Router Forums banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
I know this isn't strictly speaking a router question, but I'm hoping someone can help!

I make quite a bit of furniture (as a hobby) and have a couple of routers and a belt sander among the tool collection.

Someone is very kindly offering to buy me a tool as a present, and I was thinking of a random orbital sander. That said I seem to remember (or may have made up) someone telling me a long time ago that they're not really worth it. The other option would be a planer (at the moment I use an old hand plane when necessary, and otherwise ignore changing the thickness of wood).

Any help or advice greatly appreciated: I've no idea which would be more useful (and have managed to date without either, but there's always something else to make life easier...)

Thanks in advance,

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,124 Posts
I find a random orbit sander great on my guitar bodies. I have a sanding frame for one of my belt sanders. I also have a thickness planer. I use the most appropriate tool for the job. I use a Wagner safety planer on my pillar drill and a wide drum sander on the lathe with a horizontal bed for sanding guitar neck heads and volutes, as a sort of thickness sander,
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,132 Posts
Base your choice on which would work better for you. If you need to do a lot of thicknessing then opt for the planer. The planer would also cost a little more then a sander. You can pick up a sander for around 40.00. If someone else is buying, get the planer! ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,825 Posts
Hello Ed, What i will tell you is that both are very good investments. I do not have a thickness sander, i do have a 12 inch thickness planer. the sander will take the piece of wood, and make it ready for finish. The thickness planer will make the thickness of the wood correct The orbital sander can be used on the project, and ready the project ready for finish. The r/o sander makes a nice present, and is far less e expensive. It is very useful. I hoped i answered your question, and welcome, Have a good Christmas!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,786 Posts
Hi Ed

It sounds like you are talking about a hand power planer, if that's the case take the sander,I can't think of a faster way to make to some fire wood than use a power hand planer on it.. :(


=======


Hi,
I know this isn't strictly speaking a router question, but I'm hoping someone can help!

I make quite a bit of furniture (as a hobby) and have a couple of routers and a belt sander among the tool collection.

Someone is very kindly offering to buy me a tool as a present, and I was thinking of a random orbital sander. That said I seem to remember (or may have made up) someone telling me a long time ago that they're not really worth it. The other option would be a planer (at the moment I use an old hand plane when necessary, and otherwise ignore changing the thickness of wood).

Any help or advice greatly appreciated: I've no idea which would be more useful (and have managed to date without either, but there's always something else to make life easier...)

Thanks in advance,

Ed
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,056 Posts
Ed.. I've got an 6 year old Craftsman Pro. Planer and for whatever reason, she does an absolutely beautiful job of planning. Never need to do more than just a lil prefinish sanding. (this seems to be more the exception than the rule for this line of planer though!!!) Aside from a lil snipe occasionally she perform great. its a must have in my shop. But I will say that both tools have their place. Which will provide you with the most use. A good planer will save you on sanding time!! A good ROS will save ya sanding time as well as give you a better finish. I use a 3 yr. old Dewalt ROS. Middle of the road unit to be sure, but fair enough. I've been looking at the Festool ROS's. I don't think they can be beat for performance and dust collection. Either way, me thinks if you get a good one of either, you'll be pleased...there's always fathers day.. *S*
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,056 Posts
OUCH,, yep, if its a hand planer...

no question, ROS it is....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thanks everyone. It was a hand power planer I was thinking of, not a table thicknesser: so it sounds like an ROS it is given the majority of the replies.

I've noticed some have round bases and others rectangular ones: is there much difference between the two and benefits to 1 type over the other? Thanks again
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,503 Posts
Ed,

If you check carefully you will see the Random Orbital Sanders (ROS) are round. The round disk spins while oscillating, making the scratches it leaves less visible.

If you see a square sander, it is a "pad" or "finishing" sander, and works much, much slower.

The ROS was developed to approach the sanding rate of a belt with quality nearing that finish quality of the pad sander.

Since I've purchased my ROS my finishing sander hasn't been out of the box, although they are better at getting into corners. That said, the ROS is so much quicker that it's work sanding before assembling to get around that!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
I have an old Mak 3" power planer, except for planing down door widths and closer angles, I haven't found another use for it on anything wider than the 3" blade.
Cross grain planing of the tops and bottoms of stiles never came out smooth, sometimes burning, sometimes chipping still have to sand. If something causes the planing process to stop it very difficult to pick up where you left off without creating a divot.

I've always felt safer with my jack plane on stiles. If I have to cut a door down, I razor cut the line and then cut it with a circ.

As for finish sanding I use the palm and ROS to smooth out the roughest part of joints and imperfections but always end up with a sanding block and maybe steel wool pushing in one direction with the grain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks again everyone for your help. Mind is made up. An ROS it is.

Have been looking around at reviews for models in the UK and it seems a pretty mixed bag - does anyone have any good recommendations?

Thanks again,

Ed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Just to quickly add to the last message - if it's possible to get an ROS that also helps polish wax and oils that would be even better... (should they exist?...)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,503 Posts
Yes you can, Ed. They work with any 5" or 6" ROS with a hook & loop "velcro" pad. I don't know the vendors on your side of the pond, but here's a US link.

SURBUF 5-12 PADS
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,468 Posts
I've had the same 6" Porter Cable for well over 15 yrs.
Beware, it may be difficult to find 6" discs locally, it seems everyone carries 5".

Because of it and the cost I always buy them by a 50 count box, its pretty expensive but much less than 5 count packs over an extended period and you always have them.

I don't know if all brands have the vacuum holes in the disk, it is an advantage in that it draws fines away adding longevity to the disks, (no clogging) and may add longevity to the ROS, no fines build up in the windings

One more thing, a rubber eraser, (for sanding belts, drums, etc.) work well on the ROS too.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,132 Posts
If you look in the auto section of your hardware stores you can buy refill polishing kits for auto polishers (like Simonize). They make these in various sizes an you can get them to fit a ROS. I purchased one from Canadian Tire for 10.00 and it came with the pad, one wax applicator and 3 polishing sleeves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I bought a planner over a year ago, and I do home remodeling, I dont know how I had gotton along for over 50 years without it. They are more expensive than sanders, I would get a random orbital later on, maybe a Bosch
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top