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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

I have some trim that I want to replicate at our house, but I'm not quite sure how to do it. I attached an image of the profile - it looks like the double fillet and cove bit from MLCS (I can't link to it because this is my first post), but it's not going to work with the guide on the bottom of the bit, since there's no edge I'll be running against. Any ideas?

Thanks!
 

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welcome N/A..
that cut is called a plough or groove and is done on a router table or w/ your material trapped between two opposing edge guides on your router w/ a bearing-less bit....
you could also do it w/ a top bearing bit and a straight edge guide...
VOE says to leave/stay away from MCLS bits...
there are many companies that have far superior products that are a much better value..
Freud..
Whiteside..
CMT..
Radius Cove & Bead Groove Bit
Plunge Roundover Bit

search criteria...
Radius Cove & Bead Groove Bit
Plunge Bead Groove Bit
Plunge Roundover Bit
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Oooo, I hadn't thought about doing it that way. That looks a lot easier than what I was thinking, thanks!

And thanks for the heads-up about MCLS. I somehow got on their mailing list, so I had a catalog and saw the shape I was looking for. I haven't looked any further than that yet.
 

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Good question and BTW, welcome to the fun.

Definitely the 3 piece approach. A couple of strips run through the bit, glued to a flat piece milled to the correct thickness. Easy and inexpensive. Glue and pin nailer and one roundover router bit will do it, especially in a table. Pin nailer to hold the pieces in place while the glue dries. Use waterproof glue if the piece goes on the exterior.

If you have a table saw, rout the edge of wider stock, then cut the trim piece off the edge. Repeat.

If you don't have a pin nailer or compressor yet, you have a perfect excuse. And the compressor will work for a finish nailer as well. Size of the bit is determined by the thickness you need.

That looks like the type of bit you'd use on the edge of a table.
 

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Totally not what you're asking, Yooper, but not a moulding I've ever seen around here; Was ita really old installation?
In any case, I'd be going with Nick's suggestion (3 pieces). If I needed a lot of it, I'd happily pay a mill-work shop to grind custom knives, and have them run the mouldings.
 

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@Yooper H

The reasons for favoring the 3-piece approach are many...

1. you would otherwise have to deal with hogging out the center to some appropriate amount...
2 if you did find the exact bit, once hogged out you would have to trap the piece inside the bit and run the other direction on the table because it's an inside profile...very dangerous...
3. you would still have to deal with cutting the bottom flat with a router bit, or other suitable cutter, to be exact to the base of the profile on both sides...

For the three piece...
1. you can cut the profiles with the bearing bit without a problem
2. the flat piece would not require much work
3. glue-up would be a snap
4. you would not likely see the lines very much (or at least that they would bother you)
5. if you cut the three pieces from the same timber you will see the separation even less

I'm sure others can chime in with other advantages...

Best success in your project...
 

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Totally not what you're asking, Yooper, but not a moulding I've ever seen around here; Was ita really old installation?
In any case, I'd be going with Nick's suggestion (3 pieces). If I needed a lot of it, I'd happily pay a mill-work shop to grind custom knives, and have them run the mouldings.
That was Brian's recommendation...I seconded it, Stick thirded it... :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Totally not what you're asking, Yooper, but not a moulding I've ever seen around here; Was ita really old installation?
In any case, I'd be going with Nick's suggestion (3 pieces). If I needed a lot of it, I'd happily pay a mill-work shop to grind custom knives, and have them run the mouldings.
Yeah, it's around 1920, from what I can tell. A few places in the house don't have the original molding anymore, so I'm hoping to restore it. For some reason, when they remodeled the kitchen in the 60s (including some iffy homemade cabinets), they put on flat 3" molding instead of the beautiful originals.

I'll give this a shot and see how it turns out. Thanks all, for your help!
 

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If you cut a very small rabbet in the side pieces for the center flat piece to fit into, say only 1/16" deep, the joint will be almost invisible. It's more work but it will improve the look. When it's going to be anywhere near eye level it may be worth it. If it's well above or below eye level then rarely necessary.
 
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Oooo, I hadn't thought about doing it that way. That looks a lot easier than what I was thinking, thanks!

And thanks for the heads-up about MCLS. I somehow got on their mailing list, so I had a catalog and saw the shape I was looking for. I haven't looked any further than that yet.

Don't give up on MLCS I have a house built in 1831 and was able to use one of their bits to almost identically reproduce some door molding. It was so close that you have to study the new stuff to see any difference. I have since used the same bit to produce at least a hundred linear feet of the profile and it's still going strong. They may not be the best brand in the world but I can tell you from experience that they will do everything an average person would require. When a bit gets dull you'll know it but you can expect years worth of work under normal(not production) use.
 
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