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Discussion Starter #3
I have some Japanese hand planes...but nothing like that incredible one in the video. Look at the size of the iron in that thing! Fantastic!
 

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I still wanna know where they are getting their wood from...
even more so now...
 

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I've seen smaller, (normal) planes pull lacy ribbons from hard and soft wood boards but I wonder how important grain direction is. I can produce ribbons with my Stanley planes but not flimsy lacy ones like that monster does, mine are flexible but sorta stiff.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've seen smaller, (normal) planes pull lacy ribbons from hard and soft wood boards but I wonder how important grain direction is. I can produce ribbons with my Stanley planes but not flimsy lacy ones like that monster does, mine are flexible but sorta stiff.
As soon as you get cross grain, you're done. The wood falls apart immediately.

You need to set your plane to take a thinner cut and have the blade beyond razor sharp.
 

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I've seen smaller, (normal) planes pull lacy ribbons from hard and soft wood boards but

1... I wonder how important grain direction is.
2... I can produce ribbons with my Stanley planes but not flimsy lacy ones like that monster does, mine are flexible but sorta stiff.
1... A lot.. be w/ the grain. against the grain or across the grain...
2... you are taking too big of a bite... the iron is set too deep...
let it protrude from the bottom of the sole about the thickness of a playing card to start and work from there...

ooops...
forgot the PF's...

.
 

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I always start at -0- then turn the knob till I get a bite. I also use DMT Duosharp diamond stones along with the MKII guide and get wicked sharp edges with the micro bevel. Does it matter whether its a low or high angle plane? What about the MC of the wood?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I always start at -0- then turn the knob till I get a bite. I also use DMT Duosharp diamond stones along with the MKII guide and get wicked sharp edges with the micro bevel. Does it matter whether its a low or high angle plane? What about the MC of the wood?
What grit equivalent is your finest diamond stone?

A high angle plane is better for very thin strips, which seems counterintuitive.

The wood needs to be dry. Ever tried running damp lumber through a thickness planer? Ribbons of wood get peeled off the wood, not planed.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I still wanna know where they are getting their wood from...
even more so now...
Stick...Hinoki wood, or Port Orford Cedar.

See if you can run down one Len Brackett. He builds Japanese Style homes. Possibly in the Oregon/northern California area. I have the book he wrote somewhere in which he describes in detail how the wood is cared for.

And I seem to recall an extensive article in Fine Homebuilding about Len as well.
 

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cocbolo1,

I have the Duosharp red/green stone diamond, 600/1200, I have a Stanley #4 and 3 small low angle, one is used for the shooting board only.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
cocbolo1,

I have the Duosharp red/green stone diamond, 600/1200, I have a Stanley #4 and 3 small low angle, one is used for the shooting board only.
Hmmm, I think I have three of those Duosharp "stones", not really stones at all.

I wasn't aware - until I just checked - as to how they rate the grit equivalent. I see that they use mesh numbers, as well as listing micron sizes.

I'm pretty sure that the ones you have will be great for general sharpening, but you would need the higher two numbers to get a better edge. And even then, I don't know how much polish they would put on your blade.

Try looking at the edge with a microscope, say around 60 to 100 power. That ragged looking edge will really surprise you.

I use the diamond setup for general sharpening and waterstones when I want it really sharp. Plus patience, lots of patience.
 

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I've been pretty happy with the irons, I get smooth finishes after a fresh sharpening session. The 1200 does produce a polished edge on the flat but I only hone a couple stokes on the full bevel then work the micro bevel. I was considering a 12000 grit ceramic stone, for finish polish.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I've been pretty happy with the irons, I get smooth finishes after a fresh sharpening session. The 1200 does produce a polished edge on the flat but I only hone a couple stokes on the full bevel then work the micro bevel. I was considering a 12000 grit ceramic stone, for finish polish.
I'm quite sure you will be happy with that. But it does take time to get the blade sharp at 12000 grit. That's where the patience comes in.
 

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I'm quite sure you will be happy with that. But it does take time to get the blade sharp at 12000 grit. That's where the patience comes in.
I go with the scary sharp method, using PSA's, down to .3 micron's. thats a safe +/- 12000. I use it for the final polish on the micro bevels. Even at that,,its little more than an experienced "Guess" when enough is enough...but damn,,,it does properly define SHARP...
 
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