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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
Removing planer ripple and any other machining marks from house door rails, stiles and wide raised panels.
Whats the way to go?
Thanks.
 

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Hi,
Removing planer ripple and any other machining marks from house door rails, stiles and wide raised panels.
Whats the way to go?
Thanks.
control the snipe to start with...

smoothing plane and sanding to remove...
 

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Probably the best way to avoid snipe is to use a sacrificial piece of wood ahead and behind the actual one(s). Also, if you have multiple pieces, over lap them through the planer. So feed the lead in sacrifice, then your pieces, then the tail end sacrifice all in one uninterrupted stream.

Also, a scraper is a great tool to learn how to use. Done right, the surface can be smoother than sanding.
 

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If it`s your planer and you can slow it down that helps with the ripples. Otherwise it`s a lot of sanding or a combination like Stick suggested.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for that Stick and Phil.

Using a smoothing plane, won't the shavings removed start to alter the dimensions of the work piece? Or on the original do I allow a couple of mm to allow for this?

I've been reading about palm random orbital sanders and the air powered type. Then using sand paper to remove any little squiggles left from that to get to the required finish?
Cheers.
 

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sanded, scraped or hand plane it's still material removed...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I know little about planes, No 5, 6 etc. What size, type of smoothing plane would I be wanting for a door stile say 100mm wide x 40mm deep? Is a smoothing plane suitable for cleaning up the edge too? Just looking I've seen 22 inch long smoothing planes, that wouldn't do.
Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Probably the best way to avoid snipe is to use a sacrificial piece of wood ahead and behind the actual one(s). Also, if you have multiple pieces, over lap them through the planer. So feed the lead in sacrifice, then your pieces, then the tail end sacrifice all in one uninterrupted stream.

Also, a scraper is a great tool to learn how to use. Done right, the surface can be smoother than sanding.
Do you mean a continuous length of timber under the board I want to plane, extending out the front and rear of the board? Or are you saying just a short section under each end of the board, extending a bit from the ends of the board?
Thanks.
 

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That will help with snipe but it may not help much with the ripples. A segmented head would probably be the best way of getting rid of them. Slowing the feed speed as I suggested will help some. A very light finish pass may help some too.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
I'm familiar with Veritas tools they have a reputation for being high quality and also being very expensive. Even if I had the money I wouldn't buy one at such a high price.

In the UK that plane is around £250!

The Draper brand of tools in the UK has a long established reputation for quality and sensible price.
This Draper smoothing plane is very reasonable priced, has wooden handles. I know about you get what you pay for, bla, bla but not always the case.

This Draper plane is buy now on Ebay UK for £22.87 see Ebay UK item number 171861274455. Is not low angle but is that crucial?
The plane is available on Amazon UK a little cheaper including free delivery, has a load of very positive reviews!
Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If it`s your planer and you can slow it down that helps with the ripples. Otherwise it`s a lot of sanding or a combination like Stick suggested.
Hi Charles,
I have a home workshop type of planer/thicknesser as well as my Dewalt 633 thicknesser that can thickness 13inch wide boards.
My planer/thicknesser is the Metabo HC 260C got the wheel stand for it to, quite easy to move..... now:)
The Metabo is a clone of the Electa Beckum, itself had very positive reviews. I don't know if can get a segmented upgrade cutter block for it. Though in any case think will carry on with it as is. Unless they are available and at a reasonable price.
 

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For my work I usually use relatively short boards therefore lots of snipes on both ends. After reducing the board to required thickness, I run the boards several times through the thicknesser, both ends and both sides, without adjusting the thicknesser. This does not removes the snipes completely but considerably reduce the snipes, therefore less sanding.
P.S. - I am metalworker and don't know how to use hand plane.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
For my work I usually use relatively short boards therefore lots of snipes on both ends. After reducing the board to required thickness, I run the boards several times through the thicknesser, both ends and both sides, without adjusting the thicknesser. This does not removes the snipes completely but considerably reduce the snipes, therefore less sanding.
P.S. - I am metalworker and don't know how to use hand plane.
OK thanks.
 

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Do you mean a continuous length of timber under the board I want to plane, extending out the front and rear of the board? Or are you saying just a short section under each end of the board, extending a bit from the ends of the board?
Thanks.
Feed the first board in. Before it is out, feed the next board, before that is out, feed the next and so on. Always have several boards under the planer head. This prevents a fair amount of snipe. Just the first and last in the train get snipe and if those are sacrificial, no harm done.
 

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All great points and all work. The lazy way out is to run all your boards longer than required and then cut off the sniped ends.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Feed the first board in. Before it is out, feed the next board, before that is out, feed the next and so on. Always have several boards under the planer head. This prevents a fair amount of snipe. Just the first and last in the train get snipe and if those are sacrificial, no harm done.
OK I'm with you, thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Feed the first board in. Before it is out, feed the next board, before that is out, feed the next and so on. Always have several boards under the planer head. This prevents a fair amount of snipe. Just the first and last in the train get snipe and if those are sacrificial, no harm done.
OK thanks I'm with you now. Would a roller at the in feed and out feed help too?
 
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