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Hi
I live in Australia and am thinking of buying a Bosch 12 v flexi click cordless drill kit from America. May I ask what voltage and hertz etc you have in America please?

Thanking you in anticipation
regards
Peteroo1
 

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120vac 60htz...
 

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You would probably need an adapter (step down transformer) Peter but they are easily available.
 

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Our home electrical power is 120 vac 60 Hertz (cycles) or 240 vac and there are higher voltages and 3 phase power available for industry both in Delta and Wye configurations, all being at 60 Hertz. Most small hand tools and household appliances drawing 1500 Watts or less are usually set to run on 120 vac.

I'm not very familiar with the Bosch line, but many rechargeable battery power tools sold here have chargers that can be run either on 120 or 240 vac however, the plug provided by the manufacturer for use here will likely be for our 120 volts. You should talk to customer service for Bosch Power Tools to find out what they offer regarding this. Other members with Bosch Tools should be able to help further and will likely respond to your post very soon..

Charley
 

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Seems to me one of our Aussie bretheren has done precisely what you're planning, and I think it was Harry Sinclair @harrysin , Most Euro AC runs at 50 Hz, not 60.

Here's an article on the topic. Doesn't look good.

Operating 60Hz Electrical Appliances at 50Hz

As a general rule it may be unsafe to operate 115V 60Hz rated appliances at 115V 50Hz. Operating 60Hz appliances at 50Hz may result in excessive heat buildup in transformers or in certain types of electric motors.

If you wish to safely operate 115V 60Hz appliances at 115V 50Hz then the following steps can be attempted:

Contact the manufacturer of the appliance. It may be possible to safely operate at 50Hz with the manufacturer's approval.

See if an alternate 240V 50Hz or 115V 50Hz power supply or electrical motor is available. Some manufacturers sell the same appliance or electric tool in many countries around the world and may be able to retrofit the power supply or electrical motor to 240V 50Hz. Some regions of Japan have 100V 50Hz supplies while others have 100V 60Hz supplies so it is not uncommon for Japanese manufactured electrical devices to have 50Hz solutions.

It is possible to purchase 60Hz sine wave power systems that take 240V 50Hz on input and produce 115V 60Hz on output. These solutions are generally very expensive, and it is usually more cost effective just to replace the tool or appliance. See here for a high current frequency conversion solution.

If these solutions, for one reason or another, do not work then there are only two further choices: dispose of the appliance or tool, or attempt to operate the appliance or tool at 50Hz and in the process potentially create a situation where the power supply or the motors in the appliance or tool are rendered non-operational.

If the decision is made to destructively test a 115V 60Hz appliance or tool at 115V 50Hz then the following information may be of help:

Potentially destructive testing of 115V appliances can lead to smoke, sparks, flame and can create an electrocution hazard.
Cheap internal 115V 60Hz transformers in electronics may overheat if run at 50Hz.
Most modern switching power supplies can run at 50Hz or 60Hz, however it would be unusual for such a power supply to not be labeled as 50/60Hz.
"Universal" electric motors generally do not care about power frequency. A 115V 60Hz universal motor can typically be expected to operate correctly at 50Hz or even at 115V DC. Many inexpensive power tools use universal motors, likewise many vacuum cleaners and household kitchen appliances use universal motors.
Universal motors can be usually be identified by both of the following features:
The use of replaceable carbon brushes in the motor. These will be identified in the spare parts section of the appliance or tool's user manual.
Universal motors tend to be very loud.
115V 60Hz induction motors:
May experience excessive heat buildup if run at 50Hz.
Will operate at fewer revolutions per minute. When a 60Hz induction motor is operated at 50Hz the motor will run at 5/6ths of its RPM's at 60Hz.
The heat buildup may cause failure of the motor. To avoid heat buildup in induction motors ensure the voltage-to-frequency ratio is preserved. This means that a 115V 60Hz induction motor should see 96V to maintain the voltage-to-frequency ratio at 50Hz. Hammond make a 115V->95V 2000W step down autotransformer, the 168J. Using the 168J implies that an appropriate 240V->115V 50Hz transformer is available.
 

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In Turkey, if we wanted to run American appliances, we had to have transformers, most had it wired in to the power line inside the home, so we could just plug whatever in to any outlet. We had an electric washer, drier, mixer, and not sure what all else, but had no issues in two years.

Basically, the same in Thailand, except I just had a transformer that plugged into a wall, just for a radio and small TV. Worked out just fine, until my then girlfriend plugged the TV into the wall socket, after I very specifically told her that it HAD to be plugged into the transformer, or it would blow up. Well, it didn't blow up, but it certainly blew all the circuits inside it.
 

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Why from america?

apart from the electrical supply issue, have you found out how much the shipping, import duty, shippers handling fees, and then VAT on the whole thing will come to?

The fees on anything bought in america and shipped to the UK almost doubles the original purchase cost to your door. I suspect australia will be the same.
 

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The standard US electric supply is as @Stick486 said. I lived in the Philippines for much of 1983-84 (yes, 1984 was the longest year of my life). The Philippine electrical supply is 220V 50Hz. I had among other things a $3000 sound system and TV brought from the US. We had no problem obtaining a transformer that allowed the m to work perfectly, and return to the US and work well upon return. I woud expect the same to be true in Australia. By all means get such a transformer.
 
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The standard US electric supply is as @Stick486 said. I lived in the Philippines for much of 1983-84 (yes, 1984 was the longest year of my life). The Philippine electrical supply is 220V 50Hz. I had among other things a $3000 sound system and TV brought from the US. We had no problem obtaining a transformer that allowed the m to work perfectly, and return to the US and work well upon return. I would expect the same to be true in Australia. By all means get such a transformer.
or buy the charger that is designed for use in Australia...
 
