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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This is by Stick486

One very important thing you have to remember is to make sure your router box is vented w/ outside air for the motor or you will cook the motor from excessive heat because of the lack of cooling air for the motor...
Do this by either sticking the motor's air intake outside of the box or add a ''snorkel'' to the end of router motor...

This is by Herb Stoops...

That is a good point, Stick, I let the router protrude through the bottom of the box. By doing so I had to cut out the bottom to clear the posts for the JessEm lift. I like Stick's idea better to clamp a flex hose around the router and let it protrude through the bottom of the box to allow the motor to suck clean air. I also have an adjustable port in the side of the box to allow more air into the box to create a maximum air flow through the box.

In my first router table I had the Milwaukee router, it was a real workhorse, the reason I bought the Milwaukee was at that time it was one of the few routers you could adjust the height from the top of the table. I didn't have a dust collection under the table at that time and could reach under, unlatch the router and do the adjustment from the top ,then reach under and lock the router. But the amount of chips and dust that ended up under the table was a large amount. The fence dust collection just couldn't get half the chips.

I also doored the router box for easy access to the router and the lift...
Stick did the same and he installed his vents in the door...

Under the table DC is a must, I branched off a 4" diameter hose with a 2½" take off to the fence and the 4" line to the underside of the table's box.

Herb

This is by Stick486

Now for Plan ''C''.....


A closed dust collector box keeps the inside of the table's router box at negative pressure. Which limits air flow and to some extent, deprives the motor of cooling air flowing through the motor. This fosters a condition where the router motor will overheat.

Building a box enclosing the lift and router motor w/ DC porting/venting and at the same time providing motor cooling make up air separately allows the DC's air to flow at optimum efficiency.

Suggestion:

Add a large square boot, (right angle 4'' outlet minimum), centered to the router motor, on the bottom of the box and dedicate to DC....

Now, cooling airflow to the motor.
Adding a ''snorkel'' made of plastic or metal to the end of the router motor, of sufficient length to protrude outside of the box, irrespective of motor elevation, would ensure fresh cooling air to the motor.
This snorkel/tube/sleeve goes right through the dust collector boot (you would need to cut a hole in the boot for integration). It allows the motor to draw clean outside air for cooling while not interfering w/ DC.
HEAT will destroy your motor in very short order without good clean airflow.

When you attach the snorkel to motor make sure you don't seal up the air inlet vanes.
Round routers only need a round tube. Oversize the tube and use a reducing bushing with an ID to fit your motor.

Square ended router motors need a little more creativity. There are a host of square to round PVC adapters found in the “Big Box” chain stores' plumbing departments and they are also used in storm water drainage systems. Fernco also makes an extensive product line. In addition, look to vinyl guttering components. Also, don't skip by the HVAC section either. There is a vast variety of adapters available. There isn't anything saying that you can't use a length of square tube. There are a host DC fittings that may work. You could even fix the tube aka snorkel to the bottom of the box and let the router motor slide freely up and down in the tube. You could make this square tube from thin plywood or even FRP.

Now, as to the mounting. There are many options available; hose clamps, Velcro, Tywraps, mechanical (screws, nutserts, etc.). Mechanical method would be preferred if you have a thick motor cap and there's plenty of clearance under the cap to give the end of your mechanical fastener room so the fastener doesn't damage anything.

Velcro:

For that to work, (slide on - slide off can be tad difficult) barrier the hooks and loops w/ a plastic putty knife(s). Set the snorkel. Remove the putty knife(s).
To separate the H&L to remove the snorkel, slide/work the putty knife(s) in between the H&L to release one from the other.) Remove the snorkel.

Notes:
An open bottom box won't work all that well if there are drawers under the router box, nor will the snorkel through bottom or a bottom mounted DC boot unless they are designed into the table. Venting and DC will work if installed through the back or side of the box. Whatever you do, you need to arrange for make up air (venting/cooling) and pickup for for the DC simultaneously. There many variables here but all in all this should give you plenty of ideas to work w/ for/on a finished system that will work well for you. See the pictures for more ideas.......


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This is by Stick486

One very important thing you have to remember is to make sure your router box is vented w/ outside air for the motor or you will cook the motor from excessive heat because of the lack of cooling air for the motor...

An open bottom box won't work all that well if there are drawers under the router box

Is this the reason why Bosch changed router table design?

The white colored Bosch RA1171 is an enclosed cabinet (partially enclosed, the rear face is actually open)

The blue colored Bosch RA1181 is open in both the front and the rear.



