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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi!

I have an old Sears Craftsman 315.17400 router that I used for a project a couple of years ago. It has 2 wrenches to change the bit instead of a locking mechanism (at least that's what Dad told me when he gave it to me.) I left the bit in it, probably not smart but....

And now it's stuck. I have the wrench Dad machined He'd lost one of them) that obviously worked because the specialized slot cut bit is in there and I used it, but I must have bent the wrench or something because it won't bite and hold it so I can get the bit out. My 2 questions are:

Can I just take it to Home Depot and get the right sized wrench or does it have to be a special wrench?

Can I put a little WD-40 on the threads to loosen it up a bit?

Thanks!
 

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Welcome N/A...
DO NOT get WD any-where's near your router no matter what anybody tells you.....
it's the last thing you want on your bearings and inside the motor..
VOE here...
get the correct sized wrench.. what you are looking for is a tappet wrench..
some localized heat from a soldering helps for loosening...
see if any of these PDF's help..

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks!

I do know how they work, it's the same idea as my Dremel on a much larger scale. I'm going to take it to HD and see if I can get the right wrenches and then it's just elbow grease. I think I may have pushed the bit too far in and that's what's making it hard to turn. Good to know about the WD, I do a lot of vintage tech work and we end up lubricating things more often (drive mechanisms and the like.)

Will report back!
 

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Hi and welcome. I agree with the WD 40. That's not what it's meant for. Some Moovit or Liquid Wrench to help break up any corrosion but the heat may be the most effective. It will cause the nut to stretch when hot enough. NAPA auto parts sells some decent quality wrenches at reasonable prices and they may have the tappet wrenches in stock. HD won't. If a regular wrench fits that's fine. The tappet wrenches are thinner in case there isn't enough room for a regular wrench.
 
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WD isn't a lubricant...
consider a dry lube when you do need a lubricant..

VOE says WD is a mistake and all myth... it's a wet something or another that attracts all kinds of trash... does way more harm than good in the scheme of things... I've made a lot of money cleaning/fixing/replacing/repairing after the fact...
It makes for a humongous mess [remember this come finishing time] and if it gets into an electric motor kiss the motor goodbye... It's also prone to flash fire and really doesn't work all that well on anything but it's convenient...

I'm real partial to Triflow but most any dry lube will work well providing it's has Teflon/PFTE in it... [higher percentage by volume is more gooder]...
CRC, Tiolube, KG and DuPont each have several most excellent industrial spec DRY SOLID FILM lubricants..
Criteria - dries dry to the touch, high pressure load bearing, contains Teflon/PFTE, barrier forming, extreme temperature range, [usually -100 to +500F] isn't hygroscopic, does not collect dirt, not flammable in dry state, chemical resistant, does not contain silicone, has a long list of compatibles and is really very long lasting... or any of or all the features WD hasn't got any of....

one thing about dry solid film lubricants is that when you apply them and you think that you didn't apply enough you have probably applied too much..
very, very little goes a loooooooooooooooong way...
Just wait until you do your saw's arbor mechanism w/ dry lube.. you and your saw will never be the same... You'll treat everything that moves in the shop in short order... Please thoroughly clean whatever before lubing..
It's a great release agent too...
Dry Film Lubricants are high performance coatings made up of very fine particles of lubricating agents blended with binders and other special additives. Once cured, these lubricating agents bond to the part surface as a solid film which reduces galling, seizing and fretting and protects against corrosion. Through the combination of these properties, dry film lubricants greatly improve the wear life of coated parts.
Dry film/solid film lubricants allow for operating pressures above the load-bearing capacity of normal greases and oils. They are also less prone to collecting soil particulates than greases and oils. In some applications, the coating is self-burnishing, leading to improved, rather than decreased, performance over time. Some blends of dry film/solid film lubricants are also temperature and chemical resistant allowing for their use in harsh environments such as jet engines where exposure to aviation fuel and extreme temperatures are the norm.
This is the type of lubricant you want to use if you have a CNC.

AVOID using anything with silicone in it, because it seems to eventually get on everything including your project and you will have all kinds of finishing problems. Silicone products should be banned from the shop along w/ WD40.

WD will kill bearings in very short order.....
it dissolves the bearing's lubricant...

