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Retired Engineer, Hobby woodworker
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Saw some You Tube videos on this and r4alized it's the answer to the design flaws of my crappy Craftsman router. Biggest problems were the height adjustment mechanism is useless and the dust collection adapter was on the wrong side, requiring removing 2 tiny screws to remove it in order to change bits. After battling with these issues for a few years I am thrilled to have found the solution. I removed the rack and alignment pin so that I could rotate the router body 180, solving the dust collector adapter problem and allowing the jack to easily raise the router to the needed height. It's also now easy to slide the router body in and out of the base for frequent cleaning.
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Retired Engineer, Hobby woodworker
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33 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A couple of years back I thought about using my old "Thunderbird" jack for a router lift.... thought it might work but never tried it..... glad to see yours and happy for you.
U
A couple of years back I thought about using my old "Thunderbird" jack for a router lift.... thought it might work but never tried it..... glad to see yours and happy for you.
Did the pre-Chinese routers have that poor design too?
I wonder how a small bottle jack would do?
A bottle jack would be worse. You have no control over how far it would raise the bit. It's all about control. If you are making something like rail and stile joints they have to be so precise that you can't have one side even a hair higher or lower.
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I agree about the bottle jack.
If you had nothing else to do you could probably make one using threaded rod.

I considered that, especially using 3/8-16 rod so that each revolution is 1/16 motion. Ruled it out because it would take too long to raise very much and I would have to build the scissor mechanism.

Plan on test cutting today, will report how that goes

Thanks for y'alls input. I had ordered this scissor jack on Amazon. The 1st one they sent got lost so they sent another, which also got lost so they sent a refund. That's when I decided to use the car jack. Well, the jack came yesterday & they company said to just keep it. The concerns you all had were spot on concerning the vent holes and the difficulty in accurately adjusting using the acme threads. So, with thanks for all your recommendations, here is the revised design. Although there is space for air intake, the intent is lower the jack and pull it out out once router housing is locked, but it's not the end of the world if I forget occasionally.

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Hi Rev A,
you can chuck the opposite end of the threaded rod in a cordless drill, and use that for rapid gross movements up or down, then use the large star knob for fine adjustments. You might have to turn the jack side on, so you can access both ends of the threaded rod from the same side of the table.
Interesting that, unlike most car jacks, your threaded rod has opposite turns of thread from the central unthreaded part, like the screws on wooden hand-screws.
Thanks for the tip. Interesting observation about the direction of the threads. It is left handed. I had to drill and tap the connection side of the knob for a small screw to stop it from unscrewing when lowering.
No need for using a hand drill for rapid motion. The thread is coarse enough that a few half turns gets as much motion as I’ll need. The Craftsman only has 1 1/2 inch of available travel.
All the hassles with that Craftsman remind me to keep Stashing away money to buy a DeWalt.
 
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