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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi

Sorry for this maybe stupid question and poor english.
I have a regular plunge router that is supposed to be used as a "handrouter". However I wish to mount it under a table to use it as a fixed (staionary) router setup.

When I plunge the router all the way down as much as possible the router bit does not stick out far enough to be "above" the tabletop.
Kind of strange to explain .

So I basically plunge it all the way down, as much as possible. Then i fix it in that position , when I then hold the router upside down and put it through the hole in my table the routerbit is not sticking high enough, it sits almost level with the tabletop surface.

My tabletop thickness is two MDF plates from .70 inch thick ...

Any ideas suggestions ? thanks a lot y'all

Bram (Belgium)
 

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Two thicknesses of .70 thick MDF will indeed eat up alot of bit length.
The trick if you haven't done it already would be to get a good (commercially available) insert plate to mount your router to, and then make your table accept the insert. They are typically made from phenolic material. Very strong, and typically only around .3125" thick or so. There are a few good ones available, or you can buy yuor own phenolic material, and make your own.
Good luck,
Jeff
 

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Hi Bram
Is your router a Port.Cable , by chance. ?
I have seen some that will do this if the router table is 1.5 thick and you are using a short bit.
The P.C. plunge router will only go down just so far b/4 it stops at the collar lock nuts.
You will need to get a new base for the router if you want to use it in your router table.
Don't take the springs out of the P.C. plunge router, the new base is cheap so to speak. (you can get it off the Net from P.C., replacement parts)
Then you will have the best of both worlds a table router and a plunge router.

Bj :)
 

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Bram, It sounds to me like you have a couple problems. Let me walk you through this a step at a time. First off, most routers are table mounted with a mounting plate which replaces your sub base plate on the router.(The sub base plate is usually black in color and attached with 3 or 4 screwsthrough the bottom) This plate gets recessed into the table top. Most mounting plates are about the same thickness as the routers sub base plate so you should get the same amount of bit above the table as you do when you plunge your router. I have seen routers mounted by making a recess in the top that the router slips into; the router is then held in place with toggle clamps(3). Mounting plates come in different styles and sizes. Visit http://oak-park.com/ to see the Router Workshop "Vacuplate" with built in dust collection. Other plates may be viewed at www.rockler.com and www.woodcraft.com
I have two Rousseau mounting plates set up with a Bosch 1617 and a PC 7518. This makes it a snap to switch between normal and heavy duty routing; just lift one out and drop the other in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi everybody

Your suggestions bout using a base late makes a lot of sense to me. Stupid that I didn't figure this out myself.

I get the picture how it should be done and will have a look at what I can come up with. Then it's only about finding a good system to adjust bitheight from above the table.

Thanks alot people !

PS : the shops you guys are telling me about (rockler and others) are based in the states , so I guess shipping cost will be excessive to europe (belgium). Will have to look closer to home. Although I have to say that we in Belgium only have two kinds of shops : the very very simple hardware store where you can buy very novice stuff for excessive prices , and then you have the professional shops where you cannot go as a hobby-user ... but anyways , I'll get around to it and let you guys know how it moves along

Sorry again for the "wicked english" , hahahaha
 

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Hi Bram - I'd be surprised if there's not someone on your side of the ocean that sells router plates that are similar, but cost certainly can be an issue I sympathise with - another option would be to make your own router plate - I believe several of the folks here have done that - although I have'nt myself, it doesn't apear to be too difficult a task - following is a link to a recent post of bobj3's shop photos where you'll see an example -
http://www.routerforums.com/showthread.php?t=2532
Just another possible option for you. I'm sure some of the folks here who have done this could provide more direction.
P.S. - Your English is very good, and you guys really have the best beer!!
 
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