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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks, I'm back after a number of years of read only, not posting.

I've been really busy with cabinet making, building construction, sawmill operation, router applications, lathe building, lathe turning, heavy equipment repair and land clearing, too many things to enumerate.

I plan to show a few of my projects and look forward to reading your comments. your comments.

It's good to be back, I think.

Art

Table built from mahogany scraps left from my cabinet shop days.
 

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Sounds like you've been busy, Art. Nice job on the table!

You "think" you're glad to be back? My line of thinking at the moment on the forum, is that ... well, nm. We have great members & moderators/volunteers here. I look forward to seeing some of your projects, even if they are out of my league. I always appreciate another person's abilities.
 

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Nice work and yes I would say you have been busy......... I'm interested in hearing about all of them especially the sawmill.
 

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To quote Oliver Twist, "Please sir, I want some more." Let us see more projects. The table is great!
 

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Welcome back Art.
 

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Welcome back, Art...
 

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Looks really amazing, and excellent workmanship! Could I ask how you have catered for differential wood movement between long and end grain on some of the panels?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
A little more about my table: The only routing was the rounding over and chamfering on various edges. I did buy, especially for this project, a morticing chisel set. I'd never used one, nor even seen one since high school. but it was a fun learning experience.

I like to draw detailed plans for all my projects so I can get dimensions and angles right off the drawings. This way, things usually go together as expected, and you can hopefully catch design flaws that would make the project impossible to finish, or unusable. That being said, I made one of the first cuts on one of the precious heavier, 2x4 leg blanks (no extra stock available) in the wrong place rendering it 4 inches too short. The only solution was to figure out and place a few dowels and a really long heavy screw to hold and glue the leg back together.

I was able to shape the leg and place the nearly invisible seam at the top where it is out sight hidden in the shadows.

The legs are tapered thinner and narrower at the top and thicker and wider at the bottom. Also they flair lengthwise and side to side of the table. I had to build a lot of little jigs to hold the parts at the right angles on the drill press. The table is rock solid, but can be easily disassembled for shipping and storage by removing the pins from the mortices holding the X braces, and removing thumb screws to separate the trapazoidal leg assemblies from the top.

The top is about 42 x 60. I had to pay a nearby cabinet shop $15 to nun it through his wide belt sander. I was concerned about differential shrinkage and swelling of cross grain vs linear grain in the large glued up panel, so I avoided any direct 90 degree end to side seams and so far no cracking or bulging, after several years.

That's all for now.

Art S
 

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You've shown the work of a true professional. It will be nice if in the future you could show progress shots of some of your future projects.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hey Marco: I bought an old Wood Mizer LT 40, several years back. It was one of the early models, but after a bunch of repairs and upgrades I comfortably cut a lot of lumber with it. I had to replace the main drive spindle bearing, the battery box, the axel, most of the wiring, the voltage regulator, coil, plugs and condenser, ign switch, and elevator motor. I did a little adjusting on the bed ways and blade guides.

I's a manual machine except for the electric up-down feed and the electric carriage feed. I added a weather canopy to keep the rain and snow off me, and to eliminate the need to tarp the engine and mill when not in use. I also added an engine driven air compressor to clean the rails which need to be kept free from sawdust build up in the track wheels. l junked out the original cam type log clamp and replaced it with one made from a railroad jack, which allows you to operate alone, and without having to walk around behind the machine for every log roll or change.

A customer recently brought me a nice pine log from which we cut 20ea 2 x 10s.

Any specific questions let me know

Art S
 

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