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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I saw an ad for a Stanley plane as well as three other tools, for $15, and jumped on it right away. I went to pick it up today, and found this Stanley #4 plane in very good condition. It needs cleaning and sharpening of course, but the previous, now deceased, owner took good care of it, and I am sure I can put this back into service very quickly. Considering the condition of the plane I offered her more than she was asking, but she wouldn't take it.

So, can anyone take a stab at the age of this tool? The widow of the owner reckons he bought it in the 50s, which seems reasonable to me. Also, how good a deal was this? Was the tool worth much more than I paid for it? I was willing to pay twice as much, but I have seen 'antique' Stanley planes advertised for $45 or more.

I took it apart before I thought of photographing it, but this will give a close up on the parts and their condition. The handle was at one time broken in two and glued back together. Everything else seems to have experienced only age. I have started to refigure the blade, and will clean it up more or buy a new blade for it. I am sure it will sharpen just fine.

If these things post in order, there is my lovely assistant showing off the parts, and close ups of the parts and markings on them.
 

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Coincidentally, Roger,

I attended a workshop from " The Traditional Tools Group" in Sydney today and today's workshop was on points to look for when purchasing a second hand plane.

Yours does not seem to be suffering from too many defects, apart from the broken tote.

$15 seems a good price, I paid $A60 for a 4 1/5.

I gave the presenter 2 planes 4 1/5 and 5 to fettle and tune.

The major point seems to be to make sure the base is flat and the iron is very sharp.....

A Stanley/Bailey is not that old in plane years.

They had some today from the 1800's to early 1900's.
 

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The Blood and Gore site is generally considered to be the best historical accounting of the stanley line of planes thats out there.

I've found This site to be another good one:

Stanley Plane Typing MegaChart

After market irons are much better than OE and probably the single best thing you can do to improve performance. Thicker, heavier irons help eliminate chatter.

Regardless for 15 bucks Roger, you've made a pretty nice haul. That plane looks to have many, many years of service left in her... bringing her back to life is half the fun.. enjoy :)
 

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Great price and worthy of a tool gloat.
Recently saw one on ebay, bid at $69.00 US. But, it had a corrugated sole. I know that makes a difference. How much, I don't know.
 

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Corrugated soles are all about cutting weight. On the smaller planes, I dunno so much, but I'd imagine if you were to use the plane as a primary tool, over the course of a day, I'd think any little bit of weight shaved off would be appreciated. :) On the big boys, 6-7-8's, all the more appreciated. Not for everyone though! Personally I like the mass behind a bigger jointer
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
OK, so far I am dead certain that it was manufactured before the end of WW2, but better dating will require further research. It is possible that it was bought in the 50s, if it had been sitting in a warehouse. I suspect that is what happened to my Canadian made #5, which I bought in the 70s, after Stanley had stopped making them.

Edit: Was able, with help, to nail it down to a type 16, 1933 - 41. How cool is that? :D
 

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I have this plane that was inhereted from my great grandfather. Both handles have been replaced - rear handle has bottom piece from original but top is a file handle. Rear handle bolt threads are gone/drilled out and rear handle bolt has been replacesd with a ground down bolt installed from the bottom of the plane.

I since cleaned this up with a buffing wheel but I'm not sure what I want to do with it. the steel is a mess but can probably be ground to correct it. The biggest problem is that the there are no threads for the rear handle bolt.

The only marking is "No 4" cast into the shoe in front of the knob. the palne is 9" long and 2-3/8" wide.
 

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I have this plane that was inhereted from my great grandfather. . . . but I'm not sure what I want to do with it.
As the TV ad goes, you can buy a plane with your MasterCard, but your great grandfather's repairs are priceless. I'd give the plane a place of honor on my mantel, rather than trying to refurbish it.
 

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As the TV ad goes, you can buy a plane with your MasterCard, but your great grandfather's repairs are priceless. I'd give the plane a place of honor on my mantel, rather than trying to refurbish it.
That's funny! I'll probbably try to fix it eventually. Need to get some rosewood. Besides, my wife won't let me keep it on the mantle :(
 
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