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Hi all!

First time poster here. I was just given my dad's old router and thought the router table my buddy had would work with it, but it does not. Looking for help figuring out what router tables will be compatible with my router. I have a Model 315174921 CRAFTSMAN ROUTER (https://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/user-manuals/315174921-craftsman-parts-manual). Looking to buy a lower-end router table for this to start making some picture frames with. Any help on how I know whether my router will fit the table? Most pictures I find online of the tables don't show the mounting interface itself.

Some potential options are linked below:
https://www.sears.com/craftsman-router-table/p-00937599000P?rrec=true
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Skil-Router-Table-with-Folding-Leg-Design-RAS800/205412337
https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-Universal-Router-Table-A25RT03/300234859

Thanks!
 

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Sears table was made to fit that router. Just how many different models would fit the same table I'm not sure but it could have been quite a few. I had one years ago that was stamped steel and had a 3 bolt pattern. You took the black plastic sub base off and the countersunk holes lined up with the ones on the router and the top was thin enough that the same bolts worked to hold it to the table. It wasn't much of a table, it had a small top and had to be on a level surface as it would flex easily. That router and any Sears routers that start with a 315. were made by Ryobi so the Ryobi table might work for it. Make sure it has the same bolt pattern. Any other table will need an insert plate that you will probably have to drill yourself to fit that router. There is a thread on the forum for doing that and you can get help by starting your own thread.

You should start considering upgrading to a newer router. There are pretty much no parts left to fix that one with should anything happen to it. CPO outlets sell refurbished routers at a considerable discount and they come with a warranty.
 

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The mounting on most routers is done with three small, fine thread bolts that go through whatever you're mounting the router to, and into the router itself.

I think you might consider making your own router table. Very easy to make using a nice flat piece of ply. The money you save will allow you to buy something like the Bosch 1617 EVSPK kit with both fixed and plunge base. Search the Forum for shop made router tables, lots of instructions. The Bosch fixed base will mount under the table and you can buy a small key that will allow you to adjust the bit height from above the table, a great convenience.

You will need a fence of some sort, and a really straight length of 2x6 will do fine. You clamp it to the edge of the table. You can get acceptable clamps from Harbor Freight.

At any rate, welcome to the Forum, we love to be helpful to anyone new to the hobby. I'm gong to attach a pdf that covers the many things I've learned over the years, with suggestions, hints, tips and cautions. It's kind of long, but has pictures. It may save you a few missteps that I've made.
 

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To mount in a table depends what you want to do. I have two router tables in my shop. My first and most used is a custom built offset table that is 3' wide by 4' long and has an Incra 25" positioner on it. The router is held in with a Rockler FX router lift. The lift is made by Jessum. My second router table is a Rockler table that has the same kind of lift. Both tables have Porter Cable 890 Routers.

Older routers were not friendly when they come to mounting in a router table. Newer routers are made to be adjusted from above a table. So if your router has the capability to be adjusted from the top of the table a simple plate would work. You can get those from Incra, Rrockler, Kreg and so on. If the router is not adjustable friendly then buy your self a router lift. On a router lift the router base is removed and your router is clamped in to the lift. You usually have some sort of crank to adjust the router height from the top side of the table. If I had to buy a new router lift I would buy the Incra with the magnetic plates. Incra makes incredible stuff.

It depends on your DIY skill and your budget. They sell Bosch router tables at Lowes relatively cheap and there are other internet sources like Amazon.
 

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Welcome to the forum.

My topic in this forum on my Craftsman router table upgrade may have useful information for your request. Note the method for modifying standard screws to avoid having to purchase very expensive mounting table screws.

That 315.174921 1½hp router is very nice. One thing I don't like about using that router in a router table is the depth adjustment ring.

That large depth adjustment ring, located around the circumference of the router body works great when the router is in the normal orientation. However, when the router is upside down, such as in the router table, the motor falls once the clamp screw is loosened, requiring extra effort to set the depth.



 

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David - Machinist in wood
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Welcome to the forum, Billy! Add your name to your profile so it shows in the side panel and clears the N/a.