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@ sunnybob,adding to your comment Bob, I ordered a blade cover/guard for my grandson's mitre saw--$11.00 US--$39.00 AUD. Coil spring for same saw --$4.00 US--$18.00 AUD..Jamesjj777746
 

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@ sunnybob,adding to your comment Bob, I ordered a blade cover/guard for my grandson's mitre saw--$11.00 US--$39.00 AUD. Coil spring for same saw --$4.00 US--$18.00 AUD..Jamesjj777746
I should have said I bought these parts from a local store.I was just commenting on the price differences between AUS. and USA.
 

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Bosch Tool are readily available in Australia and imported as 240 volts too, with warranty too, so why would you buy one made for the USA that would have no warranty when you can buy Bosch tools here? N
USA prices are very cheap compared to many other countries prices for the same thing. Thats because the USA market is so huge that economies of scale can reduce costs and retail taxes are very low.

An outsider who is not familiar with import / export will look at something in their own country for say equivalent $600, and then look online at american prices of $300.
So at first glance, they can save 50%.
BUT...... Shipping outside america adds a $100,
Customs import duty adds 20% of total =$80
Then in the UK and I believe also australia there is retail tax of 20% of total = $96.

Suddenly at your doorstep that 300 dollar tool is now
300
100
80
96
=576
where you can buy it local for another 24 dollars.

Its a "buyer beware" situation.
 

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USA prices are very cheap compared to many other countries prices for the same thing. Thats because the USA market is so huge that economies of scale can reduce costs and retail taxes are very low.

An outsider who is not familiar with import / export will look at something in their own country for say equivalent $600, and then look online at american prices of $300.
So at first glance, they can save 50%.
BUT...... Shipping outside america adds a $100,
Customs import duty adds 20% of total =$80
Then in the UK and I believe also australia there is retail tax of 20% of total = $96.

Suddenly at your doorstep that 300 dollar tool is now
300
100
80
96
=576
where you can buy it local for another 24 dollars.

Its a "buyer beware" situation.
Oh I see, you are doing it to try to save money, no way I buy a new power tool without warranty in an effort to save a few bucks. N
 

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Seems to me one of our Aussie bretheren has done precisely what you're planning, and I think it was Harry Sinclair @harrysin , Most Euro AC runs at 50 Hz, not 60.

Here's an article on the topic. Doesn't look good.

Operating 60Hz Electrical Appliances at 50Hz

As a general rule it may be unsafe to operate 115V 60Hz rated appliances at 115V 50Hz. Operating 60Hz appliances at 50Hz may result in excessive heat buildup in transformers or in certain types of electric motors.

If you wish to safely operate 115V 60Hz appliances at 115V 50Hz then the following steps can be attempted:

Contact the manufacturer of the appliance. It may be possible to safely operate at 50Hz with the manufacturer's approval.

See if an alternate 240V 50Hz or 115V 50Hz power supply or electrical motor is available. Some manufacturers sell the same appliance or electric tool in many countries around the world and may be able to retrofit the power supply or electrical motor to 240V 50Hz. Some regions of Japan have 100V 50Hz supplies while others have 100V 60Hz supplies so it is not uncommon for Japanese manufactured electrical devices to have 50Hz solutions.

It is possible to purchase 60Hz sine wave power systems that take 240V 50Hz on input and produce 115V 60Hz on output. These solutions are generally very expensive, and it is usually more cost effective just to replace the tool or appliance. See here for a high current frequency conversion solution.

If these solutions, for one reason or another, do not work then there are only two further choices: dispose of the appliance or tool, or attempt to operate the appliance or tool at 50Hz and in the process potentially create a situation where the power supply or the motors in the appliance or tool are rendered non-operational.

If the decision is made to destructively test a 115V 60Hz appliance or tool at 115V 50Hz then the following information may be of help:

Potentially destructive testing of 115V appliances can lead to smoke, sparks, flame and can create an electrocution hazard.
Cheap internal 115V 60Hz transformers in electronics may overheat if run at 50Hz.
Most modern switching power supplies can run at 50Hz or 60Hz, however it would be unusual for such a power supply to not be labeled as 50/60Hz.
"Universal" electric motors generally do not care about power frequency. A 115V 60Hz universal motor can typically be expected to operate correctly at 50Hz or even at 115V DC. Many inexpensive power tools use universal motors, likewise many vacuum cleaners and household kitchen appliances use universal motors.
Universal motors can be usually be identified by both of the following features:
The use of replaceable carbon brushes in the motor. These will be identified in the spare parts section of the appliance or tool's user manual.
Universal motors tend to be very loud.
115V 60Hz induction motors:
May experience excessive heat buildup if run at 50Hz.
Will operate at fewer revolutions per minute. When a 60Hz induction motor is operated at 50Hz the motor will run at 5/6ths of its RPM's at 60Hz.
The heat buildup may cause failure of the motor. To avoid heat buildup in induction motors ensure the voltage-to-frequency ratio is preserved. This means that a 115V 60Hz induction motor should see 96V to maintain the voltage-to-frequency ratio at 50Hz. Hammond make a 115V->95V 2000W step down autotransformer, the 168J. Using the 168J implies that an appropriate 240V->115V 50Hz transformer is available.
You are talking about AC motors. Much of the electronics made today is designed for international distribution and use what are known as switching power supplies. If you look at the data plate it will often say something like 100 to 240 volts, 50 to 60 hz Just the plug may need to be changed or an adapter plug used.That could be the case with the battery charger in question. Also even when using a step up or step down transformer, things lke power supplies are not nearly as fussy as AC motors with a shift from 60 to 50 hz. Even with motors it is often not nearly as bad as you have read.

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