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Well, after many years of scheming, planning, wishing and hoping......I am finally getting me a shop!

I had a 12 X 16 shed built in my backyard this week. Today I bought the AC and some lights. The lights are bright enough, but there are too many shadows. So I will be buying at least 1 more set; maybe 2.

My electrician is coming by tomorrow to figure out what all he needs to do to get me power. But he will be working out of town next week so it will be the last week of July before I have electricity.

Then I will get the walls and ceiling insulated and covered in plywood. I hope this will dampen the sounds and help the AC beat the heat!!

Here are a few picks from the build. As I get it set up and operational I will post more pics.

PM me if you want the brand name and specifics of the shed. I am extremely pleased with the company, installers and the quality.

Thanks!
 

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Theo
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Wow, that's huge, mine is 8X12. Either that or none, so I opted for a sure thing. Mine was put up by one guy, all pre-cut, in half a day.

Here's a tip. Paint it white inside, the glossiest paint you can find, and at least two coats; I'd suggest a roller. It'll look like an ice cube at first, but it will dim down when you start filling it up, and sawdust gets on the walls. When I say paint, I mean walls, ceiling, floor, doors, everything. It will make a large difference in lightening the inside over just plain plywood.
 

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Don't know how many circuits you're having installed. My 2 sheds share a 60 amp sub panel, divided into 3 20 amp circuits. Each circuit and outlet is color coded so I can split the load. I have all LED lighting so I can use the same circuit for light, heat or AC. I keep two circuits open, one for whatever tool I'm using, the other for the dust collector. Do wire and insulate, then install drywall, then paint. MUCH easier to keep clean. Out here there was no electrical permit required. The second shed is 10x12 and is a small office where I do most of my printing.

Insulate the ceiling. If it has 2x6 beams, put up R38. Find a way to seal the doors. Probably too late now, but I would have put in insulation under the floor if I had to do it again. I also lined the ceiling with that reflective, aluminized bubble wrap, which reflects heat out in summer, in in winter. It's only R4 but it makes a difference. Do the insulation and drywall BEFORE you put a single tool in there!!!!!

My shed is 12x24 and it looked huge at first, but I eventually outgrew it. Since yours was built in place, it's probably level, mine is not. So you could add a same size deck in front, then over time enclose and cover it. You're going to be taking tools outside to use, so putting a deck out there the same height as the existing floorwill make it easier to roll rather than carry your tools outside. Last item: The 1 inch ply floor in my shed is not all that solid, consider putting a piece of 3/4 ply underneath your table saw to prevent wobbling.

Really nice building and I understand what you mean about better to get a somewhat smaller shed rather than have none. I predict considerable enjoyment ahead. My wife likes me spending time in the shed, close by, but not under foot. Keep your cell phone handy for emergencies.
 

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Oliver (Prof. Henry)
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Congratulations, Frank. I know you are going to enjoy having a year-round work space where rain or shine, heat or cold doesn't matter.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Tom,
my electrician came by today to get an idea of what I want. He has made a few suggestions which I will go along with. The walls and ceiling will WILL BE INSULATED after the electricity is installed.

I did get the AC installed into a wall this morning. I went with a 10,000 btu unit and even without insulation, it is keeping it comfortable inside.

The saws and other tools I used to install the AC will be put away this afternoon.......no tools will be brought in the shed until the power is run, the insulation is in, the paneling is up.


Oliver,
I am SO looking forward to being able to carve when the weather would have stopped me......I'm ready to enjoy my shed and the opportunities I have ahead of me.

Thanks!
 

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Ross
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Nice one Frank.
 

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who says scheming, planning, wishing and hoping doesn't pay off :)

I"m thinking two things you'll be in need of are:

A really good cooler and a really comfortable shop stool..
 

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who says scheming, planning, wishing and hoping doesn't pay off :)

I"m thinking two things you'll be in need of are:

A really good cooler and a really comfortable shop stool..
Got 'em both Bill......I am going to have a fridge for drinks and a place for 2 people to sit.

"Adult beverages" are consumed inside the house......not in the shop.....and NEVER on the road. :)
 

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That's a great starter shop, but I think you may have undersized the AC for having that size shop in Texas. Insulate it extremely well, Weatherstrip the doors too, and you may be marginally fine. Also, try to find a good quality pleated furnace filter that will completely cover the coil and fit under the plastic face of the AC. I have a 23,000 btu heat pump window style unit mounted high through the North wall of my 14 X 26 insulated shop, and it begins to loose ground when the temps outside go above 92 degrees. This past week the afternoon outside temperatures reached 96 almost every day and the inside temps climbed from the 72 setting to 78 degrees with the unit running 24/7.

