Router Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently inherited an older Craftsman table saw from my late father-in-law. The table is in good shape, the blade spindle is good, and the lift/tilt mechanism is also good. He had a newer Craftsman power-tool motor with it, but it was not attached and working. The saw has its original 2" diameter double pulley, for a matched pair of thin belts. The motor has a single wider 2-1/2" pulley, but it is bent. Sears doesn't have replacement parts, and I haven't found similar belts & pulleys anywhere.

The saw takes a 9" blade. The motor is 1 HP, 3450 RPM.

SO, what's the best way to get the thing running? I'm thinking of using a pair of cast-iron pulleys, 2-1/2" diameter (should have sufficient clearance), and a single wider (class A) belt. As far as I can tell, that setup should be able to transfer 1 HP at that speed.

Any thoughts?

Mike
 

·
Super Moderator
John
Joined
·
6,962 Posts
Mike
Table saw blades should run about 3500 RPM, your motor runs 3450 and as long as you use two pulleys of the same diameter I believe you'll be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
435 Posts
Is it possible your FIL was planning on connecting the 2 1/2 pulley to the 2 incher on the saw as this was what the saw had originally? I wonder if you did some searching on the net with the saw part number whether you could get a good answer? I did a quick search and there was a lot of info on Craftsman 9 inch saws including replacement parts.
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Mike you'll need to check a few things. Do both motors have the same mounting pattern? Some saws used a mounting pattern that wasn't common. My Unisaw is supposed to be one of them.
Another thing you'll need to check if you use the larger pulley is the clearance under the table when the saw blade is fully raised. One reason they used the small pulleys is to gain maximum depth of cut. You may be able to use the larger pulleys if it either doesn't touch the table or you can limit the trunnion travel and don't mind a little less height on the blade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Good points to double-check

Thanks Chuck,

I initially checked the motor mount and clearance, but it never hurts to double-check important things like that.

I would like to be able to raise the blade to maximum height. Good 9" blades are a bit pricey, and I have a stock of nice 8" blades I would like to be able to use. So I will be sure to double-check the clearance.

Mike you'll need to check a few things. Do both motors have the same mounting pattern? Some saws used a mounting pattern that wasn't common. My Unisaw is supposed to be one of them.
Another thing you'll need to check if you use the larger pulley is the clearance under the table when the saw blade is fully raised. One reason they used the small pulleys is to gain maximum depth of cut. You may be able to use the larger pulleys if it either doesn't touch the table or you can limit the trunnion travel and don't mind a little less height on the blade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Pulley diameters?

My guess is that my FIL was trying to decide what to do with his old saw, when he bought a big radial arm saw to replace it, and he never finished with the old table saw. Unfortunately, I didn't meet him until he had stopped working on his hobbies, and was in his last days.

The two pulleys take different width belts, so I don't think he would have tried using them together. Even 20 years ago, it may have been tough to find original parts for a saw made around 1960. The only manual I have found does not have the motor or its pulley shown in the diagram or parts list. So I'm not sure what it had originally. The model number is 103.20001

As Semipro pointed out, the blade speed should be good with equal-size pulleys.

Thanks,

Mike

Is it possible your FIL was planning on connecting the 2 1/2 pulley to the 2 incher on the saw as this was what the saw had originally? I wonder if you did some searching on the net with the saw part number whether you could get a good answer? I did a quick search and there was a lot of info on Craftsman 9 inch saws including replacement parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Single belt

If I recall correctly, my father had a Craftsman table saw similar to this one, and it had a single belt. I think this may have been a "deluxe" model, and the twin belt system may have been a premium feature. I'm not sure what the advantage was -- less vibration, perhaps?

I've never seen one of those linkbelts in use. They sound good based on sellers' claims. I might try one, but given the higher cost, I think I'll make sure the saw works properly first!

Thanks,

Mike

Hey, Mike; my Delta Contractor TS has a 1 1/2HP motor with single pulley/belt; works just fine. A number of members have tried linkbelts and have mostly really good things to say about them. Less vibration being the main 'two thumbs up' apparently.
Lee Valley Tools
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Hi Mike,

I use the link belt on my 10" Craftsman Table Saw. I am glad I switched. With the link belt, the saw runs very smooth. Before, if my saw would sit a while ( a few hours to overnight or longer) it would vibrate when it was started and take about a minute to smooth out the kinks in the belt before it would run smoothly. Now with the link belt, it is instantly smooth when I start the saw. The proof to me was the nickel test. I can stand a nickle on edge on the saw table, then start the saw. With the link belt, the nickel would remain standing on its edge when I start the saw. I no longer have to wait for the kinks in the belt to smooth out when starting before I can use the saw.

Glenn
 

·
Retired Moderator
Joined
·
16,385 Posts
Mike, I don't think that there should be a problem finding pulleys. Motors have standard size shafts and there are a lot of pulleys made to fit them. Any industrial supply should be able to help you. Just look in the Yellow Pages for ones that sell power transmission products. Most bearing supply stores should also stock pulleys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
255 Posts
I have used the HF link belts on two table saws and a band saw. The work great and as Glenn said they cut vibration. Another advantage is the adjustable length. I keep the left over parts and soon will have enough of them for one more belt. When I was young I remember similar belts that were for emergency replacement and pretty much a joke among mechanics. Things change.

On the saw pulley for two belts that seems odd. I have some old 10 inch table saws that only have only one belt. It seems like a 9 inch blade would take less power to turn than a 10 inch. The pulleys are a common size and should be easy to find. If all you need is one belt and one pulley that would set you up with what is probably a good saw for almost nothing.

How are the old saws that had a joiner using a common motor set up? Could that be the second belt?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
802 Posts
I have to agree with John (Semipro), as long as you stay with a 1 to 1 ratio you can't go wrong. You can find pulleys on Amazon, just put in the bore diam. and the OD. Also most bearing supply houses also have pulleys, or access to them.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top