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Is this the reason why Bosch changed router table design?

The white colored Bosch RA1171 is an enclosed cabinet (partially enclosed, the rear face is actually open)

The blue colored Bosch RA1181 is open in both the front and the rear.



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"Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men..." :smile:

Neither one has any connection for a bottom hose so I suspect it may just be a "marketing" thing...can't imagine they put that much "strategic intent" in the design of the two tables.

...just thinkin' out loud...
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
"Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men..." :smile:

Neither one has any connection for a bottom hose so I suspect it may just be a "marketing" thing...can't imagine they put that much "strategic intent" in the design of the two tables.

...just thinkin' out loud...
unless they are trying to cut back on the number of burned up router motors they were warrantying...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·

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I did up a response earlier this morning but it's missing. Maybe I forgot to actually post it?
In any case, further to what Stick suggests, I'm guessing there were problems caused by users not having any dust/chip collection to the previous partially closed in table.
Accumulating waste material would undoubtedly have seriously impacted ventilation within the table enclosure.
 

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Wow... not a whole lot of love for Bosch router tables around here. Thanks for the heads up... as I was thinking of getting one of these two tables for my Bosch 1613EVS.

Sounds like I should look at a different style/brand of table?
 

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Wow... not a whole lot of love for Bosch router tables around here. Thanks for the heads up... as I was thinking of getting one of these two tables for my Bosch 1613EVS.

Sounds like I should look at a different style/brand of table?

Herb...probably more the case is that folks on here have experienced a purchased table and would rather build their own with bottom dust collection. It probably doesn't matter what brand might have been discussed.

I have the 1181...lots of good things about it but missing one critical function...bottom dust collection... It does have a 2 1/2" port on the fence...works ok depending on the router you have in it.

I have installed many routers in mine and none allow capturing all the sawdust from above. Even those routers that have dust collection shields blow dust all over the bottom side. It has lots of nooks and crannies where dust collects and requires cleaning almost after each operation.

The top is all aluminum and if you don't wax it frequently, it shares some of itself in the form of black marks on your project piece.

Since it is plastic and aluminum it is noisy as hell...everything is amplified as the plastic has no backing...just grid lines underneath that capture dust.

I like the independently adjustable fences...allows for offsetting the outfeed for joinery..but the track that holds the fingerboards is set back which requires a spacer that is tough to manage when deploying the fingerboards.

The fence material is like fine particle board. The bolts that hold it are carriage bolts and eventually they wear into the boards and then are loose and the boards need to be replaced. Offset fence adjustment is accomplished with spacers (1/16 and 1/32 are supplied)

Bosch also made the same table for Craftsman...Pro or Deluxe models, I think...may be a better deal there if you like the 1181...it's the same table, same parts, etc...

When I get the time I will be building my own table with better dust collection and getting rid of the 1181...just too much dust to deal with.

Let me know if you need more info...Nick
 
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Moderators...

Maybe some of these posts should be in a different thread...? So they don't disrupt the original intent...?
 

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Moderators...

Maybe some of these posts should be in a different thread...? So they don't disrupt the original intent...?

"Disrupt the original intent"???

The original intent of my reading the Stickies on RouterForums.com was to get answers to all my router questions. And your very detailed post went the furthest anyone has ever taken me in solving a question I had often wondered about... what makes a good router table.

So your post is not only on pointe, and belongs here... it also could belong to other forum topics/categories. Therefore if anything, your post should be copied to other places, not moved.

Thanks for your elucidating response Nick.
 

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I’ll leave it up to Stick if he wants the somewhat off topic posts moved. Herb there is another sticky thread about people’s home made router tables in the sub forum Table Mounted Routing. It’s a long thread and has been viewed about 470,000 times. You’ll find all manner of designs for tables there to inspire you. All the sub forums are accessed by clicking on the large Routerforums logo and scrolling down. As Nick said, most of us who have been at this for a while have preferred building our own tables. That way we get the features we want. Sometimes it takes a few tables to try different things and figure out what they are. I’ve built a few (as in at least 6) and I’ve made some pretty good ones for $5-10 by using scraps from other jobs.
 
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This is the correct thread. It looks like I created two threads, one with the posts and one without. I see the original sticky thread has been closed. John may have done that to keep chatter out of it. If someone has something pertinent to the original intent one of the mods can open it long enough to add the new information or it can be copied into it by one of us from another thread.
 
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