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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Quality miter gauge for table saw

Guys I'm watching a YouTube video and I see the guy was pushing material threw with an Incra miter gauge as he was building drawers .
My GI came with one but I'm sure it's antiquated . I see there's different versions on Amazon.ca and this one is expensive .

http://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B000051WSF?keywords=Incra miter&qid=1437366783&ref_=sr_1_7&sr=8-7

Do I need this or just tough it out with the mediocre one from GI ?

I just read the reviews and for the money they weren't stellar . Funny as usually Incra is top notch ?

Sorry I forgot to mention this is for my table saw
 

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A good miter gauge is a must and will save money and time. having no or little confidence if the gauge has returned and will hold the 90 degree setting or if it will/will not wobble in the miter gauge slot.

Several years ago, I was gifted with the Incra 1000SE. OEM gauge was a PITA to adjust and return to 90 degrees. Degree markings were at best crude

The 1000 SE is very good gauge. Has a versatile and stout work flip stop with an accurate measuring tape. Holds its settings and the miter gauge bar is adjustable to fit the miter gauge slot. Easy to read degree scale. Believe the fences extends to 30/31". The few times that I needed a longer fence, I fabricated one from scrap plyw'd or MDF.

I added a MDF sub-fence extending to right of the blade to act as a sweep and am still able to utilize the flip stop.

At one time, I had an Accu Miter(??) gauge. Found it was too big, bulky, cumbersome, end heavy. Plus it was very expensive.

Know of woodworkers who like the Kreg and Osborne gauge.

Worth considering the 1000SE if you are looking for a new miter gauge.

If there is a well stocked tool emporium near by might be worthwhile to take a culture trip and handle the gauges. Seems to me that miter gauges is a personal selection tool and 'Ya' just might find one that you like better.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks Guys .
Ray there's nothing well stocked here lol . Everything is order or drive for four hours
 

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I've had the Osborne for several years and find it is extremely accurate and the indicated angles are very accurate. That said, the most accurate device I have is a Rockler sled. I used a large draftsman's triangle to get the perfect 90, then adjusted the transparent indicator line to bisect the zero marker. I then checked the 45 with the same square and found the built in scale was right on. When I want something precise, I use the Rockler sled whenever I can. It also has a cutoff support that goes on the other side of the fence to support the cutoff portion. The swing arm is such that putting on a stop block is easy. You can also extend the arm by putting on a sacrificial piece of flat hardwood. Here's a link Table Saw Crosscut Sled - Rockler Woodworking Tools. I do keep it on a special shelf with supports so it doesn't rest on the miter bar. It sits handy, next to the table saw so it has little chance to warp.

The only problem I have with the Osborne is very minor; the miter bar is fairly long (adjustable for fit as well), so it is not stable until the fence part is on the table, so depending on your saw, you can only cross cut about a 12 inch wide piece. But as I said, the problem is minor. Its pretty easy to clamp a stop block on it, although it does have a swing down stop bar, I just don't find the stop bar to be solid enough to suit me.

Then again, you can make your own sled and make the leading portion longer so it is very stable on the saw's table and you can cut a wider piece. There are lots of videos on how to make a crosscut sled. Trick is getting the fence on the sled to cut exact 90s, but it is clearly doable. The Rockler sled handles other angles neatly. I really appreciate the Rocker's precision.
 

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Rick, Fine Woodworking did a tool test a few months back on miter gauges and the JDS Accumiter won it at a (US) cost of $230. The Kreg gauge came in as best value for $140. The Incra 1000 HD scored better than the 1000SE for $30 more at $190. The 3000 model is extremely accurate but has an extra mechanism at the back that reduces the amount of bar in the slot for cutting wide boards and it was $290, $60 more than the winner. The Osborne scored very well and was only $120 but the review said it can bend when extended for longer wood so if you expect to try and put longer wood on the saw it might not be a good choice. According to review it was one of the fastest to adjust.
 
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Discussion Starter #13
Rainman, you should move to Texas. There is plenty room and there are real saw supply store nearer than where you are.


:nerd:
I would but I'm not sure if Mr.Stringer would like me hanging around his shop all the time :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I've had the Osborne for several years and find it is extremely accurate and the indicated angles are very accurate. That said, the most accurate device I have is a Rockler sled. I used a large draftsman's triangle to get the perfect 90, then adjusted the transparent indicator line to bisect the zero marker. I then checked the 45 with the same square and found the built in scale was right on. When I want something precise, I use the Rockler sled whenever I can. It also has a cutoff support that goes on the other side of the fence to support the cutoff portion. The swing arm is such that putting on a stop block is easy. You can also extend the arm by putting on a sacrificial piece of flat hardwood. Here's a link Table Saw Crosscut Sled - Rockler Woodworking Tools. I do keep it on a special shelf with supports so it doesn't rest on the miter bar. It sits handy, next to the table saw so it has little chance to warp.

The only problem I have with the Osborne is very minor; the miter bar is fairly long (adjustable for fit as well), so it is not stable until the fence part is on the table, so depending on your saw, you can only cross cut about a 12 inch wide piece. But as I said, the problem is minor. Its pretty easy to clamp a stop block on it, although it does have a swing down stop bar, I just don't find the stop bar to be solid enough to suit me.

Then again, you can make your own sled and make the leading portion longer so it is very stable on the saw's table and you can cut a wider piece. There are lots of videos on how to make a crosscut sled. Trick is getting the fence on the sled to cut exact 90s, but it is clearly doable. The Rockler sled handles other angles neatly. I really appreciate the Rocker's precision.
Tom that's interesting . I think a sled would be a great addition too .
 

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Rick,

I've had my 3000se 6 maybe 7yrs and it's become indispensable. I use it for a few cuts and or for the shorter narrower repeat lengths and the panel sled for the longer ones. But the 3000 shines with angles, even though it breaks degrees down to 1/2° you still have the ability to continue fore and aft from that 1/2° to the previous or next full °, that's dial in power that you can't beat with a stick in my book.

If I were for example a segmented bowl turner with a particular style I'd probably make a fixed jig, but the 3000 would be the tool I'd use to dial in the true angle. I was apprehensive and though the tool was expensive when I bought mine, I'm sure it more so now but I can say I've never been sorry I bought it.

A couple times a yr I reset 90° to the TS blade especially after heavy use.
I have a left tilt TS and I bought a left side 3000, (I prefer working that side) be aware even though the 3000 is aluminum it's heavy, it's long even when contracted. If you work it from the left be conscious to lift the arm when swinging it to the storage position prior to removal from the miter slot. This will protect the silica gel button on the underside of the arm and prevent it from scraping across the table.

P.S. I forgot to link the pic and I've never had the problem Ray has with setting 90°. I use a 8X12" R angle plastic drafting square and a Grip Tite magnetic feather board I use with my jointer. Once the square is snug against the fully extended blade I sit the magnet on it and it goes nowhere.
 

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Here's my baby! I forgot to upload it for the previous post. I kind of get lost and flake when Aerosmith is playing loud.
 

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Rick I am debating that issue as well. I have been using what came with the TS (Bosch 4100) and it leaves a lot to be desired. I was looking at the Incra 1000HD which is considerably cheaper than the SD and the reviews on Amazon are pretty good. There are always a few really negative reviews for almost anything you look at but overall the reviews are good. I haven't looked at the Osborne yet but I did look at the Kreg and that is not a bad unit either. Tough call so will be following your post closedly.
 
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