6 for 4 litres. Nobody has said anything bad about using kerosene, no chance of damaging the tct from the binding on saw. Will spray cleaned blade with some WD40.
Cheers everyone.
 

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I have used Baking Soda (NOT Baking Powder) and water. Here in the USA I use Arm and Hammer brand. After letting it soak for a short time I scrub the pitch away with a old tooth brush or brass brush. I read about this in a old woodworker's book years ago - it has always worked for me. You can use any container the sawblade will fit and add enough water to just cover the sawblade. Sprinkle plenty of the Baking Soda over the saw blade, especially over areas where the pitch is thicker and letting it dissolve in the water (Baking Soda is very cheap) - do not use so much that is becomes a paste on the blade. Let the sawblade soak for a time (time varies with quantity of pitch to be removed). After 15-30 minutes test breakdown of the pitch using the brush. Scrub as required. Works for me and it is cheap.
 

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I would think the use of any type of soda is bad for the brass. This tip was before carbide tips were brazed to the steel Harry.
 

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I think I will have a go using kerosene, can get at a local diy store B & Q for £6 for 4 litres. Nobody has said anything bad about using kerosene
Hi Peter

THE traditional solvent of choice was turpentine - on the grounds that it comes from the same source as the pitch in softwoods, and most woodworkers had some somewhere for thinning oil-based finishes. Smells a lot nicer than paraffin IMHO (BTW the English name for kerosene). Personally I prefer aqueous solutions such as CMT - this stuff works and in addition I'm not leaving a bucket or tray of highly flamable liquid (which evaporates and in any case doesn't smell good) in the house

Regards

Phil
 

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I would think the use of any type of soda is bad for the brass. This tip was before carbide tips were brazed to the steel Harry.
Don't think it is really an issue as long as the blade is rinsed well after using the soda. Here is a link addressing "corrosion" of brass by soda..

Sodium Bicarbonate and Metal

I think any citrus or acidic cleaner would have much greater effect on the brass than baking soda and even then if removed quickly after use, the effect is probably no worse than the pitch itself!

Again, YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I have used Baking Soda (NOT Baking Powder) and water. Here in the USA I use Arm and Hammer brand. After letting it soak for a short time I scrub the pitch away with a old tooth brush or brass brush. I read about this in a old woodworker's book years ago - it has always worked for me. You can use any container the sawblade will fit and add enough water to just cover the sawblade. Sprinkle plenty of the Baking Soda over the saw blade, especially over areas where the pitch is thicker and letting it dissolve in the water (Baking Soda is very cheap) - do not use so much that is becomes a paste on the blade. Let the sawblade soak for a time (time varies with quantity of pitch to be removed). After 15-30 minutes test breakdown of the pitch using the brush. Scrub as required. Works for me and it is cheap.
OK thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Hi Peter

THE traditional solvent of choice was turpentine - on the grounds that it comes from the same source as the pitch in softwoods, and most woodworkers had some somewhere for thinning oil-based finishes. Smells a lot nicer than paraffin IMHO (BTW the English name for kerosene). Personally I prefer aqueous solutions such as CMT - this stuff works and in addition I'm not leaving a bucket or tray of highly flamable liquid (which evaporates and in any case doesn't smell good) in the house

Regards

Phil
Hi thanks Phil,
I've bought 2 x 4 litres of paraffin for B&Q and a flowerpot saucer to soak the blade in. Just read up on safety of flammable substances. I see paraffin has a vapor flash point 110 degrees Fahrenheit. I'll fill the saucer up outside and put it in an airtight container overnight, perhaps outside, as long as lower temps don't hinder the cleaning. I see the CMT stuff is half price from Screwfix at the moment, even so quite a bit more than paraffin. Just looked at Ebay various airtight containers available, will get one suitable size and saucer back for a refund.
Cheers.
 

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I've used Empire Blade Save for several years. I get it at Woodcraft but Amazon sells it too. It isn't cheap but I you don't have to use much.
 
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