Good luck with your picture frames - show us some photos when you're ready. We like pictures! :grin:

David
 

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Welcome aboard. As you can see there are many opinions and helpful suggestions. I guess one thing that should be asked is if you have any experience with woodworking in general and more specifically with a router, handheld or table mounted. There are some basic things you should read and know before trying to use the router such as direction of cut, depth of cut per pass, and so on. I know safety information is boring but it can save you a lot of misery and with the money you'll save from ER visits allow you to buy better tools and so on. Just saying, the router spins really, really fast, and the cutters if new or in good shape are very, very sharps. Flesh and bone doesn't resist so much in comparison to wood and wood gets cut fairly easily. Just saying....

If you're just getting started with woodworking get some solid reference material to the type of woodworking you want to do. There should be a ton of material on making picture frames out there. As for a router table, look at how router table tops are made, supported, and you'll see the ones that are most versatile will allow most any router because the router is mounted to a plate if a router lift isn't used. That same idea translates to a homemade table which can be as simple as a flat board with an opening for the cutters and the holes drilled for the router base. Most router bases on a router are made from materials such as high impact plastic or other sturdy slick materials. They are usually held on to the router by 3-4 screws. Removing those screws and transferring that pattern allows you to drill and use longer screws to attach the router to the bottom. As for a fence, as mentioned a very straight 2x6 will work just fine Here's an example https://www.finewoodworking.com/videoworkshop/2018/09/router-table-fundamentals-bob-van-****

Keep us posted on your progress and you can always post pictures by dragging them to the area below your message where it says "drag file here to attach"
 

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Hi all!

First time poster here. I was just given my dad's old router and thought the router table my buddy had would work with it, but it does not. Looking for help figuring out what router tables will be compatible with my router. I have a Model 315174921 CRAFTSMAN ROUTER (https://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/user-manuals/315174921-craftsman-parts-manual). Looking to buy a lower-end router table for this to start making some picture frames with. Any help on how I know whether my router will fit the table? Most pictures I find online of the tables don't show the mounting interface itself.

Some potential options are linked below:
https://www.sears.com/craftsman-router-table/p-00937599000P?rrec=true
https://www.homedepot.com/p/Skil-Router-Table-with-Folding-Leg-Design-RAS800/205412337
https://www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-Universal-Router-Table-A25RT03/300234859

Thanks!
Welcome to the forum you will find many good suggestions here. I make my own tables and use a drop in plate. I make my own drop in plates out of Phenolic or Aluminum. In a pinch I have used 1/4 " Lexon You can use the original plate as a pattern. The sky and your budget is the limit on what you want to make or buy for a router table.
 

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Don't forget to check for used tables. I use Craig's List and Offer Up for larger items, like this table. I use eBay for smaller stuff or for specialty parts that cannot be located otherwise.

This table is an ideal used Craig's List or Offer Up purchase at a fraction of the price for the linked items.

Get one w/ a cast aluminum table top, not a steel table top. The steel will flex too much.
 

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Bosch makes a very good table for Craftsman which is the same as the Bosch RA1181... I believe it might be the Pro or Deluxe model...search Craftsman Router Table and it will come up...a bit pricey maybe. I’m not sure if the Bosch version is drilled for Craftsman but you can certainly drill your own holes in the 1181...
 

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Just make a box, stand it on side hang the router in the box upside down. Take the subbase off the router and use it to drill the holes for the mounting screws and router bit, like was said above and
put some wings on the box to clamp the "L"shaped fence to. When you mount the router position it so the clamp is in front so you can unclamp it to drop the router out to change bits.
Herb
 

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I owned that almost exact (switch looked to be in a different position) router bought in around 1984. The switch went bad and was able to find the exact replacement on E-Bay for something like $8 about 5 years ago. I used a "table top" router table until 2013 very successfully. Think it was a Sears table, but do not remember having three holes for mounting from below. Rather, recall it having three strap clamps that connected to three grooves under the table via bolts and wing nuts provided with the table. These clamps locked the base; without the plastic face, to the underside very firmly. It have a grooved top table with adjustable fence segments. The legs were angle steel with holes in the feet for bolting to a larger wood base, or clamped to a surface. I clamped it to the table of my Sears radial arm saw of the same vintage many, many times. Used it very successfully to make a executive design mahogany desk with a lot of custom moldings in the early 1990's - with care it will not limit what you can do for a long time. My son currently has the router and table, unfortunately it'll be some weeks before I could photograph for you. Suspect you could find something compatible on E-Bay, etc.
 
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