A 12 X 20 pleated furnace filter just fits inside the cover of my unit and completely covers the coil. It lets the unit double as a whole shop air filter. I use this filter instead of the original foam filter because the original filter didn't stop the sawdust very well. If sawdust gets in the coil, the unit's efficiency drops rapidly, and it's a bear to clean out. Use a good quality furnace type pleated air filter and clean or replace it often, even if you have to tape the filter on the outside of the plastic cover. You want to filter the air going into the unit. There is no need to filter the air exiting. Aim the exit fins up slightly as cold air settles.

A 60 amp 240 volt electric service is adequate for a shop that size. It will let you run the AC, a large air compressor, even electric heat, table saw, and even electric heat and all the lights and bench 129 volt outlets that you could possibly need. You can actually have more total amps of all of the circuit breakers for a total of more than 60 amps, because all of the circuits will not be drawing their full rated current at any given time.

I put a four outlet quad box every 4 feet along the bench walls of my shop and wished that I had added more. There are 2 - 20 amp outlet circuits and the boxes alternate between the circuits, so I could fully load two adjacent boxes and not have an overload.
My ceiling lights and outside lights are connected to these two circuits as well, but about half of them are on each circuit. This keeps me from being totally in the dark if I should trip one of the breakers. I also have a couple of outlets on the ceiling. My table saw as well as my dust collector, the heat pump, and my Unisaw are all 240 volts and each are on their own 2 pole breakers. When working as just one man in my shop I have never tripped a breaker, and frequently have the AC, dust collector, compressor, and Unisaw all running at the same time. The starting current may be as high or higher than the circuit breaker rating, but the actual running current will be much less, so the total amps will be much less than the panel rating.

I think you are going to out grow that shop in a few years if you stay with woodworking. If you believe me, then you should get a larger electric panel for it now. It will not cost much more now to go with a 100 amp panel now, but the wire and panel will need replacing, if you go with 60 now and then decide that it isn't big enough and want 100 amp panel in a couple of years. My panel is 100 amps, so I can add onto my shop if I decide to, but it will be a tight fit to comply with the zoning laws.. I'm a licensed electrical contractor and installed it myself. I built and then wired my own shop by myself.

My shop has a small refrigerator and running water with a sink for hand washing and glue cleanups, It also has an outside faucet to wash the cars and trucks, but it has no toilet and I regret this very much. If I ever build another shop, it's going to have a toilet, even if it's just a urinal hidden somehow in the corner. The shop will be at least a 3 car garage in size too. (I'm dreaming).

Good luck and have fun in your new shop. I would plywood the inside walls, sheet rock the ceiling, and paint them white, but do whatever seems right to you and your budget and then enjoy making things.

Charley
 

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Theo
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who says scheming, planning, wishing and hoping doesn't pay off :)

I"m thinking two things you'll be in need of are:

A really good cooler and a really comfortable shop stool..
My vote goes for a comfortable office chair, and a toilet. My shop WILL have a composting toilet when I get back in it.
 
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Update 2017 07 24

The boxes and wires are in.....just need 'em connected!! Hopefully tomorrow the job will be complete.

So, 7 of the 8 receptacles will be 4-gang.
Only the A/C will not. The A/C will be on its own circuit.
The lights will be on their own.
And each wall of outlets will be their own circuits.
There will be 2 outlets on each end of the building outside.....both will be GFI outlets.

Slowly but surely it's coming together.
 

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Loooooooooooooooooooooooooking good Frank! gotta be exciting times :)

Might I suggest a befitting first order of business....A new sign for your new shop. One that strikes just the right chord
 
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Loooooooooooooooooooooooooking good Frank! gotta be exciting times :)

Might I suggest a befitting first order of business....A new sign for your new shop. One that strikes just the right chord
Thanks Bill......I'm like a kid in the candy store!

I've been thinking of some sign designs but have not come up with one yet. I know if will at least contain the words "POPS SHOP"! LOL
 

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I was just relooking at your shed and thinking...ohhhh, where the metal bottom floor frame is, I think I would have poured concrete in there so I don't end up in Kansas! lol
 

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I was just relooking at your shed and thinking...ohhhh, where the metal bottom floor frame is, I think I would have poured concrete in there so I don't end up in Kansas! lol
It is on 2" thick concrete pads and anchored in the ground 4 feet deep in 4 places. Living on the Gulf Coast we have to build to stringent standards and pass inspections. I passed! LOL
 
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I've been thinking of some sign designs but have not come up with one yet. I know if will at least contain the words "POPS SHOP"! LOL[/QUOTE]





Here ya go Frank!!! Any Size you want it.
 

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