Bottom line - wet lubricants and saw dust don't go together!
 

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Thanks!

I'm going to take it to HD and see if I can get the right wrenches and then it's just elbow grease.

Will report back!
any place that sells wrench like auto part stores or sears will have tappet wrenches...
 

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Theo
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I'm going to take it to HD and see if I can get the right wrenches
My choice would be Lowes. HD has never done me good, and never disappointed yet by Lowes. Actually, your local auto parts store is where I would start.
 
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I used to have a couple of old craftsman routers (still have them someplace). Both of the locks failed and I had to use a pair of vice grips on the shaft and channel locks to change the bits.

David
 

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The wrench is probably a standard size but the one wrench probably needs to be a thin one, as Stick mentioned. If you have one thin one, you might be able to use a standard (thick) one, on the collet nut.
 

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Thanks!

I do know how they work, it's the same idea as my Dremel on a much larger scale. I'm going to take it to HD and see if I can get the right wrenches and then it's just elbow grease. I think I may have pushed the bit too far in and that's what's making it hard to turn. Good to know about the WD, I do a lot of vintage tech work and we end up lubricating things more often (drive mechanisms and the like.)

Will report back!
Listen to Stick486. HD will not have the thin profile wrenches you probably need, at least in the store. We are guessing you need thin wrenches, like tappet or bicycle wrenches. If you have no wrenches, I assume you do not own a grinder or belt sander. It is easy to buy a cheap wrench and grind it down to fit.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
 

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Slick!

Welcome N/A...
DO NOT get WD any-where's near your router no matter what anybody tells you.....
it's the last thing you want on your bearings and inside the motor..
VOE here...
get the correct sized wrench.. what you are looking for is a tappet wrench..
some localized heat from a soldering helps for loosening...
see if any of these PDF's help..

.
Well, i'll be damned?!
The WD folks have brought out a PTFE dry lube!
https://www.wd40specialist.com/products/dry-lube/

I'm willing to give it a try.
 

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is it silicone free???
 

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I checked the site and it's MSDS but couldn't find any info about it yes or no. Some of the ingredients are considered proprietary so there is no finding out about them. Someone will have to try it and see if it affects finishing later.
 

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There are usually two reasons that the bit gets stuck. The first is that it has gotten a little rusty and second the collet is deformed. Either way, it is simple to get out. But first as you know you have to get a thin enough wrench. If you can't find one then simply take a cheap wrench and make it thinner with a bench grinder or angle grinder. Then hold the bit in a vise and hold the router with two hands and turn it on. I have found it easier to plug the router into a power strip and step on the power strip switch. OOOOOOOOO that's dangerous. Well if you were talking about a 1/2" drill with a lot of torque then it would be but a router doesn't have that much torque. And once the nut is loosened in the collet then it's the same as when a bit spins in a drill because it isn't tight.
 

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Hi!

I have an old Sears Craftsman 315.17400 router that I used for a project a couple of years ago. It has 2 wrenches to change the bit instead of a locking mechanism (at least that's what Dad told me when he gave it to me.) I left the bit in it, probably not smart but....

And now it's stuck. I have the wrench Dad machined He'd lost one of them) that obviously worked because the specialized slot cut bit is in there and I used it, but I must have bent the wrench or something because it won't bite and hold it so I can get the bit out. My 2 questions are:

Can I just take it to Home Depot and get the right sized wrench or does it have to be a special wrench?

Can I put a little WD-40 on the threads to loosen it up a bit?

Thanks!
I just brought up your service manual. The wrench is the usual cheap stamped steel type but your collet nut is unobstructed;the wrench doesn't have to fit in a narrow slot.You have a shaft lock so you only need one wrench. You don't need a tappet wrench or bicycle wrench or have to grind one to fit. From the scaled drawing on eReplacement it looks to be a little less than 1". The 315 at the start of your model number is is the manufacturer code for Ryobi so the wrench is more than likely metric. Go to Lowes or HD or the local auto parts store and match it up with a cheap wrench. Since you may have to apply a little elbow grease, don't buy a shortie.Even an adjustable wrench might do in a pinch. . As others have said,WD40 is not your go to rust buster. It is not the magic cure but PB Blaster and an over night soak may help and you can get it at Lowes and probably a lot of other places.
 
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