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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I am building my first swing cradle and had a question in regards to routing a 1/4" round over along the edge.

The plans I am going off of call for a 1/4" round over. My (newb) question is, how can I router the 1/4" round over profile where the neck meets at? I have attached a close up photo. And will I have any problems when I go around the corners of the pieces?

Normally I would think that those area would get some type of corner radius with a flush bit, but these plans call for the round over around all the edges of these pieces.

Any suggestions would be much appreciated. And just an fyi if needed, I have Bosch hand held, plunge, and palm routers. I also have a Milwaukee mounted to a routing table.

Thanks!!
 

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Ryan, (glad you changed your name from n/a) the only issue with a round over in that corner would be the size of the bearing. You can test the cut by holding the bit up to the corner to see if it is going to cut. If the bearing interferes go to a smaller bearing. Thanks for your service!
 

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Doug
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First off, your shop would definitely pass inspection! Very clean.

The bit will follow the corner just fine, but the round over will not be "perfect". I would recommend making a sample to practice on out of MDF scrap to see what it would look like. If you are fine with it, the round over is all you need.

If you don't like it, you have a few options. You can blend it by hand, or you can stop the round over an inch or so from the corner. It will be up to you what looks best. A final option is a solid pilot router bit, they can get into tighter corners, but can leave burn marks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Bob, no problem at all on the name change, I am glad that it was pointed out to me. And you are most welcome, thank you!!

KP91, I like to try and keep it as clean as possible until the wife decides she is going to randomly "set" things out in the garage. After the cradle (and baby are born) I actually want to redesign it with much needed storage space.

Thank you both for the very fast replies and the suggestions. I think I will make a small template and try it with a couple different bearing sizes. I can definitely see the standard size bearing not being able to make that trip around without hitting the other side. I that doesn't work, then I may just have to soften that area by hand.

Thanks!!
 

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Hi Ryan and glad to have you aboard. As mentioned the round over will look a little off at the junction. Another option is to not cut quite to a relatively square corner and use a sanding drum to finish the cut and create a radiused corner. The rounder over bit would follow the radiused corner perfectly.
 

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Ryan, welcome!

May I suggest another solution. Use the standard roundover bit to the corners, then when the bearing gets in the way, switch to a bit of the same radius that has no bearing. It would be test to use an edge guide or template guide and template guide to avoid cutting into the body of the neck. Depending on the source these bits are known as radius grooving or point cutting roundover bits. but they all look like the picture below and are generally used to cut internal grooves, not edge roundovers. I know these its with a 1/4 inch radius are sold by Amana and, for a few $ less, by MLCS
 

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Theo
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These guy should have answered all your questions. Me, I stopped using roundover bits long ago, I just use my ROS now. For what I do works great.

I've seen some nice cradles, but just never have been able to really like them - ever since I realized just how fast a baby will outgrow one. Then they either set around gathering dust, or you pass it on to someone, or sell it - the cradle, not the baby. MY choice of new baby thing is a rocking chair. Rock the kid to sleep, put him/her in their bed, go back to the rocker and relax for awhile. And you can use it for years. Rockers are uni too, suitable for men or women. My vote for your next project is - wait for it - a ROCKING CHAIR.
:smile:
 
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All good suggestions. If you choose to use Chucks idea of the sanding drum use caution as those things can sometimes work faster than your hands can. Being old school I would get close to the corners and finish it off with a wood rasp and/or carving chisels. I can control the progress better that way. And thank you for your service.

USN 61-65.
 

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Or add to each corner in question a piece that has a radius. Contrasting wood as an accent as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I just wanted to thank everyone for all of the suggestions. That is absolutely my favorite part of coming on forums. You get a multitude of solutions.

I really like that pilot round over bit if it will fit. I did sand down to the pencil lines originally, but should have curved the area more so the oscillating sander could have gotten in there.

I definitely have enough suggestions now. One will definitely work!! Thanks!!


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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As an after thought, too late now, but in similar situations if you use a Forstner bit and drill that corner out before you cut out the straight line part, then you will have no problem with routing the 1/4 round continuesly.
Herb
 

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Roundover

I'd have left a radius in the corner the size of the bearing, or slightly larger, instead of a "sharp" corner! Then it would not have been a concern. You could also chamfer the edges with a router bit and it would make hand finishing the inside corners easier!
 
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