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Discussion Starter #1
Man,
I'm restoring my dad's table saw. An old Craftsmen 113. It works great, and was my dad's so financially responsible it not it's getting done.

The top was very much covered in rust. I watched multiple YouTube videos and came away with trying ancrcukar sander holding a Scotch Brite pad, using WD-40( I used Liquid Wrench) and baking soda. Well this did not work very well. I mean it was just barely taking off very much, this guys in YouTube must not have had as much rust as I do.

I then tried the Sander with some 150 grut paper in the WD-40 baking soda, and with a lit if pressure , it takes it off and leaves it looking shiny as new. Problem is now it leaves the circular sanding marks on the table. Can I do the entire table , get it all clean, then go back and try to get rid if the sanding marks? Or does anyone have a better way.

Imagine really bad rust. My old man just kept it smooth, and yswd it I've the rust, I'm trying for more. I want it to look as good as possible. I'm putting in a new fence, motor , pretty much everything, so I will do what needs to be done.

Anybody have a great way to do this?

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, I'm totally cleaning it up. The iron is there, just gotta get the rust off

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Tom - I like the Boeshield Rust-Free for removing the rust. I'll use either wet/dry sandpaper or 3M Scotch Brite pad, maroon, under a random orbit sander. Spray on the Rust-free, let it sit for a few minutes then go at it with the paper or pad. When it's cleaned up, use either Boeshield T-9 or Johnson paste was for protection.

https://boeshield.com/products/
 

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Why the WD40, Tom? It's not really a rust removal product. Probably it's only real use is as a moisture barrier; it's not even a very good lubricant.
Stick hates the stuff!
If you just need a lubricant, how about Mineral spirits?
The two best methods of truly nuking rust are electrolysis and acid baths. Neither one is terribly convenient for a large heavy object, although, if you could separate the top from the rest of the saw assembly it wouldn't be a huge problem to knock together a wood frame, put a 6mil poly poly liner in it, and proceed with the electrolysis...all you really need is a battery trickle charger, some wire, and some scrap rebar (or other iron/steel scrap).
Rust Removal Using Electrolysis

You could also use Phosphoric acid, or even vinegar as an alternative to electrolysis, not with it
 

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Tom ~ I am in the same boat with you. I have my Dad’s old Craftsman TS, 1950 vintage and want to upgrade it. One of the best tutorials that I have found on the web is by
Even though he demonstrates a relatively newer model, the principals are still the same. Check out his play list and you will find a section that deals with removing the rust. Also, check out his recipe for making graphite wax to lubricate the trunnions and other moving parts. Good luck and keep us posted.
Bob
 

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Like Vince, I have used the Boeshield Rust-Free to get rust off my table saw. Mine was not very badly coated. It did a great job and the scotch brite pads are pretty effective at getting the tougher rust off. I've also used T-9 and /or Johnson paste wax to protect the surface once it's cleaned. Don't use a car wax that has silicone - silicone will affect the wood you run through the saw.

I am in the process now of cleaning up a pretty badly rusted toolbox which had a painted surface. Since I'm going to be repainting it, I tried soaking it with vinegar. The vinegar does a great job on loosening up the rust, but it's a little tough to soak the toolbox because of its size. I would pour or spray it on and if I ran into a particularly rusty area, I would get it wet, cover it with a shop towel or several layers of paper towels and then soak them with vinegar. Some areas I let sit overnight and then went over them with scotch brite pads – by hand if it was in a confined space and under a sander pad if it was on a wider flat surface. The vinegar did a pretty good job. I don't know whether it would help to wrap the vinegar soaked rags in Saran wrap or some other plastic wrap to keep the vinegar from evaporating, but the vinegar and time seemed to take care of my rust problem pretty well. When I finish the rust removal, I plan to rinse the toolbox off with a baking soda and water solution to neutralize the acid in the vinegar.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I don't know if you'd call this rust, maybe it's just stained almost dark brown black from rust? Lol

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Why the WD40, Tom? It's not really a rust removal product. Probably it's only real use is as a moisture barrier; it's not even a very good lubricant.
Stick hates the stuff!
If you just need a lubricant, how about Mineral spirits?
The two best methods of truly nuking rust are electrolysis and acid baths. Neither one is terribly convenient for a large heavy object, although, if you could separate the top from the rest of the saw assembly it wouldn't be a huge problem to knock together a wood frame, put a 6mil poly poly liner in it, and proceed with the electrolysis...all you really need is a battery trickle charger, some wire, and some scrap rebar (or other iron/steel scrap).
Rust Removal Using Electrolysis

You could also use Phosphoric acid, or even vinegar as an alternative to electrolysis, not with it
Lol

About every video on YouTube they use some type of penetrating oil to wetsand. Yeah...I'm looking in to this more

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