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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a friend which bought a Jet 6 inch planer for a job. He used it very little and it set under a Window AC unit in his shop. Well the bed and side piece rusted after a couple of years and he gave it to me because he did not want to deal with it. I covered it with my home made penetrating oil so it could soak into the rust. It has been soaking for about 6 months. I think I need to deal with it. What grit sand paper should I use? Should I start with 220 or coarser? There are no rust pits.
 

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there are volumes of post and threads on removing rust w/ all the how to mechanicals here...
 
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You can sand it off but that won't get it out of the pores of the metal. Here is a short video testing a rust remover from Woodcraft. Since doing the vedio I have used it on a number of other things and have gotten to really like it.

 

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I would use wet/dry paper...the more coarse the paper the more work to finish it. Try a little bit higher grit (320) and see the effects, then drop down if you think it's okay. Don't use an ROS...it will leave a boatful of swirlies...

Use your favorite cutting/penetrating oil, put a block behind the paper and have at it. Then use higher and higher paper to finish to a polish.
 

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...how about a pic of what it looks like...? May get better responses...
 

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I feel your pain. This year has been freeeeeeeezing cold, then we get a warm flow out of the gulf and it goes up to a rainy 60 degrees. This has caused a lot of condensation on my tools while I am away, leading to rust on some of them. I hate wasting a day getting rust off of everything!

I use the Boeshield products, Rustfree and T9

https://boeshield.com/products/
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
Here are a couple pictures. I have soaked the rust with Stick's 50% Acetone 50%ATF over the last few months so I think the rust is soft and well soaked.

I am now thinking skipping the 220 wet dry paper and going straight to 320 wet or dry or maybe just a green scrubber. I have had good luck with 5% vinegar in the past. I don't if it would be better than the phosphoric acid...30%.
 

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I have had great luck using Boeshield products, Rustfree and T9. Just stops rust cold for me. I live in a very dry desert area, but the T9 has kept rust away for several years. Probably should renew it during our rare rainy spell.
 

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Here are a couple pictures. I have soaked the rust with Stick's 50% Acetone 50%ATF over the last few months so I think the rust is soft and well soaked.

I am now thinking skipping the 220 wet dry paper and going straight to 320 wet or dry or maybe just a green scrubber. I have had good luck with 5% vinegar in the past. I don't if it would be better than the phosphoric acid...30%.
Lee...you can use the same 50/50 mix as the wet for wet sanding...just apply and sand. I used it to restore my Lion miter knife, Delta 6" jointer and old Darra James table saw top and it worked like a charm...just prepare your shoulders and arms for the exercise... :grin:
 
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I have never had rust so bad as that but I got a used lathe that was pretty bad and I used a combination. I used a random orbit sander with that 3m non woven stuff you can use for sanding. I used the medium (Red) and put that on the velcro of the sander and used Topsaver. You can get Topsaver from Amazon. The sand paper will really mark you up and will take forever to get it down to smooth. I have also used very fine and fine diamond stones to lap a friends lathe that was pretty rusted. I used water for a lubricant for the diamond stone. I cleaned it up with mineral spirits and then applied the Topsaver. I use the Topsaver on all my cast iron and it never rusts. I live in east Texas with a pretty humid atmosphere. I also buy cheap cotton table cloths at Bed Bath and Beyond and cover my equipment to keep dust and bugs off. Occasionally I get a bird fly into the shop and they poop every time they flap their wings. The cover keeps from having a black spot caused by the birds or a dead bug dying on top of the cast iron.
 

