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Marine Engineer
Doug
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Discussion Starter #1
Having multiple routers makes life easier, but sometimes it can get confusing with all the cords laying around. To make sure I have the right plug for the right router I have stuck a neon cable tie at each end of the router cable. Different colors on different routers make it easy to tell if the correct router is plugged in, or more importantly unpluged when changing bits.

I had used colored electrical tape before, but the cable ties work a lot better.

Safety first!
 

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The Router Guys
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768 Posts
kp91 said:
Having multiple routers makes life easier, but sometimes it can get confusing with all the cords laying around. To make sure I have the right plug for the right router I have stuck a neon cable tie at each end of the router cable. Different colors on different routers make it easy to tell if the correct router is plugged in, or more importantly unpluged when changing bits.

I had used colored electrical tape before, but the cable ties work a lot better.

Safety first!
Great tip worth 200 points, this one would fit on the daily tip rotator, may we use your tip.
 

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35mm film canister

When I don't have a bit in my table mounted router I put a black plastic 35mm film canister over the collet. This keeps debris out and this beats having to un-mount the router to turn it over to clean it. Another reason the tabletop system used on the Router Workshop is so nice, out and over in seconds.

Ed
 

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How about a not so quick tip? Please read anyway

This really happen to me 4 or 5 years ago:

I was ripping a board and the power went off. It is pitch black and the first thing I think of is getting to a flashlight hanging about a half a shop away. As I’m making my way to the flashlight the power comes back on…. So does the saw with a board still in contact with the blade. I was lucky that day. If this happens to you remember to get the power tool turned off FIRST! I learned my lesson the scary way maybe so you don’t have to.

Ed
 

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reible said:
When I don't have a bit in my table mounted router I put a black plastic 35mm film canister over the collet. This keeps debris out and this beats having to un-mount the router to turn it over to clean it. Another reason the tabletop system used on the Router Workshop is so nice, out and over in seconds.

Ed
Ed, thanks for the tip. I'll set it up for the daily tip.
 

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That's unlikely to happen here reible
All router tables, table saws and many other tools are fitted with a no voltage release switch.
If the power goes off it stays off regardless of the main coming back on.
The switch has to be turned on again as the loss of power makes the switch need resetting.
Even the cheapest bench tools have this switch, for safety.
 

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In a table mounted router and a bit is chucked up and the router not in use cover the bit or lower the bit below table height.

Same thing with a table saw, lower the blade when not in use.
 

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Dewy said:
That's unlikely to happen here reible
All router tables, table saws and many other tools are fitted with a no voltage release switch.
If the power goes off it stays off regardless of the main coming back on.
The switch has to be turned on again as the loss of power makes the switch need resetting.
Even the cheapest bench tools have this switch, for safety.
Actual that is a nice feature for safety but most tools here in the US don't bother as it is not required. Commerical equipment may or may not be equipped with "drop out switches", I know when I worked for a major company it was required on our lab tools but I have also been in some small woodworking shops where they have consumer tools......

Ed
 

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ejant said:
In a table mounted router and a bit is chucked up and the router not in use cover the bit or lower the bit below table height.

Same thing with a table saw, lower the blade when not in use.
Yes lower all blades / bits when they are not being used. Safer for you and the cutting edges.

This would make an interesting survey, I personal never leave a bit in a router, either the table mounted or handheld. I never leave a drill bit in the chuck or the key in the chuck either. How about others?

Ed
 

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I leave them in all the time. I don't always finish all my pieces that need the same setup, so I leave my workshop and go make dinner, whatever, with the bits in the router. That's the pure pleasure of having your own dedicated shop! Love it!
~Julie~
 

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Marine Engineer
Doug
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Discussion Starter #12
I take the bits out when done with a project, sometimes I do leave a bit in overnight. Of course, my expensive bits always get put back as soon as I am done with them. I lost an extra long carbide straight bit that way as it rolled onto the concrete floor.

I am pleasantly surprised at all the safety tips being shared!
 

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I never leave a drill bit in the chuck or the key in the chuck either. How about others?

Never (or rarely) leave a bit chucked up overnight.
 

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I to all ways take all bits out of routers and drills ,the hand held and the table. and I all ways put them back in there own places so they won't get chiped or broken. guys have a lot of money tied up in router bits.so handle them with respect and they will give you good service when you need them,Thank you all, Learning Herb
 

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Hay there ,I just saw the light. and I want to take this minite to say how sorry I am for being so thoughtless about those who read and write in this forum.I will never use the word guys again. Thank you Julie for your wake up call.
Thank you much ,,Learning Herb
 

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That is one of the bad things about message boards. You don't reralize the gender of the other person.

This is where names come in handy as well as introducing yourself.
 

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upcut / downcut spiral bits

Some of you new to the terms used with routers:

When someone says an upcutting bit it means the bit pulls the chips towards the router.

Downcuts are bits that push the chips away from the router.

Ed
 

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Not all straight bits are designed to do plunge cuts

Some new router users may not be aware that straight bits are either non- plunge or plunge cutting. Please check to see you have the proper type when doing plunge operations.

In general most smaller bits (less the 1/2") are not.
Bits that are plunge type usual have a cutting edge on the bottom of the bit.

Ed
 

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That's okay, Herb. I like being outnumbered by the guys! I am proud to call myself a cabinetmaker. Only thing I don't like is when I go into a store and look at tools, etc. and salesMEN talk to me as if I don't even know what a screwdriver is. Or they assume I am buying something for my husband. It's frustrating, especially since I can probably make something more beautiful out of wood than they can.
~Julie~
 
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