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I am going to buy a different router for my table mounted router. Will a 2.25HP be enough to do rail & stile cutting. I’m eyeing a PC item.
 

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For the table, I recommend that you consider the 3.25 hp Triton TRA001. While too heavy for me to handle freehand, it excels in the table. It also has a built-in lift so you can adjust the bit height from above the table. That is no small thing. A lift for the excellent Bosch can run 200-400 dollars, while having the lift and more power with the Triton is only about $50 more than the Bosch 1617 EVSPK or any of the other mid-sized routers that get recommendations around here. I've had the Triton for several years and really like its power and performance. You'll likely get a lot of feedback for your question.

I'm not really a Porter Cable or DeWalt fan, but since I don't own them, I really can's speak to their quality. Having looked them over in the store, I was not impressed with the build. I do have two Bosch 1617s one of which was in my table before the Triton, and performed very well. I had a Rockler lift, but I couldn't get it to lock at a set height. Another guy here bought it and says the lift works fine for him.

Not sure how experienced you are, so I'm attaching a pdf on the major things I learned that helped me speed up my learning curve. Maybe it will save you some money. It's long, but has pictures.

I'm sure Stick will shortly post a link to a great selection of documents on many aspects of tools, methods and safety. Take the time to read them, it will save you a lot of trial and error.
 

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now for the link to some helpful information....
enjoy...
 

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Welcome to the forum. You don't need a particularly large router for rails and stiles. Those bits aren't that big. It's nice to have more power to use the large raised panel bits. The mid sized routers will do it but they have to work pretty hard. Cutting part of the waste off on the table saw helps and doing it in several passes helps. For big routers the Triton gets consistent high marks.
 
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Ross
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Welcome to the forum.
 

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Welcome to the forum. As for the router I use my 1617EVSPK and it just does the job well, I have a life on mine but it will work directly attached as well. The only time i've had to really slow down how much I take off is either deep cuts or raised panel and that's normal procedure.
 

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You can definitely do rails and stiles with a 1-1/2 hp router; I did several with a porter cable 690 series router. You can use a 2-1/2 hp router to raise panels, but I'm recommend doing it in 2 passes.
 

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I'm a bit more passive and did I think three passes if not four. Even with a 3.5 HP router I'd make multiple passes just because of the amount of wood being removed and of course safety reasons as well. That and my blood doesn't seem to clot as fast these days......I've got more time than I use too as well........
 

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Using the Bosch lift has a limitation, you have to manually set the router height in the base roughly to the height you want, then use the fine adjustment to set the exact height. It is not fully adjustable from above the table. Given the price difference, I prefer the full adjustment range of the Triton. And yes, you can use the 1617 in the table without a problem. Used the Bosch setup for years and happy with it, but now I'm spoiled to the Triton's full adjustment range. The Bosch routers are my go-to for hand held routing, but whenever possible, I use the table--much safer.
 

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I agree with the 3.25 hp Triton TRA001, especially when mounted on a router table. It has a micro height adjustment feature that eliminates the need for a router lift. I would also recommend you consider the entire router table set up from Sommerfeld Tools. It dramatically simplifies the process of routing 5-part doors. It is worth every penny and routing 5-part doors, for me, is at least twice as fast, if not faster.
 

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I approached this problem a little differently. My set up is on the basis of a 3 spindle shaper. The difference is, I bought 3 Bosch 1617 routers and Rockler plates. (for less than the cost of a lift) I can pull a router out and drop another one in and just adjust the fence. It saves me a ton of time. I have the rail on one, style on the second and the panel bit on the third. I have been thinking about a fourth for door edges. One problem that I did notice with the Bosch base is there is a little play in it. Not a problem if you do your set up in the table while it is suspended. I prefer to set mine up out of the table so I don't spend all that time bent over trying to make fine adjustments. I built a little stand and set the router suspended from the plate. I can work eye level which significantly reduces set up time. It is inevitable that you will need to make another piece or two to finish the project. 2 screws drop the router you need in the table, adjust the fence. Done. I do like to take 2 or 3 passes depending on the material. Remove 95% of the material and a final pass for very clean smooth cut.

Why the 1617? The electronic speed control maintains the bit speed for a cleaner cut, it can be used as a handheld, or plunge (I bought a 4th 1617 for this purpose). These have worked reliably for 7 years.

I used the Triton at a retirement home shop and I thought it was a pain to use because of all the safety features. It was over done IMO.
 

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Absolutely. The variables are bit diameter, the larger the diameter means that outer edge is moving faster and faster as you increase size. This is a real safety issue. If you are using even a solid carbide 1/4 diameter bit will break on you when you exceed 18000 RPM. The material that you are cutting requires that you make some adjustments in speed to get a clean cut. I usually slow my bit down while hogging out material. I make a final pass at a higher speed that gives me very clean final cut that does not require a lot of prep for finishing.

The other hard learned and expensive lesson is it makes a huge difference in what quality bit you are using. Some inexpensive bits can chatter. This is where a heavy duty bit will prove its value. Lower quality bits will require frequent sharpening. You will need to spend a lot of time cleaning up the cuts before finishing.
 

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Usually up to about 1.5" diameter you are okay without speed control but it may help to slow a bit that size down if you are working on woods that are prone to burning Like maple for example.
 

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I have a PC 890 router that I have made many cabinet doors with. I do have an Incra Positioner and that makes setting up very easy. The 2.25 HP router for the 890 is very good for my router table.

There are many theories about how to cut your material. I like to cut the grove (Stile) on long pieces with feather boards. Then I use a sled to cut the rails. Keep some of the material to make setup blocks for future projects with the same bit.

As always you should make sure all your stock is the same thickness. The wood from the lumber yard varies from board to board. If you do not have consistent thickness stock you will have a lot of sanding to do on the junctions of the stile and rail.

Set up your router and run all of your stock on the same run. You need to pay attention to grain direction. Oak and even maple will splinter out if your are routing against the grain. It is like petting a cat. If you pet down from the head to the tail the fur is smooth. if you pet from the tail to the head the fur is rough and the cat does not like it very much. The same is true with the grain of the wood.

I like the Frued Premiere Shaker bits. They are adjustable and have the ability to make long tenons for heavy or large doors. Additionally you can make doors that accept glass and thick doors for heavy or large doors. Most cabinet doors are 3/4" but with the Frued you can use thicker material.
 

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Here is the back panel I made today for a jewelry armoire I am making. It is basically a cabinet door. I will use Kreg packet screws to secure it to the back of the cabinet carcus. The router is a Porter Cable 890 2.25 HP and the Frued Shaker Rail and Stile router bit set.
 

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