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Okay. I am the first to admit that I am a rank amateur while working with wood. Still, I have all of these red oak church pews, and no idea what to do with them.

Can you point me to a handy dandy idea book or site to steer me in the right direction? I have a lot of tools, and a CNC router table. Almost no knowledge of how to deal with wood though. I know it is a CRAFT that must be learned, and I am sure that if any project was posted here as a challenge, my submission would be the absolute crappiest.

People have complimented me on my redwood decks. I tell them, "You can be 1/2" off in all directions on a deck, and it will still look beautiful! Try that margin of error while making a piano!" Fine detail is my Kryptonite. :cry:

I want to make something that I CAN make out of this wood. So I won't attempt any inlay work or puzzle joints or anything fancy. Just simple things that I can make and sell. A man in my town makes wood bee traps! A block of wood with a jar on the bottom and a diagonal hole through the block. I am a BIT more talented than that, but you won't see me making any jewelry boxes or violins!

I am open to suggestions!

Joe
 

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I would be tempted to start with something small...Errors create less sawdust.....LOL..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am thinking that if I can find something that I can make, and I can make them "cute" enough, I might be able to set up a booth at Christmas time, and sell them all at once.

Joe
 

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I'd start by thinking about anything unique about your community. One guy here makes Polish Eagle plaques and sells the heck out of them, but that may be too advanced. A guy in our one and only mall takes a booth every year and sells pretty little "band saw" boxes, you need a band saw with a skinny blade to make them. His are in all kinds of shapes, from ovals, to circles, squares. stars, butterflies. There's a lot of videos on youtube on how to do it, but you start by cutting oversize blanks, gluing and clamping them together, then you draw the shape, and follow the instructions on YouTube. Finishing is really important, so study that a bit too. You can use synthetics with semi to glossy surfaces, on top of whatever color you choose. Or you can do simple things like linseed oil and wax.

If you area has some special identity, study that and see what kinds of things fit that identity. Make a lot of things and your abilities will improve tremendously very fast. All of us have learned from our mistakes. Have a wonderful time of it. And if you have as much oak as you said, you may be able to sell a little of it to pay for, say, a benchtop band saw like the WEN that I like and use a lot. It has more power and better blade guides than the little peanut models for sale cheap. I ordered mine from a woodworking store, and another for a friend from Amazon. With a half inch blade, you can do a lot, and there are a lot of used Delta style band saws out there.

An old member here made this simple little wine bottle holder that consists of one sheet of wood, cut and drilled so it supports a bottle of wine horizontally. She also made a lot of little cut out creatures as garden trolls and figurines that she sold.

By the way, I didn't check but be sure to list the tools you have on your profile so we can make more informed suggestions. And remember, we LOVE questions.
 

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People have complimented me on my redwood decks. I tell them, "You can be 1/2" off in all directions on a deck, and it will still look beautiful! Try that margin of error while making a piano!" Fine detail is my Kryptonite. :cry:
Joe
Joe - in my previous profession, (sign painting), we have the "60/60 Rule" - which means at sixty feet away and sixty miles an hour, nobody is going to see the crooked lines, brush marks, or trash in the paint.
not so in something that you can hold in your hands or sit at or be 24" away from it at any given time.
so yes, some degree of accuracy is a requirement - not an option.
looking forward to seeing some of your projects when you get started.
 

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Okay. I am the first to admit that I am a rank amateur while working with wood. Still, I have all of these red oak church pews, and no idea what to do with them.

Can you point me to a handy dandy idea book or site to steer me in the right direction? I have a lot of tools, and a CNC router table. Almost no knowledge of how to deal with wood though. I know it is a CRAFT that must be learned, and I am sure that if any project was posted here as a challenge, my submission would be the absolute crappiest.

People have complimented me on my redwood decks. I tell them, "You can be 1/2" off in all directions on a deck, and it will still look beautiful! Try that margin of error while making a piano!" Fine detail is my Kryptonite. :cry:

I want to make something that I CAN make out of this wood. So I won't attempt any inlay work or puzzle joints or anything fancy. Just simple things that I can make and sell. A man in my town makes wood bee traps! A block of wood with a jar on the bottom and a diagonal hole through the block. I am a BIT more talented than that, but you won't see me making any jewelry boxes or violins!

I am open to suggestions!

Joe
Depending on how many you have, try making some loveseats for the porch. This is an instant sale. People love the idea that it came from a church. As a bonus, it's super easy. The leftover cutoffs backs and seats can be used for other things.
 

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Okay. I am the first to admit that I am a rank amateur while working with wood. Still, I have all of these red oak church pews, and no idea what to do with them.

Can you point me to a handy dandy idea book or site to steer me in the right direction? I have a lot of tools, and a CNC router table. Almost no knowledge of how to deal with wood though. I know it is a CRAFT that must be learned, and I am sure that if any project was posted here as a challenge, my submission would be the absolute crappiest.

People have complimented me on my redwood decks. I tell them, "You can be 1/2" off in all directions on a deck, and it will still look beautiful! Try that margin of error while making a piano!" Fine detail is my Kryptonite. :cry:

I want to make something that I CAN make out of this wood. So I won't attempt any inlay work or puzzle joints or anything fancy. Just simple things that I can make and sell. A man in my town makes wood bee traps! A block of wood with a jar on the bottom and a diagonal hole through the block. I am a BIT more talented than that, but you won't see me making any jewelry boxes or violins!

I am open to suggestions!

Joe
I highly recommend “ WOODWORKING WITH THE ROUTER “ by Bill Hilton and Fred Matlack. I like it so much I have a copy I keep where I sit & 1 in my shop. If your interested in more there’s a couple of more I’d recommend. As you are I am new to woodworking and learning EVERYTHING about woodworking from Trial & Error ( expensive ) reading, YouTube and sites just like this. I had hoped I could connect with people in my area ( Central North Ga , South Eastern Tn or South Western Nc) that would at the very least be willing to show me stuff as they worked. Better yet show me how to do things I had questions about. But so far no such luck.
 

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I really enjoy making clocks. Give it a go. They are a ton of fun to make. They are only limited by your imagination.

But don't do what I did. Start small and work your way up. My first clock was a grandfather clock of my own design with some borrowed features from some clocks I liked. Looks good but sounds horrible and pretty terrible design construction. Didn't really know what I was doing in regards to clocks. Also if you use mechanical movement make sure you can access them for cleaning. I was not really aware of that starting out. I am now a huge fan of electronic movements but again you need to be able to put in batteries at some point.

And share pictures when you start. Love to see what folks are building. :)
 

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I highly recommend “ WOODWORKING WITH THE ROUTER “ by Bill Hilton and Fred Matlack. I like it so much I have a copy I keep where I sit & 1 in my shop. If your interested in more there’s a couple of more I’d recommend. As you are I am new to woodworking and learning EVERYTHING about woodworking from Trial & Error ( expensive ) reading, YouTube and sites just like this. I had hoped I could connect with people in my area ( Central North Ga , South Eastern Tn or South Western Nc) that would at the very least be willing to show me stuff as they worked. Better yet show me how to do things I had questions about. But so far no such luck.
Rockler's Sandy Creek location has some classes and I believe a woodworkers club that shows up. Near Lilburn? Gwinnett woodworkers association is located there. Google "Woodworkers Clubs Near Me" and see where it leads you.
 
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