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Hi everyone,

Again, I thought that I would share my latest project with everyone.

A few weeks ago I posted photos of my Saw Till project. The positive responses on the outcome encouraged me to start my next project. Thanks to all who responded on the till project as it energized me to get the plane till off of the drawing board.

When I cut out the sides for the saw till I had enough material to cut an additional two sides, and they were all routed using the same template. So, the additional sides were just sitting there mocking me. I had to do something with them!

The photos are pretty self explanatory, so, I won't go into a lot of details. However, I did lay out the "storage board" with rare earth magnets instead of dealing with holding clips. The angle of the board allows for adequate holding of the planes.

I look for old planes at garage sales and flea markets to refurbish and use. I have several, that are presently boxed (stored) and some awaiting refurbishment.

However, I placed my most commonly used planes out on the board for visual effect. Right to left are: #3, #4, #5 1/2, #5,(note, additional storage spot above for another #5), and #6 Stanley Baileys. The next two empty spots are for a #7 and #8 jointers. So far, I have not been able to find any locally that are reasonably priced or worth using. Next are the two wooden jointers; a 130 year old Jacob Rodgers and the last is a Keen Kutter.The two wooden Jointer planes just sit there, but the angle of the board, again, holds them just fine.

The three block planes are my most used standards; a Stanley #220, and two 60 1/2.

I have that glaring empty spot in the top right hand corner that bothers me. I may hang some of my spoke shaves and/or scrapers there to fill in the spot.

Anyway, hope you enjoy the photos.

Bill
 

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very nice job,,thx for sharing
 

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Very nice Bill. Some of those planes could be 2 to 3 times as old as we are are and yet they are still able to do a days work in the hands of someone who knows how to use and maintain them. I just bought a pair of Stanleys on ebay, a 9 1/2 and another one with no visible number that looks just like it.
 

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Very nice Bill. Some of those planes could be 2 to 3 times as old as we are are and yet they are still able to do a days work in the hands of someone who knows how to use and maintain them. I just bought a pair of Stanleys on ebay, a 9 1/2 and another one with no visible number that looks just like it.
Chuck,

I appreciate the compliment.

I love working with the hand planes. It is an art that many don't take the time to hone. I am still learning!

I enjoy the refurbishments. I love to take a rusted piece of junk and de-rust, polish, and tune, making it a usable hand tool. I have bought #5's for as little as $3.00 that cleaned up nice and are very usable. The Keen Kutter I paid $20.00 for at a flea market. It is flat and a joy to use. the Jacob Rodgers was another good find. It has some issue; the throat is a little wide and the original plane iron is at it's limit, but it too, is flat and works great. I don't use this one very often and it really should just go onto a display shelf. I just hate not using it! I don't buy to collect, I buy to use and these tools deserve to be used.

Every once in a while you can find a deal on eBay, but there are much better buys if you just are patient and keep looking. I am still looking and have passed up a few because of conditions and/or price. I will eventually find a #7 & 8, but I am in no hurry.

Bill
 

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Nice collection, Bill and nice storage.

Glad to hear that the planes are meant to be used.

I was going through the back of my shed the other day and found a couple I forgot I had.....:sad: :sad: :sad:
 

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I'm not sure if the Jacob Rogers is the one with the wedge or the one with the cap iron but Lee Valley is selling replacement blades for Stanleys. Maybe one is the right size. I've considered trying to make some. I have a friend that works in a major sawmill and I've asked him to try and get me an old band saw blade. I think the steel in that should make decent plane blades. http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=66868&cat=1,230,41182
 

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Nice job Bill.
 

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I'm not sure if the Jacob Rogers is the one with the wedge or the one with the cap iron but Lee Valley is selling replacement blades for Stanleys. Maybe one is the right size. I've considered trying to make some. I have a friend that works in a major sawmill and I've asked him to try and get me an old band saw blade. I think the steel in that should make decent plane blades. Lee Valley Tools - Important Announcement
The Rodgers is the shorter one with the wedge. It has the original iron in it, and it doesn't have too many sharpenings left. I've dated it to somewhere in the neighborhood of 1870-1880, so it is no youngster. The sole has been flattened a couple of times and that has opened up the throat. However it works fine. I usually reach for the KK as it adjusts much easier. However, the Rodgers does adjust easily with a judicious hammer tap.

Bill
 

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Hey Bill...

Great job on both tills. Thats sure to be one popular area of your shop. Not only for the tools, but for the way they are displayed. IMHO well done tills, chests, etc. do just that. Nicely done.

I'm with ya on planes. From set-up to use there is really nothing quite like them in the shop. Finding and bringing them back to life is another skill set altogether.

bill
 

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The Rodgers is the shorter one with the wedge. It has the original iron in it, and it doesn't have too many sharpenings left. I've dated it to somewhere in the neighborhood of 1870-1880, so it is no youngster. The sole has been flattened a couple of times and that has opened up the throat. However it works fine. I usually reach for the KK as it adjusts much easier. However, the Rodgers does adjust easily with a judicious hammer tap.

Bill
I was checking Lee Valley last night to see what's new, since they have a free shipping event and I found blades made for wooden planes with wedges. They are a little pricey but they would work much better since they are tapered. Lee Valley Tools - Important Announcement

You could close the throat back up by gluing a shim or some veneers to inside face.
 

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I was checking Lee Valley last night to see what's new, since they have a free shipping event and I found blades made for wooden planes with wedges. They are a little pricey but they would work much better since they are tapered. Lee Valley Tools - Important Announcement

You could close the throat back up by gluing a shim or some veneers to inside face.
Chuck,

Great link! I really hadn't gone looking for a blade, but, now I know that I can get one from Lee Valley. It uses a 2-3/8". I just have to decide on A2 or O1, they are both the same price. I will probably wait until I need to order more to save on the shipping, though.

When the throat really gets to bothering me, I will get a piece if Beech and close it up a little. The only place to get something like that in this area is the Woodcraft store and I don't remember seeing any there. I'm sure that they have it or can get it. I just hate paying their prices for wood.

I no longer live in the land of hardwoods...just trashy pine trees! Time was I could go out the back door and lay my hands on anything; oak, maple, ash, poplar, basswood, et. al. One day I will get out of the "Sunshine State" and get a little further back up North.

Bill
 

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Bill I like your attitude, there is nothing neater that shavings made with a sharp hand plan. N
Amen! Most don't take the time to learn how to use hand tools. Most rely too heavily on power tools and then get frustrated when something doesn't quite fit or doesn't fit tight enough. Hand tools can save a lot of frustration. You just have to take the time to learn how to use them and keep them sharp.

I can usually fix a fit problem with a plane, (hand or block) or a chisel, and be back to work faster then most can by the time they get out and set up a power tool.

Bill
 

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I can usually fix a fit problem with a plane, (hand or block) or a chisel, and be back to work faster then most can by the time they get out and set up a power tool.

Bill
Or a cabinet scraper. I wouldn't be without mine.
 

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Hand tools can save a lot of frustration. You just have to take the time to learn how to use them and keep them sharp.

Bill
Sharp is the key word. Thanks for the thread and your posts.
 

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this deserves to be brought back to the top of the heap....
 
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