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I've use sandpaper to clean rust from ts top, I've used belt sander, however being thrifty and to do more work than necessary, I use a powered Wagner paint stripper (bought at HD) that use pads that wear and expose new cutting surface. It to the table to a bright smooth finish. I'm guilty of using ts top for gluing, and use wet rag to clean glue squeeze out and off of table.. Small pits are not to change the cutting of the wood. I use spray Teflon on top of cast iron tools, hell of a lot less work than wax, I spray the maple sacrificial fence on table saw, bottom of router, router table top. WD40 is not allowed in my shop.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I have never had rust so bad as that but I got a used lathe that was pretty bad and I used a combination. I used a random orbit sander with that 3m non woven stuff you can use for sanding. I used the medium (Red) and put that on the velcro of the sander and used Topsaver. You can get Topsaver from Amazon. The sand paper will really mark you up and will take forever to get it down to smooth. I have also used very fine and fine diamond stones to lap a friends lathe that was pretty rusted. I used water for a lubricant for the diamond stone. I cleaned it up with mineral spirits and then applied the Topsaver. I use the Topsaver on all my cast iron and it never rusts. I live in east Texas with a pretty humid atmosphere. I also buy cheap cotton table cloths at Bed Bath and Beyond and cover my equipment to keep dust and bugs off. Occasionally I get a bird fly into the shop and they poop every time they flap their wings. The cover keeps from having a black spot caused by the birds or a dead bug dying on top of the cast iron.
Hi gdonham1
I live in central Texas and I have humidity also not as bad as east Texas. So I am kind of in the same shape as you.
What is this 3M non woven stuff for sanding? Can you explain it a little more? Where do you buy it?
 

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Evapo-Rust!! Pour on planer bed (carefully) use paper towels to spread it. Allow to sit for several hours with paper towels wetted with Evapo on the bed. You should not need sandpaper. WD-40 sprayed on the bed and covered with waxpaper if the jointer is going to be left idle for a period of time will prevent future rust. ENJOY! (Missouri's humidity got to a bunch of my stuff while left idle for six months........)
 

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This solution has proved itself as a superior and cost effective remedy for rust removal for many years. Handguns, severely rusted to the point of not moving, soaked in a 5-gallon bucket of this stuff, 95% of the time yielded, and long arms, soaked in a 10" plastic drain pipe also gave great results.

On tools that can't be submerged, considered cotton or wool (avoid synthetics) rags soaked to the dripping point wrapped around the tool. Then wrap as tightly as possible with thick plastic material. Then go away. Remember that the more this solution works, the less you'll need to do.

Be very careful with acetone in an enclosed space. It would be OK in a shed, but not in a basement where vapors could find their way to the living space. Acetone works, but is nasty.

I've made this solution with and without acetone and long term have found little difference in results. Acetone, unless completely sealed-in during the process, will quickly lose effectiveness. I no longer use acetone.

1 part kerosene
1 part mineral spirits
1 part Dexron II, IIe or III ATF.
1 part acetone

Time is your friend. Acetone is not. Remember that the amount of acetone you'll require is not miniscule and repeated exposure to the acetone fluid and vapors is not worth the cost of waiting.

Good luck and let me know how it goes.

Steve

Ed's Red Penetrating Oil
 

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I'm not suggesting anyone should take a bath in Acetone, but the reality is that it's a normal part of your metabolism; your body produces the stuff.
Occasional short term exposure to smallish quantities isn't going to hurt you.
Folks that work with FRP are using Acetone daily and for the most part the other resins and chemicals are a a lot more of a heaalth hazard than Acetone.
It is however a very volatile and flammable product. A lot of ventilation goes without saying!
https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/phs/phs.asp?id=3&tid=1
 

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I'm not suggesting anyone should take a bath in Acetone, but the reality is that it's a normal part of your metabolism; your body produces the stuff.
Occasional short term exposure to smallish quantities isn't going to hurt you.
Folks that work with FRP are using Acetone daily and for the most part the other resins and chemicals are a a lot more of a heaalth hazard than Acetone.
It is however a very volatile and flammable product. A lot of ventilation goes without saying!
https://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/phs/phs.asp?id=3&tid=1

That does it...I'm gonna start a diet of bacon for every meal...make my own acetone and bottle it...a great money saver...:surprise:

Thanks for sharing the info...wasn't aware...
 
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