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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, That didn't take long...
I fixed my Z hight issue by putting a sheet of 1/4 plywood smaller than the molded "trough" in the water tray between it and the spoilboard.
My brother needed a 6×8 black granite oval so I started cutting conservatively at 1/16" depth per pass and 20 ipm.
Did fine for 2 passes until a got bored watching and bumped it up to 40 ipm and the clamps couldn't handle the side pressure and let go and sent the bit through the middle of the oval. 😞
There's always a bright side, so now I know that the machine and bit can handle a 3/16" pass depth at 40ipm!!!
Although it did start glowing and smoking even under water. 🙂

https://youtu.be/vT_0-hzK7xw
 

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Well, That didn't take long...
I fixed my Z hight issue by putting a sheet of 1/4 plywood smaller than the molded "trough" in the water tray between it and the spoilboard.
My brother needed a 6×8 black granite oval so I started cutting conservatively at 1/16" depth per pass and 20 ipm.
Did fine for 2 passes until a got bored watching and bumped it up to 40 ipm and the clamps couldn't handle the side pressure and let go and sent the bit through the middle of the oval. 😞
There's always a bright side, so now I know that the machine and bit can handle a 3/16" pass depth at 40ipm!!!
Although it did start glowing and smoking even under water. 🙂

https://youtu.be/vT_0-hzK7xw
OUCH!
Herb
 

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I hate to laugh at your pain but it looks like you at least have a good attitude about it. And even learned something new!
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I hate to laugh at your pain but it looks like you at least have a good attitude about it. And even learned something new!
Go ahead and laugh!! You're the one who just said "Thanks for posting this up. It shows that the limits to these CNC machines are only in our heads!"

Your day is coming buddy!!! Just make sure you post pictures too!!! 🙂 🙂
 

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David
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That's a little like my accidental 600 ipm cut a few weeks ago. I think that going forward we all need to video anything new we're doing or any time we're pushing the machines past our normal. Video in widescreen like Joe did here, please, and make sure we see the excitement! :wink:

Will you get another piece of granite and try the cut again?

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
That's a little like my accidental 600 ipm cut a few weeks ago. I think that going forward we all need to video anything new we're doing or any time we're pushing the machines past our normal. Video in widescreen like Joe did here, please, and make sure we see the excitement! <a href="http://www.routerforums.com/images/RouterForums_2015/smilies/tango_face_wink.png" border="0" alt="" title="Wink" >:)</a>

Will you get another piece of granite and try the cut again?

David
Absolutely David. I refuse to be beaten by a piece of rock!!! 🙂
If I can conquer Granite, then the marble, soapstone, sandstone and the rest will be easy. I'm really starting to see why not many people are going down this muddy wet path. 😉
 

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Go ahead and laugh!! You're the one who just said "Thanks for posting this up. It shows that the limits to these CNC machines are only in our heads!"

Your day is coming buddy!!! Just make sure you post pictures too!!! 🙂 🙂

LOL... I will definitely share my mistakes! I almost had my first one too so I my laughing might have jinxed me. I hit move to X,Y, Zero and almost broke my first $35 end mill because I didn't move my clamps when I knew I had to before moving the gantry!
 

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To be initiated into the CNC club, your first step is to break an expensive bit, preferably a new one on it's first or second cut.

That's also why aluminum clamps work better. They will get scars.
 

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David
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To be initiated into the CNC club, your first step is to break an expensive bit, preferably a new one on it's first or second cut.

That's also why aluminum clamps work better. They will get scars.
On the rare occasion when I use clamps they are wood, which is not often since I mostly use screws flush with the top of the work piece and going directly into the spoilboard (it's a 'spoil' board, so I spoil it... :grin: ). I still don't want to hit a clamp, though.

David
 
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