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John
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If the banding you buy say that it can be stained I would think you could paint it.
 

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to paint the mylar...
buff/scratch up the surface w/ a scotch pad...
wash w/ lacquer thinner..
prime w/ emulsion primer...
go for it...
 

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I generally prefer to do edges with hardwood, either T&G or just cut flat and pinned and glued in place. No problem painting that way. That's how I did the shelves in the TV/bookcase/cabinet entertainment center in my living room.

I have done iron on but can't remember finishing it, it was awhile ago. I remember buying a cheapie iron to use for that purpose.
 

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If you are going to use iron on then I would "size" the wood with some wood glue diluted about 50/50 with water. Without it the end grain is so porous that the tape is likely to let go later. I'm like Tom. I prefer solid banding, normally at least 1/4" thick that gets glued on.
 

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to paint the mylar...
buff/scratch up the surface w/ a scotch pad...
wash w/ lacquer thinner..
prime w/ emulsion primer...
go for it...
That probably work on the Mylar coating on the particle board because the Mylar is probably originally applied with heat or baked on, but with the edge banding I would venture to guess the lacquer thinner might desolve the hot glue on the banding and come loose.
Just saying,
Herb
 

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That probably work on the Mylar coating on the particle board because the Mylar is probably originally applied with heat or baked on, but with the edge banding I would venture to guess the lacquer thinner might desolve the hot glue on the banding and come loose.
Just saying,
Herb
don't soak the banding ... wipe it down..
can we say '' everything in moderation'' here...
 
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I also do mostly solid banding, usually 1/4" thick, just glued on and then trimmed flush to the panel surfaces. On outside corners of 3/4" thick Birch cabinets, If I don't do lock miter joints, I use pieces of solid wood a little over 3/4" square, add biscuits for alignment of both panels to the strip, and flush trim the outsides. Since I've been doing a lot of Birch and Baltic Birch work I've found that Soft Maple has a nearly identical color and grain structure, so it goes well with the Birch plywood. Even a very light stain or no stain looks good on it.

Getting into another, but related subject, I never glue in my biscuits any more. I only glue the edges of the wood and install the biscuits dry to help with alignment. Many years ago when using biscuits was the rage, I glued a pine table top together using glued in place biscuits, and sanded the top flat the following day. A month later when I looked at the top of the finished table with the light shining just right across it I could see biscuit shaped dents in the surface every place that I had installed the biscuits. When the moisture of the glue had left the biscuits, it had pulled dents in the top surface of the table. I ended up making a new top for that table and did not glue in the biscuits. About 20 years later and the top is still perfectly flat. I've used biscuits dry for alignment only ever since.

Charley
 

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I also do mostly solid banding,

Getting into another, but related subject, I never glue in my biscuits any more. I only glue the edges of the wood and install the biscuits dry to help with alignment. Many years ago when using biscuits was the rage, I glued a pine table top together using glued in place biscuits, and sanded the top flat the following day. A month later when I looked at the top of the finished table with the light shining just right across it I could see biscuit shaped dents in the surface every place that I had installed the biscuits. When the moisture of the glue had left the biscuits, it had pulled dents in the top surface of the table. I ended up making a new top for that table and did not glue in the biscuits. About 20 years later and the top is still perfectly flat. I've used biscuits dry for alignment only ever since.

Charley
I agree with Charley, I read an article one time where biscuits add nothing to the strength of the joint,(through tests ),they only add to the alignment of the joint. I had on a few occasions had the biscuit swell prematurely andI couldn't get the joint tight. so I started not gluing the biscuits and had better results. Also experienced the same indent as Charley mentioned.

Herb
 

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I generally go with 1/2 - 3/4 inch banding to add a little more stiffness to a shelf. I occasionally use a piece 1.5 inches wide to act as a truss, if I'm going to put heavy art books or heavy items on a shelf.
That is an age old method of adding strength to the front edge of longer shelves, such as in linen closets. By adding say a 1 1/2: wide piece of say base trim to the edge of the 3/4" thick shelf it adds a lot of strength to keep the shelf from sagging. And if you need to add a lot use a 2X2 rebated out 3/4" for the shelving to really beef up the front edge.
Herb
 
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